YEARS

2003-2007

AUTHORS

Julius Fridriksson

TITLE

Neurological Predictors of Aphasia Recovery

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The long-term objective of this research is to increase understanding of the relationship between brain changes and behavioral recovery from stroke. Recent studies of the relationship between brain perfusion, lesion size, and early severity of aphasia (language disorder) in stroke suggest that these variables are strongly correlated. It is not clear, however, how changes in cerebral perfusion and lesion size may be related to behavioral recovery following stroke. MRI provides means for quick assessment of cerebral perfusion and lesion size in the acute stages of stroke. Along with behavioral testing, MRI makes it possible to investigate how changes in neurological factors are related to stroke recovery. The specific aims of this project are to answer the following questions: 1. Do changes in cerebral hypoperfusion and/or lesion size predict recovery from aphasia and hemispatial neglect during the first month following stroke. 2. Does the extent of cerebral hypoperfusion and/or lesion size in acute ischemic stroke predict recovery from aphasia and hemispatial neglect and clinical outcome at one-month post-onset? Answers to these questions will provide insight into how brain changes and behavioral recovery may be related in early stroke. Consequently, they provide means to improve management of early stroke and, subsequently, aphasia and hemispatial neglect. That is, if the extent of behavioral recovery can be predicted based on brain physiology in the acute care [stage?], it is possible that stroke treatment can be better calibrated.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Speech perception in MRI scanner noise by persons with aphasia.
  • Obligatory Broca's area modulation associated with passive speech perception.
  • Motor speech perception modulates the cortical language areas.
  • Modulation of frontal lobe speech areas associated with the production and perception of speech movements.
  • Severe Broca's aphasia without Broca's area damage.
  • Cortical activation and language task difficulty in aphasia.
  • Treating visual speech perception to improve speech production in nonfluent aphasia.
  • Spaced retrieval treatment of anomia.
  • Sentence comprehension and general working memory.
  • Neural recruitment associated with anomia treatment in aphasia.
  • Aphasia severity: Association with cerebral perfusion and diffusion.
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    28 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      29 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:f3fa6f279dc3e2ef4bc68dfc1c61988f sg:abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The long-term objective of this research is to increase understanding of the relationship between brain changes and behavioral recovery from stroke. Recent studies of the relationship between brain perfusion, lesion size, and early severity of aphasia (language disorder) in stroke suggest that these variables are strongly correlated. It is not clear, however, how changes in cerebral perfusion and lesion size may be related to behavioral recovery following stroke. MRI provides means for quick assessment of cerebral perfusion and lesion size in the acute stages of stroke. Along with behavioral testing, MRI makes it possible to investigate how changes in neurological factors are related to stroke recovery. The specific aims of this project are to answer the following questions: 1. Do changes in cerebral hypoperfusion and/or lesion size predict recovery from aphasia and hemispatial neglect during the first month following stroke. 2. Does the extent of cerebral hypoperfusion and/or lesion size in acute ischemic stroke predict recovery from aphasia and hemispatial neglect and clinical outcome at one-month post-onset? Answers to these questions will provide insight into how brain changes and behavioral recovery may be related in early stroke. Consequently, they provide means to improve management of early stroke and, subsequently, aphasia and hemispatial neglect. That is, if the extent of behavioral recovery can be predicted based on brain physiology in the acute care [stage?], it is possible that stroke treatment can be better calibrated.
    2 sg:endYear 2007
    3 sg:fundingAmount 218250.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
    5 sg:hasContribution contributions:fbbd03eb77ee86639ba7b38cb9ad5743
    6 sg:hasFieldOfResearchCode anzsrc-for:11
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    8 sg:hasFundedPublication articles:067300a79d1b6747268b1b1fc7766885
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    18 articles:eb3dc8455465c45e6d2a3995b8d88e7b
    19 sg:hasFundingOrganization grid-institutes:grid.214431.1
    20 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.254567.7
    21 sg:language English
    22 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    23 sg:scigraphId f3fa6f279dc3e2ef4bc68dfc1c61988f
    24 sg:startYear 2003
    25 sg:title Neurological Predictors of Aphasia Recovery
    26 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6923663
    27 rdf:type sg:Grant
    28 rdfs:label Grant: Neurological Predictors of Aphasia Recovery
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