YEARS

2008-2013

AUTHORS

Catherine A Chesla

TITLE

CBPR with Immigrant Chinese with Diabetes

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Project Summary/ Abstract The epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the U.S. is particularly acute in ethnic minority groups. Disproportionately high rates of diabetes, 1.6 to 3 times those observed in European Americans, are found in Chinese Americans, the largest group of Asian Americans and one of the most rapidly growing immigrant groups. Chinese Americans have cultural concerns about family obligation and well- being that are challenged by health prescriptions that assume a Western individualistic orientation. Few culturally appropriate interventions for immigrant Chinese with T2DM are available and none address the family context of disease management. The proposed project is a part of a research program to improve management of T2DM through a community-academic partnership. Specific aims are to: 1. Strengthen a community-academic partnership with the immigrant Chinese community in San Francisco to improve diabetes management;2. Adapt and test a behavioral diabetes intervention, Coping Skills Training, to address family and cultural issues in immigrant Chinese patients with T2DM;and 3. Disseminate findings about the adapted Coping Skills Training intervention via the community-academic partnership to the immigrant Chinese American community through service programs, ethnic media, and professional scientific publications. A mixed-methods community based participatory research approach (CBPR) will be used to adapt and test a behavioral intervention, Coping Skills Training, to be culturally appropriate. A repeated measures design will be used to test the efficacy of the adapted intervention protocol. In a previous collaboration, two historically significant social service and health agencies serving immigrant Chinese in San Francisco have partnered with this nurse-led interdisciplinary research team to describe Chinese family processes of care of T2DM. This project will enable the same partners to co-develop an intervention that strengthens patient skills for coping with personal and family dilemmas in their disease management. Formative research processes are proposed, including strengthening interagency linkages, partnering with patient and community advisors to adapt the intervention, and testing the intervention using culturally respectful approaches. Thirty patients will be recruited to adapt the intervention, and 150 to test the efficacy of the adapted intervention. This application addresses the NINR program areas of health disparities and self management in illness through an intervention designed to} enhance health seeking and health maintenance behaviors (by incorporating) cultural norms and values of communities and their members.} Significance: Although Chinese American immigrants demonstrate significant health disparities, services tailored to their cultural concerns are few, perhaps because of a `model minority'stereotype that mischaracterizes Asian Americans as free from health and social problems. The proposed project aims to improve diabetes management in immigrant Chinese patients by partnering with the community to develop an efficacious diabetes behavioral intervention that incorporates cultural concerns. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Significance: Although Chinese American immigrants demonstrate significant health disparities, services tailored to their cultural concerns are few, perhaps because of a 'model minority'stereotype that mischaracterizes Asian Americans as free from health and social problems. The proposed project aims to improve diabetes management in immigrant Chinese patients by partnering with the community to develop an efficacious diabetes behavioral intervention that incorporates cultural concerns.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Testing the efficacy of culturally adapted coping skills training for Chinese American immigrants with type 2 diabetes using community-based participatory research.
  • Health communication with Chinese Americans about type 2 diabetes.
  • Gender differences in factors related to diabetes management in Chinese American immigrants.
  • Assessing the cultural in culturally sensitive printed patient-education materials for Chinese Americans with type 2 diabetes.
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    21 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      22 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:ce989564dd172dbc51f30bfe15336c30 sg:abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Project Summary/ Abstract The epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the U.S. is particularly acute in ethnic minority groups. Disproportionately high rates of diabetes, 1.6 to 3 times those observed in European Americans, are found in Chinese Americans, the largest group of Asian Americans and one of the most rapidly growing immigrant groups. Chinese Americans have cultural concerns about family obligation and well- being that are challenged by health prescriptions that assume a Western individualistic orientation. Few culturally appropriate interventions for immigrant Chinese with T2DM are available and none address the family context of disease management. The proposed project is a part of a research program to improve management of T2DM through a community-academic partnership. Specific aims are to: 1. Strengthen a community-academic partnership with the immigrant Chinese community in San Francisco to improve diabetes management;2. Adapt and test a behavioral diabetes intervention, Coping Skills Training, to address family and cultural issues in immigrant Chinese patients with T2DM;and 3. Disseminate findings about the adapted Coping Skills Training intervention via the community-academic partnership to the immigrant Chinese American community through service programs, ethnic media, and professional scientific publications. A mixed-methods community based participatory research approach (CBPR) will be used to adapt and test a behavioral intervention, Coping Skills Training, to be culturally appropriate. A repeated measures design will be used to test the efficacy of the adapted intervention protocol. In a previous collaboration, two historically significant social service and health agencies serving immigrant Chinese in San Francisco have partnered with this nurse-led interdisciplinary research team to describe Chinese family processes of care of T2DM. This project will enable the same partners to co-develop an intervention that strengthens patient skills for coping with personal and family dilemmas in their disease management. Formative research processes are proposed, including strengthening interagency linkages, partnering with patient and community advisors to adapt the intervention, and testing the intervention using culturally respectful approaches. Thirty patients will be recruited to adapt the intervention, and 150 to test the efficacy of the adapted intervention. This application addresses the NINR program areas of health disparities and self management in illness through an intervention designed to} enhance health seeking and health maintenance behaviors (by incorporating) cultural norms and values of communities and their members.} Significance: Although Chinese American immigrants demonstrate significant health disparities, services tailored to their cultural concerns are few, perhaps because of a `model minority'stereotype that mischaracterizes Asian Americans as free from health and social problems. The proposed project aims to improve diabetes management in immigrant Chinese patients by partnering with the community to develop an efficacious diabetes behavioral intervention that incorporates cultural concerns. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Significance: Although Chinese American immigrants demonstrate significant health disparities, services tailored to their cultural concerns are few, perhaps because of a 'model minority'stereotype that mischaracterizes Asian Americans as free from health and social problems. The proposed project aims to improve diabetes management in immigrant Chinese patients by partnering with the community to develop an efficacious diabetes behavioral intervention that incorporates cultural concerns.
    2 sg:endYear 2013
    3 sg:fundingAmount 1664196.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
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    10 articles:be6769e522e28155b8c22a308bc6d571
    11 articles:d8f356281c2e0380779dbd0d24b158ac
    12 sg:hasFundingOrganization grid-institutes:grid.280738.6
    13 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.266102.1
    14 sg:language English
    15 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    16 sg:scigraphId ce989564dd172dbc51f30bfe15336c30
    17 sg:startYear 2008
    18 sg:title CBPR with Immigrant Chinese with Diabetes
    19 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8054946
    20 rdf:type sg:Grant
    21 rdfs:label Grant: CBPR with Immigrant Chinese with Diabetes
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