YEARS

2007-2013

AUTHORS

Julius Fridriksson

TITLE

Neural Predictors of Anomia Recovery in Aphasia

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): This project will investigate the relation between neurophysiology and anomia recovery in aphasia following stroke. Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States, with an increasing number of patients surviving stroke, typically to a life of greatly reduced quality. Aphasia is one of the most frequent and tragic impairments that result from stroke. It is crucial to be able to understand how to determine an accurate prognosis, and also to maximize the effects of therapy on recovery. This project is focused on anomia recovery in aphasia, but also has more general applicability to recovery of motor and cognitive function following stroke. Previous research suggests the size and location of brain damage may be important factors in determining the extent of treatment-assisted aphasia recovery. While basic lesion parameters of size and location can be derived from the MRI scans of routine clinical investigation, many more sophisticated modalities of MRI are now available. This proposal will determine the degree to which standard structural scans can be used to predict treatment outcome, and what extra value can be derived from other MRI techniques such as perfusion and diffusion weighted MRI. The present project uses a prospective design to investigate the relation among 'brain fitness'(the structural lesion, cerebral perfusion, fiber density, and peri-lesional gliosis) and treatment assisted anomia recovery in aphasia. A group of persons with aphasia will undergo detailed assessment of neurophysiology using standard and advanced MRI techniques before and after two types of anomia treatment either focusing on phonological or semantic processing. The value of different indices will be assessed using logistic regression techniques that we have recently developed and validated. In addition, this research will investigate the neural basis of treated language recovery using fMRI. The long term goals of this research are to design more accurate and appropriate approaches to determine prognosis of patients with aphasia, maximizing the effects of treatment by ensuring optimal selection of treatment according to lesion parameters, and identifying targets for novel therapeutic interventions by assessing the neural substrates of successful recovery.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Cerebral perfusion in chronic stroke: implications for lesion-symptom mapping and functional MRI.
  • Age-related relative volume preservation of the dominant hand cortical region.
  • Feasibility of using high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) to enhance treatment outcomes in persons with aphasia.
  • Chronic Broca's Aphasia Is Caused by Damage to Broca's and Wernicke's Areas.
  • Transcranial direct current stimulation improves naming reaction time in fluent aphasia: a double-blind, sham-controlled study.
  • Obligatory Broca's area modulation associated with passive speech perception.
  • Motor speech perception modulates the cortical language areas.
  • Modulation of frontal lobe speech areas associated with the production and perception of speech movements.
  • Damage to the anterior arcuate fasciculus predicts non-fluent speech production in aphasia.
  • An evaluation of traditional and novel tools for lesion behavior mapping.
  • Preservation and modulation of specific left hemisphere regions is vital for treated recovery from anomia in stroke.
  • Severe Broca's aphasia without Broca's area damage.
  • Temporal order processing of syllables in the left parietal lobe.
  • Damage to left anterior temporal cortex predicts impairment of complex syntactic processing: a lesion-symptom mapping study.
  • Cortical mapping of naming errors in aphasia.
  • Extrahippocampal gray matter loss and hippocampal deafferentation in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.
  • Using transcranial direct-current stimulation to treat stroke patients with aphasia.
  • Patterns of poststroke brain damage that predict speech production errors in apraxia of speech and aphasia dissociate.
  • Re-establishing Broca's initial findings.
  • Treating visual speech perception to improve speech production in nonfluent aphasia.
  • Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.
  • Neural recruitment for the production of native and novel speech sounds.
  • Speech entrainment enables patients with Broca's aphasia to produce fluent speech.
  • Measuring and inducing brain plasticity in chronic aphasia.
  • Subcortical damage and white matter disconnection associated with non-fluent speech.
  • Activity in preserved left hemisphere regions predicts anomia severity in aphasia.
  • Neural correlates of phonological and semantic-based anomia treatment in aphasia.
  • Spatial attention evokes similar activation patterns for visual and auditory stimuli.
  • Left hemisphere plasticity and aphasia recovery.
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