YEARS

2000-2003

AUTHORS

Mei-Yu Y Yu

TITLE

CULTURAL BELIEFS AND BREAST CANCER SCREENING

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION: (Applicant's Description) Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer for Chinese in the United States As Chinese women move to the United States from China and other Asian countries, their chances of getting breast cancer increase, and the risk of breast cancer in successive generations also increases. Breast cancer mammography screening is known to be an effective early detection measure, but Chinese Americans are reluctant to make visits for routine or preventive care. Preliminary studies suggest that cultural beliefs about health and disease prevention have important influences on Chinese women's health behavior, such as mammography screening. The complex nature of doing research with Asian Americans requires cultural appropriateness of the assessment instruments. However, adequate research instruments with established reliability and validity to measure the association between women' s cultural beliefs and their cancer screening behaviors are lacking. The objective of the proposed study is to establish the psychometric properties of a Chinese-English "Cultural Beliefs and Cancer Screening (CBCS)" questionnaire that measures the full range of concepts derived from prior empirical and promising theoretical work. Guided by culturally-specific adaptations made to the health belief model (HBM), we will adopt existing instruments when necessary (e.g., Champion's Breast Cancer Screening Belief Scales and Mood's Cultural Affiliation Scale), translate and pre-test the bilingual Chinese-English CBCS questionnaire that measures theoretically and empirically-derived concepts thought to be related to mammography use (Aim I). Based on data from Chinese American women using a culturally sensitive sampling methodology, we will then assess reliability and validity of each component of the CBCS questionnaire using culturally appropriate qualitative and quantitative research (Aim 2). Finally, we will evaluate the adequacy of the independent variables in the CBCS questionnaire as predictors of mammography use (Aim 3). Lower utilization of breast cancer screening is probably responsible for a greater proportion of tumors found at a later stage among Chinese American women compared to United States white women. The CBCS questionnaire will facilitate development of future intervention programs that succeed in increasing the use of mammography screening by Chinese American women. It is anticipated that the CBCS questionnaire will also benefit a variety of studies designed for the United States minority populations, especially Asian Americans, in which cultural beliefs about cancer and cancer screening are important elements for performing cancer early detection.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Factors influencing mammography screening of Chinese American women.
  • Reliability and validity of the mammography screening beliefs questionnaire among Chinese American women.
  • Challenges of identifying asian women for breast cancer screening.
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    20 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      21 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:7a43d13a4f72f04c2eb7bebea91301df sg:abstract DESCRIPTION: (Applicant's Description) Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer for Chinese in the United States As Chinese women move to the United States from China and other Asian countries, their chances of getting breast cancer increase, and the risk of breast cancer in successive generations also increases. Breast cancer mammography screening is known to be an effective early detection measure, but Chinese Americans are reluctant to make visits for routine or preventive care. Preliminary studies suggest that cultural beliefs about health and disease prevention have important influences on Chinese women's health behavior, such as mammography screening. The complex nature of doing research with Asian Americans requires cultural appropriateness of the assessment instruments. However, adequate research instruments with established reliability and validity to measure the association between women' s cultural beliefs and their cancer screening behaviors are lacking. The objective of the proposed study is to establish the psychometric properties of a Chinese-English "Cultural Beliefs and Cancer Screening (CBCS)" questionnaire that measures the full range of concepts derived from prior empirical and promising theoretical work. Guided by culturally-specific adaptations made to the health belief model (HBM), we will adopt existing instruments when necessary (e.g., Champion's Breast Cancer Screening Belief Scales and Mood's Cultural Affiliation Scale), translate and pre-test the bilingual Chinese-English CBCS questionnaire that measures theoretically and empirically-derived concepts thought to be related to mammography use (Aim I). Based on data from Chinese American women using a culturally sensitive sampling methodology, we will then assess reliability and validity of each component of the CBCS questionnaire using culturally appropriate qualitative and quantitative research (Aim 2). Finally, we will evaluate the adequacy of the independent variables in the CBCS questionnaire as predictors of mammography use (Aim 3). Lower utilization of breast cancer screening is probably responsible for a greater proportion of tumors found at a later stage among Chinese American women compared to United States white women. The CBCS questionnaire will facilitate development of future intervention programs that succeed in increasing the use of mammography screening by Chinese American women. It is anticipated that the CBCS questionnaire will also benefit a variety of studies designed for the United States minority populations, especially Asian Americans, in which cultural beliefs about cancer and cancer screening are important elements for performing cancer early detection.
    2 sg:endYear 2003
    3 sg:fundingAmount 151376.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
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    8 sg:hasFundedPublication articles:07eb4783917b4c47a4d95693bcde92ce
    9 articles:3ae5241c75f5e0d570b1043bf931e754
    10 articles:558ecaf4eaf102befa2c8d5b6675593d
    11 sg:hasFundingOrganization grid-institutes:grid.48336.3a
    12 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.214458.e
    13 sg:language English
    14 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    15 sg:scigraphId 7a43d13a4f72f04c2eb7bebea91301df
    16 sg:startYear 2000
    17 sg:title CULTURAL BELIEFS AND BREAST CANCER SCREENING
    18 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6377937
    19 rdf:type sg:Grant
    20 rdfs:label Grant: CULTURAL BELIEFS AND BREAST CANCER SCREENING
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