YEARS

1977-1995

AUTHORS

Harold Goodglass

TITLE

BOSTON UNIVERSITY APHASIA RESEARCH CENTER

ABSTRACT

This is a continuation of a program for the study of clinical, neurolinguistic and neuroanatomic aspects of aphasia. The long term objectives are to advance the understanding of the mechanisms of normal language and their neural basis so as to develop a coherent view of how the symptomatology of aphasia relates to the injury of particular brain structures and consequent modification of linguistic and cognitive capacities. A concurrent goal is apply developing theoretical insights to a rationally based diagnostic assessment and treatment of aphasia. Specific goals in the proposed project period and methods of accomplishing them are: 1. To investigate disorders of sentence comprehension and sentence production in terms of the explanatory power of specific cognitive and linguistic principles. 2. To study word production and word comprehension with techniques that probe the unfolding of these processes and their breakdown in real time. 3. To study the long term recovery of aphasics in terms of changes in neurological, linguistic, cognitive and social function. 4. To study the basis for perseveration in aphasia, and the basis for its improvement with therapy. 5. To investigate the neurochemical basis of nonfluency in aphasia and its pharmacological treatment, using bromocriptine. 6. To investigate the role of the right hemisphere in mediating language recovery in aphasia. 7. To study the CT and MRI scan lesion correlates of long term recovery in particular language skills and to compare the effectiveness of these two imaging techniques.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Syntactic priming effects in aphasia: an investigation of local syntactic dependencies.
  • Decision latencies for phonological and semantic information in object identification.
  • Semantic operations in aphasic comprehension: implications for the cortical organization of language.
  • Acquired 'theory of mind' impairments following stroke.
  • Coherence violations and propositional usage in the narratives of fluent aphasics.
  • Sentence production by aphasic patients in a constrained task.
  • The neurology of empty categories aphasics' failure to detect ungrammaticality.
  • Speed of lexical activation in nonfluent Broca's aphasia and fluent Wernicke's aphasia.
  • The mapping from sound structure to the lexicon in aphasia: evidence from rhyme and repetition priming.
  • Consonant and vowel production of right hemisphere patients.
  • The use of pronoun anaphora and speaker mood in the interpretation of conversational utterances by right hemisphere brain-damaged patients.
  • Attentional modulation of language performance.
  • Visible changes in lesion borders on CT scan after five years poststroke, and long-term recovery in aphasia.
  • The role of lexical status on the phonetic categorization of speech in aphasia.
  • Treatment of aphasia.
  • Gap-filling and end-of-sentence effects in real-time language processing: implications for modeling sentence comprehension in aphasia.
  • A perspective on the neurobiology of language.
  • Subcortical aphasia: distinct profiles following left putaminal hemorrhage.
  • The foreign accent syndrome: a reconsideration.
  • Lesion site patterns in severe, nonverbal aphasia to predict outcome with a computer-assisted treatment program.
  • There is an entity called agrammatic aphasia.
  • Functional localization in the brain with respect to syntactic processing.
  • The neurological organization of some aspects of sentence comprehension.
  • Perseveration. Part II: A study of perseveration in closed-head injury.
  • More on sentence comprehension in Broca's aphasia: a response to Caplan.
  • The existence of comprehension patterns in Broca's aphasia.
  • Pantomime, praxis, and aphasia.
  • Processing complexity and sentence memory: evidence from amnesia.
  • How to move away from dualism.
  • Semantic capacities of the right hemisphere as seen in two cases of pure word blindness.
  • Sensitivity to conversational deviance in right-hemisphere-damaged patients.
  • The allocation of memory resources during sentence comprehension: evidence from the elderly.
  • Syntactic processing in aphasia.
  • Neural basis for sentence comprehension: grammatical and short-term memory components.
  • Structural alterations of an ambiguous musical figure: the scale illusion revisited.
  • Role of FGF3 in otic capsule chondrogenesis in vitro: an antisense oligonucleotide approach.
  • A linguistic approach to developmental dyslexia.
  • Subcortical aphasia: the core profile of capsulostriatal infarction.
  • The changing relationship between anatomic and cognitive explanation in the neuropsychology of language.
  • Neuroimaging and language recovery in stroke.
  • Lesion localization in apractic agraphia.
  • Change in object naming ability during adulthood.
  • Preserved semantic priming effect in alexia.
  • Judgments of concept similarity by normal and aphasic subjects: relation to naming and comprehension.
  • Story processing in right-hemisphere brain-damaged patients.
  • Temporal dimensions of consonant and vowel production: an acoustic and CT scan analysis of aphasic speech.
  • Perseveration. Part I: a review.
  • Broca's aphasia is associated with a single pattern of comprehension performance: a reply.
  • articles:c0fbb0d6c8a371ff4c43af020193b970
  • The breakdown of binding relations.
  • Neural systems and language processing: toward a synthetic approach.
  • The boston corpus of aphasic naming errors.
  • Transforming growth factor beta 1 is an epithelial-derived signal peptide that influences otic capsule formation.
  • Selective preservation of a lexical category in aphasia: dissociations in comprehension of body parts and geographical place names following focal brain lesion.
  • Neural correlates of lexicon and grammar: evidence from the production, reading, and judgment of inflection in aphasia.
  • Back to the future: reclaiming aphasia from cognitive neurolinguistics.
  • Comprehension of wh-questions in two Broca's aphasics.
  • Trace deletion, theta-roles, and cognitive strategies.
  • An on-line analysis of syntactic processing in Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia.
  • A restrictive theory of agrammatic comprehension.
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