YEARS

2013-2014

AUTHORS

Sarah Bergman Nadimpalli

TITLE

Relationships between discrimination and the health of South Asian Americans

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Exposure to discrimination has well-documented negative effects on the physical and mental health of ethnic minorities. The majority of discrimination and health studies have focused on African American and Latino American populations. Asian Americans, in particular South Asian Americans (SAAs), are underrepresented in these studies. There are currently more than 3.4 million SAAs living in the US; the following groups comprise 97% of South Asians living in the US: Asian Indians (2,662,112), Pakistanis (211,356), and Bangladeshis (69,687). Although SAAs are comprised of several heterogeneous groups and speak various languages, SAAs share similarities such as having close familial support networks. Collectively, SAAs have experienced a historical legacy of discriminatory immigration policies, violent hate crimes, and chronic insults. SAAs living in New York City are uniquely vulnerable to discrimination and its related health consequences, given that they have been stereotyped, targeted as threats, and victimized by violence and discrimination since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In the literature exploring discrimination and the health of Asian Americans, relationships have been found between self-reported discrimination (SRD) and depression, anxiety, obesity, and physical pain. However, the discrimination and Asian American health literature can be expanded through a specific focus on SAAs, the inclusion of direct health measures, improved description of the theoretical links between variables, and improved measures. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to address gaps in the current literature, explicate the specific vulnerability of SAAs to discrimination, and explore correlates between discrimination and health outcomes. Ecosocial theory and other stress-related theories underpin the proposed study and suggest that negative, chronic, and stressful experiences of discrimination lead to activation and maintenance of a stress response that can lead to poorer health. The persistent activation of this stress response can result in hig blood pressure, weight gain, anxiety, and depression-all of which are indicators for chronic illness and CVD risk. Therefore, an advanced understanding of how discrimination contributes to poorer SAA health outcomes, which is often theoretically linked to stress, is a timely and significant endeavor in nursing science. Aligned with the mission of NINR to address health disparities, nursing science should investigate how discrimination may increase the health risks of SAAs who are exposed to it on a routine basis. Nursing science can address discrimination as an important promoter of illness and provide future research, community interventions, and social policy recommendations that will ameliorate its impact on the health of SAAs. The aims of the proposed study are to (1) investigate the relationships between SRD and mental health among adult male and female SAAs (Indian, Pakistani, and Bangledeshi groups) and (2) investigate the relationships between SRD and physical health (self-reported physical health conditions and direct, physiologic measures [BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure]) of SAAs.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • The association between discrimination and depressive symptoms among older African Americans: the role of psychological and social factors.
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    18 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      19 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:55814cc7894f1f9f7df9b4463a37e176 sg:abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Exposure to discrimination has well-documented negative effects on the physical and mental health of ethnic minorities. The majority of discrimination and health studies have focused on African American and Latino American populations. Asian Americans, in particular South Asian Americans (SAAs), are underrepresented in these studies. There are currently more than 3.4 million SAAs living in the US; the following groups comprise 97% of South Asians living in the US: Asian Indians (2,662,112), Pakistanis (211,356), and Bangladeshis (69,687). Although SAAs are comprised of several heterogeneous groups and speak various languages, SAAs share similarities such as having close familial support networks. Collectively, SAAs have experienced a historical legacy of discriminatory immigration policies, violent hate crimes, and chronic insults. SAAs living in New York City are uniquely vulnerable to discrimination and its related health consequences, given that they have been stereotyped, targeted as threats, and victimized by violence and discrimination since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In the literature exploring discrimination and the health of Asian Americans, relationships have been found between self-reported discrimination (SRD) and depression, anxiety, obesity, and physical pain. However, the discrimination and Asian American health literature can be expanded through a specific focus on SAAs, the inclusion of direct health measures, improved description of the theoretical links between variables, and improved measures. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to address gaps in the current literature, explicate the specific vulnerability of SAAs to discrimination, and explore correlates between discrimination and health outcomes. Ecosocial theory and other stress-related theories underpin the proposed study and suggest that negative, chronic, and stressful experiences of discrimination lead to activation and maintenance of a stress response that can lead to poorer health. The persistent activation of this stress response can result in hig blood pressure, weight gain, anxiety, and depression-all of which are indicators for chronic illness and CVD risk. Therefore, an advanced understanding of how discrimination contributes to poorer SAA health outcomes, which is often theoretically linked to stress, is a timely and significant endeavor in nursing science. Aligned with the mission of NINR to address health disparities, nursing science should investigate how discrimination may increase the health risks of SAAs who are exposed to it on a routine basis. Nursing science can address discrimination as an important promoter of illness and provide future research, community interventions, and social policy recommendations that will ameliorate its impact on the health of SAAs. The aims of the proposed study are to (1) investigate the relationships between SRD and mental health among adult male and female SAAs (Indian, Pakistani, and Bangledeshi groups) and (2) investigate the relationships between SRD and physical health (self-reported physical health conditions and direct, physiologic measures [BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure]) of SAAs.
    2 sg:endYear 2014
    3 sg:fundingAmount 29284.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
    5 sg:hasContribution contributions:fdc2da33921ea33dd14f075b56782f1d
    6 sg:hasFieldOfResearchCode anzsrc-for:11
    7 anzsrc-for:1117
    8 sg:hasFundedPublication articles:808eed9b91db343a907f2d4bf168f795
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    10 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.137628.9
    11 sg:language English
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    13 sg:scigraphId 55814cc7894f1f9f7df9b4463a37e176
    14 sg:startYear 2013
    15 sg:title Relationships between discrimination and the health of South Asian Americans
    16 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8525643
    17 rdf:type sg:Grant
    18 rdfs:label Grant: Relationships between discrimination and the health of South Asian Americans
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