YEARS

2011-2016

AUTHORS

Xinqi Dong

TITLE

Chinese Health and Aging Project: Building Support through Community Engagement

ABSTRACT

This application aims to set the foundation for a longitudinal population-based study of relevant health issues in older Chinese persons by leveraging a comprehensive model of community engagement. The diverse US population is rapidly aging; as such, it is imperative from a public health perspective that we have accurate understanding of relevant health issues among specific racial/ethnic populations. There are an estimated 3.8 million Chinese in the US, and Chicago has one of the largest aggregations. Despite the rapid growth, we have the most rudimentary understanding of many critical health issues facing the older Chinese population (cognitive impairment, physical disability, racial discrimination, psychological distress, social isolation, filial piety, cultural values, and elder mistreatment [elder abuse, neglect and exploitation perpetrated by others as well as elder self-neglect]. Furthermore, there has been inadequate community network and support necessary to empower the Chinese community to be fully engaged in health sciences research. These impediments necessitate the further development and implementation of sustainable and equal partnership of both community and researchers through reciprocal transfer of expertise to improve the health of the Chinese population. Several challenges to conducting a community-engaged population study in a Chicago Chinese population make the proposed developmental work an important first step to conducting a longitudinal population-based cohort study. These challenges are: 1) US Chinese older persons have been reluctant to participate in government sponsored research and sustainable community support has been inadequate; 2) there is incomplete enumeration at the local level of Chinese older persons in the community; and 3) there are marked linguistic and cultural barriers that make a population-based study challenging. In this proposed work, a bilingual and bicultural principal investigator and an experienced interdisciplinary investigative team at the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging are collaborating with Chinese community to overcome these barriers. The specific aims of this feasibility study are to: 1) Further engage the community to build a culturally appropriate and sustainable collaborative partnership in support of the study; 2) Pilot a random block census of older Chinatown residents; and 3) Examine the linguistic and cultural barriers of studying relevant health disparity issues. The findings from this proposal and community engagement activities can be critical to the successful conduct of a community-engaged longitudinal population-based study of relevant health issues in Chinese older persons.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Advancing the field of elder abuse: future directions and policy implications.
  • The prevalence of elder self-neglect in a community-dwelling population: hoarding, hygiene, and environmental hazards.
  • Vulnerability risk index profile for elder abuse in a community-dwelling.
  • Elder abuse: research, practice, and health policy. The 2012 GSA Maxwell Pollack award lecture.
  • Screening for Elder Abuse in Healthcare Settings: Why Should We Care, and Is It a Missed Quality Indicator?
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    22 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      23 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:4d3d58abbaf2f6997f3a586cc1ae0b25 sg:abstract This application aims to set the foundation for a longitudinal population-based study of relevant health issues in older Chinese persons by leveraging a comprehensive model of community engagement. The diverse US population is rapidly aging; as such, it is imperative from a public health perspective that we have accurate understanding of relevant health issues among specific racial/ethnic populations. There are an estimated 3.8 million Chinese in the US, and Chicago has one of the largest aggregations. Despite the rapid growth, we have the most rudimentary understanding of many critical health issues facing the older Chinese population (cognitive impairment, physical disability, racial discrimination, psychological distress, social isolation, filial piety, cultural values, and elder mistreatment [elder abuse, neglect and exploitation perpetrated by others as well as elder self-neglect]. Furthermore, there has been inadequate community network and support necessary to empower the Chinese community to be fully engaged in health sciences research. These impediments necessitate the further development and implementation of sustainable and equal partnership of both community and researchers through reciprocal transfer of expertise to improve the health of the Chinese population. Several challenges to conducting a community-engaged population study in a Chicago Chinese population make the proposed developmental work an important first step to conducting a longitudinal population-based cohort study. These challenges are: 1) US Chinese older persons have been reluctant to participate in government sponsored research and sustainable community support has been inadequate; 2) there is incomplete enumeration at the local level of Chinese older persons in the community; and 3) there are marked linguistic and cultural barriers that make a population-based study challenging. In this proposed work, a bilingual and bicultural principal investigator and an experienced interdisciplinary investigative team at the Rush Institute for Healthy Aging are collaborating with Chinese community to overcome these barriers. The specific aims of this feasibility study are to: 1) Further engage the community to build a culturally appropriate and sustainable collaborative partnership in support of the study; 2) Pilot a random block census of older Chinatown residents; and 3) Examine the linguistic and cultural barriers of studying relevant health disparity issues. The findings from this proposal and community engagement activities can be critical to the successful conduct of a community-engaged longitudinal population-based study of relevant health issues in Chinese older persons.
    2 sg:endYear 2016
    3 sg:fundingAmount 332891.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
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    17 sg:scigraphId 4d3d58abbaf2f6997f3a586cc1ae0b25
    18 sg:startYear 2011
    19 sg:title Chinese Health and Aging Project: Building Support through Community Engagement
    20 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8323236
    21 rdf:type sg:Grant
    22 rdfs:label Grant: Chinese Health and Aging Project: Building Support through Community Engagement
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