YEARS

2003-2008

AUTHORS

Yoonsun Choi

TITLE

Risk factors for Problem Behaviors of Asian Youth

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The United States has seen a rapid growth in Asian American families in recent years, but little is known about the mental health of Asian American youth. The few studies of Asian youth present an unclear picture. Some studies suggest that these youths are disproportionately engaged in problem behaviors, such as street gang membership and violence, while others demonstrate healthy adaptation and adjustment. This mixed picture could be the result of methodologically inadequate studies such as the use of non-representative samples. It is possible, however, that there actually is a bimodal distribution of developmental outcomes for Asian youth in US, with both notable success and failure. In addition, we do not know if the risk factors for the mental health and behavioral outcomes of Asian American youth are the same as those for other ethnic groups or whether there are some factors that are unique to Asian families. For example, an emerging literature emphasizes that the factors related to race/ethnicity and culture, like cultural adaptation, ethnic identity and experience of racial discrimination, are salient to Asian youth and deserve greater attention. The effects of these factors on youth outcomes have been postulated in recent literature, but there is little empirical data and theory that explain the mechanisms affected by these factors. Our lack of understanding of these important issues calls for improved research on Asian American youth. This proposed study will allow the candidate to begin contributing to fill these gaps in the knowledge about the mental health and behaviors of Asian American youth. Using the knowledge and skills acquired in the career development experiences, the following mentored research activities are proposed both to answer empirical questions and to further develop independent research skills. First, using existing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), the prevalence, levels, and developmental trajectories of problem outcomes will be compared among adolescents who are Asian-, Latin-, European- and African Americans. The comparisons will also be made among subgroups of Asian American youth. Secondly, using existing longitudinal data from both Add Health and the Cross-Cultural Families Project (CCF), the relationships between risk and protective factors, both general in all groups and those specific to these groups, and youth outcomes will be investigated. Last, new data will be collected to refine and develop measures of cultural adaptation for future studies. Knowledge generated from this study and future studies by the candidate can lead to the development of culturally appropriate, thus more effective, interventive strategies that reduce problem behaviors and enhance resiliency among Asian American youth and subgroups.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Intergenerational Cultural Dissonance, Parent-Child Conflict and Bonding, and Youth Problem Behaviors among Vietnamese and Cambodian Immigrant Families.
  • Intergenerational Cultural Dissonance, Parent–Child Conflict and Bonding, and Youth Problem Behaviors among Vietnamese and Cambodian Immigrant Families
  • Testing the Model Minority Stereotype: Youth Behaviors across Racial and Ethnic Groups.
  • Neighborhoods, Family, and Substance Use: Comparisons of the Relations across Racial and Ethnic Groups.
  • Academic Achievement and Problem Behaviors among Asian Pacific Islander American Adolescents.
  • Are multiracial adolescents at greater risk? Comparisons of rates, patterns, and correlates of substance use and violence between monoracial and multiracial adolescents.
  • Examining Equivalence of Concepts and Measures in Diverse Samples
  • Preservation and Modification of Culture in Family Socialization: Development of Parenting Measures for Korean Immigrant Families.
  • Examining equivalence of concepts and measures in diverse samples.
  • Is Asian American Parenting Controlling and Harsh? Empirical Testing of Relationships between Korean American and Western Parenting Measures.
  • Race–Ethnicity and Culture in the Family and Youth Outcomes: Test of a Path Model with Korean American Youth and Parents
  • Race-Ethnicity and Culture in the Family and Youth Outcomes: Test of a Path Model with Korean American Youth and Parents.
  • DIVERSITY WITHIN: SUBGROUP DIFFERENCES OF YOUTH PROBLEM BEHAVIORS AMONG ASIAN PACIFIC ISLANDER AMERICAN ADOLESCENTS.
  • Academic Achievement and Problem Behaviors among Asian Pacific Islander American Adolescents
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    33 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      34 URIs      9 LITERALS

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    29 sg:startYear 2003
    30 sg:title Risk factors for Problem Behaviors of Asian Youth
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