YEARS

2007-2013

AUTHORS

John W Erdman

TITLE

Tomatoes, Lycopene, and Prostate Carcinogenesis in Mice

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The overall research focus of the collaborative team from the University of Illinois and The Ohio State University has been to determine the impact of tomatoes and their bioactive components, especially lycopene, on prostate carcinogenesis. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men and dietary approaches that reduce risk, or delay onset, would have profound impact on public health. Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that consumption of tomato products reduces the risk of prostate cancer. We propose to carry out studies in transgenic mice to determine if the tomato carotenoids, lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene, or their metabolic products reduce the risk of development and progression of prostate cancer. In order to answer the questions raised in this proposal, we will utilize two new mouse strains that lack one of the two known mammalian carotenoid cleavage enzymes, carotenoid 15, 15'monooxygenase (CMO-I) and carotenoid 9', 10'monooxygenase (CMO-II). The three major specific aims are: 1) delineate the tissue-specific expression of CMO-I and CMO-II in A) wild-type, CMO-I knockout (KO), and CMO-II KO mice in response to short (3 days) and long term (30 days) feeding of different levels of tomato powder or lycopene, and in B) TRAMP mice during the development of carcinogenesis, 2) precisely determine how changes in CMO-I and CMO-II expression dictate A) tissue biodistribution of tomato carotenoids, and B) production of lycopenoids and other tomato carotenoid metabolites, and 3) to investigate the effect of altered tomato carotenoid metabolism on prostate cancer by A) creating double transgenic mice and B) differentiating the ability of dietary tomato powder and lycopene to inhibit prostate cancinogenesis in TRAMP, TRAMP X CMO-I KO, and TRAMP X CMO-II KO mice. We are uniquely qualified to carry out the proposed studies due to our broad expertise with carotenoids and cancer models, access to CMO-I KO and II KO mice, and our ability to biosynthesize radiolabeled tomato carotenoids using tomato cell suspension culture. Our continuing hypothesis is that genetic polymorphisms involved in metabolism of carotenoids, such as CMO-I and II, are critical determinants of the benefits of tomato products against prostate carcinogenesis in humans. These studies will allow us to determine if tomato carotenoids, or their metabolic products, are able to prevent or counteract the development of prostate cancer.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • The interactions of dietary tomato powder and soy germ on prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model.
  • β-Carotene-9',10'-oxygenase status modulates the impact of dietary tomato and lycopene on hepatic nuclear receptor-, stress-, and metabolism-related gene expression in mice.
  • Genetic ablation of carotene oxygenases and consumption of lycopene or tomato powder diets modulate carotenoid and lipid metabolism in mice.
  • Differential bioavailability, clearance, and tissue distribution of the acyclic tomato carotenoids lycopene and phytoene in mongolian gerbils.
  • Tomato-based food products for prostate cancer prevention: what have we learned?
  • Can Food Processing Enhance Cancer Protection?
  • Tomato-based food products for prostate cancer prevention: what have we learned?
  • Phytoene, Phytofluene, and Lycopene from Tomato Powder Differentially Accumulate in Tissues of Male Fisher 344 Rats.
  • Are the health attributes of lycopene related to its antioxidant function?
  • Loss of carotene-9',10'-monooxygenase expression increases serum and tissue lycopene concentrations in lycopene-fed mice.
  • Lycopene and apo-10'-lycopenal do not alter DNA methylation of GSTP1 in LNCaP cells.
  • An interaction between carotene-15,15'-monooxygenase expression and consumption of a tomato or lycopene-containing diet impacts serum and testicular testosterone.
  • Lycopene biodistribution is altered in 15,15'-carotenoid monooxygenase knockout mice.
  • Herbicide treatments alter carotenoid profiles for 14C tracer production from tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum cv. VFNT cherry) cell cultures.
  • Optimization of lycopene extraction from tomato cell suspension culture by response surface methodology.
  • Lycopene and apo-12'-lycopenal reduce cell proliferation and alter cell cycle progression in human prostate cancer cells.
  • Dietary tomato and lycopene impact androgen signaling- and carcinogenesis-related gene expression during early TRAMP prostate carcinogenesis.
  • How to use: Click on a object to move its position. Double click to open its homepage. Right click to preview its contents.

    Download the RDF metadata as:   json-ld nt turtle xml License info


    34 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      35 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:2b7ebff2b90e941bf6f6f49535ffe3cd sg:abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The overall research focus of the collaborative team from the University of Illinois and The Ohio State University has been to determine the impact of tomatoes and their bioactive components, especially lycopene, on prostate carcinogenesis. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men and dietary approaches that reduce risk, or delay onset, would have profound impact on public health. Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that consumption of tomato products reduces the risk of prostate cancer. We propose to carry out studies in transgenic mice to determine if the tomato carotenoids, lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene, or their metabolic products reduce the risk of development and progression of prostate cancer. In order to answer the questions raised in this proposal, we will utilize two new mouse strains that lack one of the two known mammalian carotenoid cleavage enzymes, carotenoid 15, 15'monooxygenase (CMO-I) and carotenoid 9', 10'monooxygenase (CMO-II). The three major specific aims are: 1) delineate the tissue-specific expression of CMO-I and CMO-II in A) wild-type, CMO-I knockout (KO), and CMO-II KO mice in response to short (3 days) and long term (30 days) feeding of different levels of tomato powder or lycopene, and in B) TRAMP mice during the development of carcinogenesis, 2) precisely determine how changes in CMO-I and CMO-II expression dictate A) tissue biodistribution of tomato carotenoids, and B) production of lycopenoids and other tomato carotenoid metabolites, and 3) to investigate the effect of altered tomato carotenoid metabolism on prostate cancer by A) creating double transgenic mice and B) differentiating the ability of dietary tomato powder and lycopene to inhibit prostate cancinogenesis in TRAMP, TRAMP X CMO-I KO, and TRAMP X CMO-II KO mice. We are uniquely qualified to carry out the proposed studies due to our broad expertise with carotenoids and cancer models, access to CMO-I KO and II KO mice, and our ability to biosynthesize radiolabeled tomato carotenoids using tomato cell suspension culture. Our continuing hypothesis is that genetic polymorphisms involved in metabolism of carotenoids, such as CMO-I and II, are critical determinants of the benefits of tomato products against prostate carcinogenesis in humans. These studies will allow us to determine if tomato carotenoids, or their metabolic products, are able to prevent or counteract the development of prostate cancer.
    2 sg:endYear 2013
    3 sg:fundingAmount 1441569.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
    5 sg:hasContribution contributions:a8c74f653ec82e28e9a18424788a8bc8
    6 sg:hasFieldOfResearchCode anzsrc-for:11
    7 anzsrc-for:1112
    8 sg:hasFundedPublication articles:0db442cb43200b4ca81c3dfd06889315
    9 articles:338dd5c965d44e63379c874fa1aee7b9
    10 articles:47cb9789f4afaae0df609ae0c92a1710
    11 articles:51a579124d7146e05a173e703c91a6b0
    12 articles:655bedca9bd65c85e9e4bea197451db9
    13 articles:68bef4812a15cfe1665154e23c273cf4
    14 articles:6911722a6e912f6dbf7ac4177cf048df
    15 articles:712266967de1cac52fc12caf79a733f8
    16 articles:8973966bd6ca04d442e9d092cfe0631e
    17 articles:9086afe9b00fafcc31837420069aef91
    18 articles:97b0d317c14fd790ea041d3011db32bb
    19 articles:b6e698c1bbe716205b8540edaf3e19f7
    20 articles:dfa72fc057362a4ef25371d44a0e9bdd
    21 articles:e55feadd18fa22847e24a929993efefc
    22 articles:f5a089738a2dbc4e7cb51fd58e42037c
    23 articles:f69dd0cbc5c7d07689760a4a239001cd
    24 articles:fbeaf91f7fedc29d92c71e1533d200b3
    25 sg:hasFundingOrganization grid-institutes:grid.48336.3a
    26 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.35403.31
    27 sg:language English
    28 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    29 sg:scigraphId 2b7ebff2b90e941bf6f6f49535ffe3cd
    30 sg:startYear 2007
    31 sg:title Tomatoes, Lycopene, and Prostate Carcinogenesis in Mice
    32 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8103912
    33 rdf:type sg:Grant
    34 rdfs:label Grant: Tomatoes, Lycopene, and Prostate Carcinogenesis in Mice
    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular JSON format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/2b7ebff2b90e941bf6f6f49535ffe3cd'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations .

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/2b7ebff2b90e941bf6f6f49535ffe3cd'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/2b7ebff2b90e941bf6f6f49535ffe3cd'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/2b7ebff2b90e941bf6f6f49535ffe3cd'






    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...