YEARS

2010-2011

AUTHORS

Ann Kiki Anaebere

TITLE

Exploring Transitions in Sexual Decision-Making, Urban African American Women

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): African American women account for more than 66% of the estimated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) cases among women nationally. The surge in HIV cases for this population has proven to be most significant for individuals between the ages of 18-39. The majority of AIDS cases among African American women continues to be concentrated largely in urban areas with heterosexual contact remaining the leading cause of HIV acquisition among this population. Research targeting urban African American women has primarily focused on identifying causes of high-risk sexual behaviors (for example;poverty, impaired gender-power perception, and lack of social support). However, research continues to emphasize the importance of understanding the sexual-decision making patterns of heterosexual African Americans;as well as exploring what this population believes are sexual-risk factors for HIV acquisition. For many, sexual behaviors, whether high-risk or STD/HIV-protective, are often not static behaviors. Rather, behaviors among sexually active individuals have been shown to alternate between episodes of high-risk and STD/HIV-protective sexual behaviors. Limited research, however;has focused on exploring factors that have lead to transitions in one's sexual decision making practices related to condom use and sex-partner selection. Examining this perspective will be key to the process of HIV prevention efforts for urban African American women. The specific aims of this study are: 1) To describe what factors contribute to heterosexual urban African American women's decision to engage in sexual intercourse, 2) To understand what urban African American women define as 'high risk'and 'safe'sex behaviors, 3) To explore the patterns in sexual decision-making related to condom use and sex partner selection among African American women from urban communities. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Studies that have been used to guide the formulation of HIV interventions that have attempted to account for the socio-cultural factors impacting HIV risk for urban African American women, have focused primarily on exploring and highlighting the causes of high-risk sexual behaviors among African American women. Research, however;continues to emphasize the importance of understanding the sexual-decision making patterns of heterosexual African Americans;as well as exploring what this population believes are sexual-risk factors for HIV acquisition, in order to create efficacious HIV prevention programs. This study will focus primarily on examining transitions in sexual decision-making among urban African American women since onset of becoming sexually active, in order to identify mechanisms to curb HIV rates among my target population.

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    18 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      19 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:1a3f406459052b741dd166071e83237b sg:abstract DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): African American women account for more than 66% of the estimated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) cases among women nationally. The surge in HIV cases for this population has proven to be most significant for individuals between the ages of 18-39. The majority of AIDS cases among African American women continues to be concentrated largely in urban areas with heterosexual contact remaining the leading cause of HIV acquisition among this population. Research targeting urban African American women has primarily focused on identifying causes of high-risk sexual behaviors (for example;poverty, impaired gender-power perception, and lack of social support). However, research continues to emphasize the importance of understanding the sexual-decision making patterns of heterosexual African Americans;as well as exploring what this population believes are sexual-risk factors for HIV acquisition. For many, sexual behaviors, whether high-risk or STD/HIV-protective, are often not static behaviors. Rather, behaviors among sexually active individuals have been shown to alternate between episodes of high-risk and STD/HIV-protective sexual behaviors. Limited research, however;has focused on exploring factors that have lead to transitions in one's sexual decision making practices related to condom use and sex-partner selection. Examining this perspective will be key to the process of HIV prevention efforts for urban African American women. The specific aims of this study are: 1) To describe what factors contribute to heterosexual urban African American women's decision to engage in sexual intercourse, 2) To understand what urban African American women define as 'high risk'and 'safe'sex behaviors, 3) To explore the patterns in sexual decision-making related to condom use and sex partner selection among African American women from urban communities. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Studies that have been used to guide the formulation of HIV interventions that have attempted to account for the socio-cultural factors impacting HIV risk for urban African American women, have focused primarily on exploring and highlighting the causes of high-risk sexual behaviors among African American women. Research, however;continues to emphasize the importance of understanding the sexual-decision making patterns of heterosexual African Americans;as well as exploring what this population believes are sexual-risk factors for HIV acquisition, in order to create efficacious HIV prevention programs. This study will focus primarily on examining transitions in sexual decision-making among urban African American women since onset of becoming sexually active, in order to identify mechanisms to curb HIV rates among my target population.
    2 sg:endYear 2011
    3 sg:fundingAmount 24986.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
    5 sg:hasContribution contributions:45210c4fbaaed44440896b3330992a1b
    6 sg:hasFieldOfResearchCode anzsrc-for:11
    7 anzsrc-for:1117
    8 sg:hasFundedPublication articles:fda113fd9c97f0114bd9fc9d5113b271
    9 sg:hasFundingOrganization grid-institutes:grid.280738.6
    10 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.19006.3e
    11 sg:language English
    12 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    13 sg:scigraphId 1a3f406459052b741dd166071e83237b
    14 sg:startYear 2010
    15 sg:title Exploring Transitions in Sexual Decision-Making, Urban African American Women
    16 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=8059439
    17 rdf:type sg:Grant
    18 rdfs:label Grant: Exploring Transitions in Sexual Decision-Making, Urban African American Women
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