YEARS

1998-2005

AUTHORS

David W Gow

TITLE

LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND ACCESS IN APHASIA

ABSTRACT

DESCRIPTION (Adapted from the Investigator's Abstract): The long-term goal of this project is to examine lexical segmentation in aphasia, and to use the resulting data to help understand how humans accomplish the difficult task of recognizing individual words in connected speech. The strategy behind the research is to identify patients with specific impairments in targeted aspects of language processing including lexical access, and the discrimination of putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues, and examine how they interpret speech sequences known as oronyms in which positing different word boundaries leads to recognizing different words (e.g., kidnap/kid nap). It will address four issues: (1) whether lexical segmentation is the results of a discrete process, or a byproduct of lexical access, (2) how the acoustic form of word onsets affects lexical segmentation, (3) what the timecourse of segmentation disambiguation is, and (4) what factors modulate interword competition in lexical access and/or segmentation. These issues will be examined through a series of offline discrimination tasks and online paradigms including cross-modal lexical priming and word monitoring that provide implicit measures of aphasic and unimpaired listeners' interpretation of oronyms. This research will provide both individual and group studies of lexical access and segmentation and their impairment. At present there are no published studies examining lexical segmentation in aphasia. As segmentation is one of the central problems of spoken word recognition in connected speech processing, this work addresses a critical gap in our understanding of aphasic disturbances of spoken language comprehension. In addition to characterizing the nature of segmentation processes in aphasia, this work will provide a new source of converging evidence to understand the organization of spoken word recognition processes in normal listeners. It is expected that the understanding gained will ultimately be useful to clinicians, therapists and theorists.

FUNDED PUBLICATIONS

  • Feature parsing: feature cue mapping in spoken word recognition.
  • How to use: Click on a object to move its position. Double click to open its homepage. Right click to preview its contents.

    Download the RDF metadata as:   json-ld nt turtle xml License info


    21 TRIPLES      17 PREDICATES      22 URIs      9 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 grants:12cc2f5d282691429b217f87e6085c8f sg:abstract DESCRIPTION (Adapted from the Investigator's Abstract): The long-term goal of this project is to examine lexical segmentation in aphasia, and to use the resulting data to help understand how humans accomplish the difficult task of recognizing individual words in connected speech. The strategy behind the research is to identify patients with specific impairments in targeted aspects of language processing including lexical access, and the discrimination of putative acoustic-phonetic word boundary cues, and examine how they interpret speech sequences known as oronyms in which positing different word boundaries leads to recognizing different words (e.g., kidnap/kid nap). It will address four issues: (1) whether lexical segmentation is the results of a discrete process, or a byproduct of lexical access, (2) how the acoustic form of word onsets affects lexical segmentation, (3) what the timecourse of segmentation disambiguation is, and (4) what factors modulate interword competition in lexical access and/or segmentation. These issues will be examined through a series of offline discrimination tasks and online paradigms including cross-modal lexical priming and word monitoring that provide implicit measures of aphasic and unimpaired listeners' interpretation of oronyms. This research will provide both individual and group studies of lexical access and segmentation and their impairment. At present there are no published studies examining lexical segmentation in aphasia. As segmentation is one of the central problems of spoken word recognition in connected speech processing, this work addresses a critical gap in our understanding of aphasic disturbances of spoken language comprehension. In addition to characterizing the nature of segmentation processes in aphasia, this work will provide a new source of converging evidence to understand the organization of spoken word recognition processes in normal listeners. It is expected that the understanding gained will ultimately be useful to clinicians, therapists and theorists.
    2 sg:endYear 2005
    3 sg:fundingAmount 353556.0
    4 sg:fundingCurrency USD
    5 sg:hasContribution contributions:5e4067d0bfd48b08b3819cf72b9cae51
    6 sg:hasFieldOfResearchCode anzsrc-for:17
    7 anzsrc-for:1701
    8 anzsrc-for:1702
    9 anzsrc-for:20
    10 anzsrc-for:2004
    11 sg:hasFundedPublication articles:f7a731250091960f0e61a7f6468471c3
    12 sg:hasFundingOrganization grid-institutes:grid.214431.1
    13 sg:hasRecipientOrganization grid-institutes:grid.32224.35
    14 sg:language English
    15 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    16 sg:scigraphId 12cc2f5d282691429b217f87e6085c8f
    17 sg:startYear 1998
    18 sg:title LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND ACCESS IN APHASIA
    19 sg:webpage http://projectreporter.nih.gov/project_info_description.cfm?aid=6497126
    20 rdf:type sg:Grant
    21 rdfs:label Grant: LEXICAL SEGMENTATION AND ACCESS IN APHASIA
    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular JSON format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/12cc2f5d282691429b217f87e6085c8f'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations .

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/12cc2f5d282691429b217f87e6085c8f'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/12cc2f5d282691429b217f87e6085c8f'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/grants/12cc2f5d282691429b217f87e6085c8f'






    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...