COPYRIGHT YEAR

2014

AUTHORS

J. Mark Davis

TITLE

Overview of Issues Related to Serving Asian and Asian American Clients

ABSTRACT

The Asian population in the USA is expected to increase by 79 % between 2000 and 2050, and the Asian population grew faster than any other racial group, expanding from around 10 million to approximately 15 million, between 2000 and 2010. At the same time, estimates suggest that minorities comprise only 7.2 % of the American Psychological Association (APA) membership and 6.8 % of the Division 40 membership. Only 1.7 % of individuals certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology have Asian surnames, admittedly a crude estimate of the number of neuropsychologists of Asian heritage. The National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) directory lists fewer than 20 clinical neuropsychologists who report proficiency in Asian languages. With nearly 15 million people in the USA self-identifying as “Asian,” it is unlikely that an Asian American who presents for neuropsychological assessment will be served by a neuropsychologist from their racial, ethnic, and/or linguistic background. Clinical neuropsychologists who are not from Asian backgrounds need to learn about factors that likely influence assessment and treatment with Asian American clients. This chapter provides an overview of demographic characteristics of major Asian groups (except those from the Indian subcontinent) and sets the stage for more in-depth discussion of cultural, linguistic, ethical, cognitive, and psychometric factors later in the book. Clinical neuropsychologists who lack knowledge of cultural variables and appropriate procedures and norms specific to Asians or Asian Americans are at risk for failing to engage clients and for making assumptions and conclusions based on faulty, inadequate, or inappropriate information.

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1 book-chapters:de64558108433ce0f78cd4f715f32bb9 sg:abstract Abstract The Asian population in the USA is expected to increase by 79 % between 2000 and 2050, and the Asian population grew faster than any other racial group, expanding from around 10 million to approximately 15 million, between 2000 and 2010. At the same time, estimates suggest that minorities comprise only 7.2 % of the American Psychological Association (APA) membership and 6.8 % of the Division 40 membership. Only 1.7 % of individuals certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology have Asian surnames, admittedly a crude estimate of the number of neuropsychologists of Asian heritage. The National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN) directory lists fewer than 20 clinical neuropsychologists who report proficiency in Asian languages. With nearly 15 million people in the USA self-identifying as “Asian,” it is unlikely that an Asian American who presents for neuropsychological assessment will be served by a neuropsychologist from their racial, ethnic, and/or linguistic background. Clinical neuropsychologists who are not from Asian backgrounds need to learn about factors that likely influence assessment and treatment with Asian American clients. This chapter provides an overview of demographic characteristics of major Asian groups (except those from the Indian subcontinent) and sets the stage for more in-depth discussion of cultural, linguistic, ethical, cognitive, and psychometric factors later in the book. Clinical neuropsychologists who lack knowledge of cultural variables and appropriate procedures and norms specific to Asians or Asian Americans are at risk for failing to engage clients and for making assumptions and conclusions based on faulty, inadequate, or inappropriate information.
2 sg:chapterNumber Chapter 1
3 sg:copyrightHolder Springer Science+Business Media New York
4 sg:copyrightYear 2014
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15 sg:scigraphId de64558108433ce0f78cd4f715f32bb9
16 sg:title Overview of Issues Related to Serving Asian and Asian American Clients
17 sg:webpage https://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-1-4614-8075-4_1
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