COPYRIGHT YEAR

2015

AUTHORS

Mike Farquharson-Roberts

TITLE

The Naval Officer in World War Two: The Apogee

ABSTRACT

When the Second World War broke out, the executive officer corps of the Royal Navy was in a much better condition than might have seemed possible a few years earlier. Significant weaknesses in their professional education and training had been addressed, morale was much improved from the low point of 1931–2, and significant improvements had been made in the way they were managed. However, the ultimate test of a navy is war; proof of the efficacy of the changes is in the performance of the navy in the Second World War. The final two chapters of this book examine that performance, to show that the navy, was in Professor Rodger’s words ‘fit for purpose’.1 However, while some of the personnel and organisational failings apparent in the First World War had been addressed, it will be shown that a significant weakness remained: there was a failure to generate enough commanding officers. In part this was because far more commanding officers were to be required than could have been anticipated (for example for the enormous amphibious forces), but also because the navy did not recognise straight away that the Second World War made very different demands of its commanding officers than it had expected. However, the navy coped extremely well despite this shortcoming because it was a flexible and adaptable force which was, in turn, a reflection of the quality of its officers.

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24 TRIPLES      24 PREDICATES      21 URIs      14 LITERALS

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1 book-chapters:b607c99b6840ff9069818f4529e6a8a9 sg:abstract Abstract When the Second World War broke out, the executive officer corps of the Royal Navy was in a much better condition than might have seemed possible a few years earlier. Significant weaknesses in their professional education and training had been addressed, morale was much improved from the low point of 1931–2, and significant improvements had been made in the way they were managed. However, the ultimate test of a navy is war; proof of the efficacy of the changes is in the performance of the navy in the Second World War. The final two chapters of this book examine that performance, to show that the navy, was in Professor Rodger’s words ‘fit for purpose’.1 However, while some of the personnel and organisational failings apparent in the First World War had been addressed, it will be shown that a significant weakness remained: there was a failure to generate enough commanding officers. In part this was because far more commanding officers were to be required than could have been anticipated (for example for the enormous amphibious forces), but also because the navy did not recognise straight away that the Second World War made very different demands of its commanding officers than it had expected. However, the navy coped extremely well despite this shortcoming because it was a flexible and adaptable force which was, in turn, a reflection of the quality of its officers.
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7 sg:copyrightHolder Mike Farquharson-Roberts
8 sg:copyrightYear 2015
9 sg:ddsId Chap11
10 sg:doi 10.1057/9781137481962_11
11 sg:esmRights OpenAccess
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14 sg:hasContribution contributions:3a75f4d72e39c307124e7812ea9c8032
15 sg:language En
16 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
17 sg:metadataRights OpenAccess
18 sg:pageFirst 188
19 sg:pageLast 214
20 sg:scigraphId b607c99b6840ff9069818f4529e6a8a9
21 sg:title The Naval Officer in World War Two: The Apogee
22 sg:webpage https://link.springer.com/10.1057/9781137481962_11
23 rdf:type sg:BookChapter
24 rdfs:label BookChapter: The Naval Officer in World War Two: The Apogee
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