COPYRIGHT YEAR

2014

AUTHORS

Ignacio Moreno-Torres, Guadalupe Dávila, Marcelo L. Berthier, Natalia García-Casares

TITLE

Post-stroke Aphasia

ABSTRACT

Aphasia is a generic term used to describe a range of impairments in language function following acquired brain damage typically involving the left hemisphere [1–3]. Aphasia may affect all modes of expressive and receptive communication including speaking, understanding, writing, reading, and gesturing [1–3]. This definition seems superficial because it merely describes the surface behavioral deficits of aphasia (e.g., word-finding difficulty and reduced fluency) and mentions nothing about the underlying source of functional impairments. Some scientists prefer to describe aphasia as a multimodal impairment of the integral constituents of language, such as phonology, syntax, morphology, and lexical semantics [4]. Aphasia should not be regarded as a domain-specific language disorder because other cognitive skills (e.g., attention, learning, and memory and executive function) essential for normal processing of language are usually impaired as well. A growing body of evidence indicates that the adequate functioning of these nonlanguage cognitive functions is crucial for the recovery of aphasia and communication deficits [5]. This would imply that formal assessment of aphasia should not be restricted to the language domain; rather it needs to be expanded to include other cognitive and behavioral domains (see later). A new conceptualization of aphasia as a “discrete acquired disorder with a variety of aetiologies but specific characteristics” has been proposed as it provides a more informative viewpoint that may be useful to enhance public awareness of this still under-recognized condition [6]. In this chapter, we present an overview of acute and chronic post-stroke aphasia (PSA) covering epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

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2 sg:chapterNumber Chapter 6
3 sg:copyrightHolder Springer Science+Business Media New York
4 sg:copyrightYear 2014
5 sg:ddsId b978-1-4614-7672-6_6
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14 sg:language En
15 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
16 sg:pageFirst 95
17 sg:pageLast 117
18 sg:scigraphId 56ca81d1cef594f8ce139f8f7485f0cc
19 sg:title Post-stroke Aphasia
20 sg:webpage https://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-1-4614-7672-6_6
21 rdf:type sg:BookChapter
22 rdfs:label BookChapter: Post-stroke Aphasia
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