COPYRIGHT YEAR

2009

AUTHORS

Melinda L. Jesus

TITLE

Acts of “Desicreation”: Urban Space and South Asian American Identity in Tanuja Desai Hidier’s Born Confused

ABSTRACT

Saris, mendhi, and bindi 1 —pop-culture icons Madonna and Gwen Stefani transformed these aspects of traditional Indian women’s culture into edgy, mainstream fashions available to all in trendy stores like Urban Outfitters and Target.2 But does mainstream America know any more about South Asian Americans beyond the character “Apu,” the convenience store owner on “The Simpsons”? According to the U.S. Census, South Asian Americans comprise 1.9 million of the 13–1 million Asian Americans in the United States today3 South Asian communities have existed in the United States since the nineteenth century, yet despite being the third largest Asian ethnic group in the United States (behind Chinese and Filipino Americans, respectively),5 South Asian Americans are largely invisible to mainstream America and are marginalized within current constructions of contemporary Asian America itself. Indeed, the rash of hate crimes that this community experienced—particularly Sikh Americans—post-9/11 clearly demonstrate how little the United States knows about the South Asian American. Stereotyped as “model minorities,” “unas- similable aliens,” and now terrorist threats, South Asian Americans remain simultaneously invisible yet hypervisible.7 Not surprisingly, South Asian American representation in contemporary children’s literature reflects these same realities.

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24 TRIPLES      24 PREDICATES      21 URIs      14 LITERALS

Subject Predicate Object
1 book-chapters:460d8a44a7c87e00824bfa2441353c6d sg:abstract Abstract Saris, mendhi, and bindi 1 —pop-culture icons Madonna and Gwen Stefani transformed these aspects of traditional Indian women’s culture into edgy, mainstream fashions available to all in trendy stores like Urban Outfitters and Target.2 But does mainstream America know any more about South Asian Americans beyond the character “Apu,” the convenience store owner on “The Simpsons”? According to the U.S. Census, South Asian Americans comprise 1.9 million of the 13–1 million Asian Americans in the United States today3 South Asian communities have existed in the United States since the nineteenth century, yet despite being the third largest Asian ethnic group in the United States (behind Chinese and Filipino Americans, respectively),5 South Asian Americans are largely invisible to mainstream America and are marginalized within current constructions of contemporary Asian America itself. Indeed, the rash of hate crimes that this community experienced—particularly Sikh Americans—post-9/11 clearly demonstrate how little the United States knows about the South Asian American. Stereotyped as “model minorities,” “unas- similable aliens,” and now terrorist threats, South Asian Americans remain simultaneously invisible yet hypervisible.7 Not surprisingly, South Asian American representation in contemporary children’s literature reflects these same realities.
2 sg:abstractRights OpenAccess
3 sg:bibliographyRights Restricted
4 sg:bodyHtmlRights Restricted
5 sg:bodyPdfRights Restricted
6 sg:chapterNumber Chapter 12
7 sg:copyrightHolder Michelle Pagni Stewart and Yvonne Atkinson
8 sg:copyrightYear 2009
9 sg:ddsId Chap12
10 sg:doi 10.1057/9780230101524_12
11 sg:esmRights OpenAccess
12 sg:hasBook books:4332386a36f2b9b5593dd0d73d113749
13 sg:hasBookEdition book-editions:6b5d69654dbd6387c9a9eb3e421d6b14
14 sg:hasContribution contributions:cbd3a24703d6fedc7e14a2492e479386
15 sg:language En
16 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
17 sg:metadataRights OpenAccess
18 sg:pageFirst 135
19 sg:pageLast 145
20 sg:scigraphId 460d8a44a7c87e00824bfa2441353c6d
21 sg:title Acts of “Desicreation”: Urban Space and South Asian American Identity in Tanuja Desai Hidier’s Born Confused
22 sg:webpage https://link.springer.com/10.1057/9780230101524_12
23 rdf:type sg:BookChapter
24 rdfs:label BookChapter: Acts of “Desicreation”: Urban Space and South Asian American Identity in Tanuja Desai Hidier’s Born Confused
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