PUBLICATION DATE

2002-09-01

TITLE

Aphasia severity: Association with cerebral perfusion and diffusion.

ISSUE

9

VOLUME

16

ISSN (print)

N/A

ISSN (electronic)

N/A

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the relationship between perfusion, diffusion, and stroke suggest that the extent of cerebral hypoperfusion may be a better indicator of neurological status than lesion size in the early phases of recovery. It is not clear how these factors are related to aphasia severity. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cerebral perfusion, diffusion, and aphasia severity in stroke. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; PROCEDURE: Nine participants were examined within 24 hours of stroke onset and six were re-examined at 1 month post stroke. The examination included administration of an aphasia test, a face recognition task, and a neuroimaging session including T2-, perfusion-, and diffusion-weighted MRI. OUTCOMES #ENTITYSTARTX00026; RESULTS: Participants with a variety of aphasia types and severity were included in the study. Visual inspection suggested larger perfusion abnormality than the actual lesion in eight of nine subjects at day 1. The correlation between aphasia severity and hypoperfusion was significant at day 1 and at 1 month post stroke. However, this was not the case for the relationship between aphasia severity and lesion size where the correlation was not statistically significant at day 1 or at 1 month post stroke. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that cerebral hypoperfusion is a more accurate indicator of aphasia severity in early stroke than lesion volume.

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    1 articles:eb3dc8455465c45e6d2a3995b8d88e7b sg:abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies of the relationship between perfusion, diffusion, and stroke suggest that the extent of cerebral hypoperfusion may be a better indicator of neurological status than lesion size in the early phases of recovery. It is not clear how these factors are related to aphasia severity. AIMS: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cerebral perfusion, diffusion, and aphasia severity in stroke. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; PROCEDURE: Nine participants were examined within 24 hours of stroke onset and six were re-examined at 1 month post stroke. The examination included administration of an aphasia test, a face recognition task, and a neuroimaging session including T2-, perfusion-, and diffusion-weighted MRI. OUTCOMES #ENTITYSTARTX00026; RESULTS: Participants with a variety of aphasia types and severity were included in the study. Visual inspection suggested larger perfusion abnormality than the actual lesion in eight of nine subjects at day 1. The correlation between aphasia severity and hypoperfusion was significant at day 1 and at 1 month post stroke. However, this was not the case for the relationship between aphasia severity and lesion size where the correlation was not statistically significant at day 1 or at 1 month post stroke. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that cerebral hypoperfusion is a more accurate indicator of aphasia severity in early stroke than lesion volume.
    2 sg:doi 10.1080/02687030244000347
    3 sg:doiLink http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02687030244000347
    4 sg:isFundedPublicationOf grants:f3fa6f279dc3e2ef4bc68dfc1c61988f
    5 sg:issue 9
    6 sg:language English
    7 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    8 sg:publicationDate 2002-09-01
    9 sg:publicationYear 2002
    10 sg:publicationYearMonth 2002-09
    11 sg:scigraphId eb3dc8455465c45e6d2a3995b8d88e7b
    12 sg:title Aphasia severity: Association with cerebral perfusion and diffusion.
    13 sg:volume 16
    14 rdf:type sg:Article
    15 rdfs:label Article: Aphasia severity: Association with cerebral perfusion and diffusion.
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