PUBLICATION DATE

2008-04

TITLE

Influence of American acculturation on cigarette smoking behaviors among Asian American subpopulations in California.

ISSUE

4

VOLUME

10

ISSN (print)

N/A

ISSN (electronic)

N/A

ABSTRACT

Using combined data from the population-based 2001 and 2003 California Health Interview Surveys, we examined ethnic and gender-specific smoking behaviors and the effect of three acculturation indicators on cigarette smoking behavior and quitting status among 8,192 Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese American men and women. After adjustment for potential confounders, current smoking prevalence was higher and the quit rate was lower for Korean, Filipino, and Vietnamese American men compared with Chinese American men. Women's current smoking prevalence was lower than men's in all six Asian American subgroups. South Asian and Korean American women reported lower quit rates than women from other ethnic subgroups. Asian American men who reported using only English at home had lower current smoking prevalence and higher quit rates, except for Filipino and South Asian American men. Asian American women who reported using only English at home had higher current smoking prevalence except for Japanese women. Being a second or later generation immigrant was associated with lower smoking prevalence among all Asian American subgroups of men. Less educated men and women had higher smoking prevalence and lower quit rates. In conclusion, both current smoking prevalence and quit rates vary distinctively across gender and ethnic subgroups among Asian Americans in California. Acculturation appears to increase the risk of cigarette smoking for Asian American women. Future tobacco-control programs should target at high-risk Asian American subgroups, defined by ethnicity, acculturation status, and gender.

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JOURNAL BRAND

N/A (note: articles not published by Springer Nature have limited metadata)


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    16 TRIPLES      14 PREDICATES      17 URIs      10 LITERALS

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    1 articles:a70dde6f7d0f13d96c895eaf81b78767 sg:abstract Using combined data from the population-based 2001 and 2003 California Health Interview Surveys, we examined ethnic and gender-specific smoking behaviors and the effect of three acculturation indicators on cigarette smoking behavior and quitting status among 8,192 Chinese, Filipino, South Asian, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese American men and women. After adjustment for potential confounders, current smoking prevalence was higher and the quit rate was lower for Korean, Filipino, and Vietnamese American men compared with Chinese American men. Women's current smoking prevalence was lower than men's in all six Asian American subgroups. South Asian and Korean American women reported lower quit rates than women from other ethnic subgroups. Asian American men who reported using only English at home had lower current smoking prevalence and higher quit rates, except for Filipino and South Asian American men. Asian American women who reported using only English at home had higher current smoking prevalence except for Japanese women. Being a second or later generation immigrant was associated with lower smoking prevalence among all Asian American subgroups of men. Less educated men and women had higher smoking prevalence and lower quit rates. In conclusion, both current smoking prevalence and quit rates vary distinctively across gender and ethnic subgroups among Asian Americans in California. Acculturation appears to increase the risk of cigarette smoking for Asian American women. Future tobacco-control programs should target at high-risk Asian American subgroups, defined by ethnicity, acculturation status, and gender.
    2 sg:doi 10.1080/14622200801979126
    3 sg:doiLink http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14622200801979126
    4 sg:isFundedPublicationOf grants:460bf12f3ac229c820f359dec790b4c3
    5 grants:52fa677db82279eeba87443a705ab770
    6 grants:a6b47982eabffd6fc074e5b1231b43df
    7 sg:issue 4
    8 sg:language English
    9 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    10 sg:publicationYear 2008
    11 sg:publicationYearMonth 2008-04
    12 sg:scigraphId a70dde6f7d0f13d96c895eaf81b78767
    13 sg:title Influence of American acculturation on cigarette smoking behaviors among Asian American subpopulations in California.
    14 sg:volume 10
    15 rdf:type sg:Article
    16 rdfs:label Article: Influence of American acculturation on cigarette smoking behaviors among Asian American subpopulations in California.
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