PUBLICATION DATE

1980-12

AUTHORS

Rance P. L. Lee

TITLE

Perceptions and uses of Chinese medicine among the chinese in Hong Kong

ISSUE

4

VOLUME

4

ISSN (print)

0165-005X

ISSN (electronic)

1573-076X

ABSTRACT

The present paper was based on both qualitative observations and quantitative survey data. Major findings are as follows: (1) The sacred or magical-religious tradition of Chinese medicine is accepted by a relatively small portion (roughly one-fifth) of the ordinary Chinese people in urban Hong Kong, and is relatively more popular among women or less educated people. (2) Both the classical-professional and the local-empirical traditions of secular medicine are resorted to by many Chinese people (over one half) either for treating diseases or for strengthening their constitution. The acceptance of secular Chinese medicine does not vary significantly among different sex, age, education, or income groups. It should be noted that secular Chinese medicine is often used in addition to or in combination with modern Western medicine. (3) It appears that most people are more confident in the Chinese medical tradition than in Chinese-style practitioners in Hong Kong, and that people's confidence in secular Chinese medicine has been increasing in recent years. (4) There are reasons for the confidence in secular Chinese medicine. Chinese medicine is generally perceived to be better than or as good as Western, scientific medicine in some ways, such as for tonic care, for fewer side effects, for curing the cause (not symptoms) of diseases, and for treating certain diseases. Therefore, to ordinary Chinese people, Chinese and Western medicine may perform either equivalent or complementary functions. (5) As regards the process of seeking medical care, most people seem to follow the pattern of moving from self-medication, using Chinese and/or Western home remedies, to Western-style doctors, to Chinese-style practitioners, and finally to a Western medical hospital. Policy and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

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1 articles:7250d0ac4ff964aa159ce55baf9fc5b1 sg:abstract Abstract The present paper was based on both qualitative observations and quantitative survey data. Major findings are as follows: (1) The sacred or magical-religious tradition of Chinese medicine is accepted by a relatively small portion (roughly one-fifth) of the ordinary Chinese people in urban Hong Kong, and is relatively more popular among women or less educated people. (2) Both the classical-professional and the local-empirical traditions of secular medicine are resorted to by many Chinese people (over one half) either for treating diseases or for strengthening their constitution. The acceptance of secular Chinese medicine does not vary significantly among different sex, age, education, or income groups. It should be noted that secular Chinese medicine is often used in addition to or in combination with modern Western medicine. (3) It appears that most people are more confident in the Chinese medical tradition than in Chinese-style practitioners in Hong Kong, and that people's confidence in secular Chinese medicine has been increasing in recent years. (4) There are reasons for the confidence in secular Chinese medicine. Chinese medicine is generally perceived to be better than or as good as Western, scientific medicine in some ways, such as for tonic care, for fewer side effects, for curing the cause (not symptoms) of diseases, and for treating certain diseases. Therefore, to ordinary Chinese people, Chinese and Western medicine may perform either equivalent or complementary functions. (5) As regards the process of seeking medical care, most people seem to follow the pattern of moving from self-medication, using Chinese and/or Western home remedies, to Western-style doctors, to Chinese-style practitioners, and finally to a Western medical hospital. Policy and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
2 sg:articleType OriginalPaper
3 sg:coverYear 1980
4 sg:coverYearMonth 1980-12
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7 sg:doi 10.1007/BF00051811
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19 sg:issnPrint 0165-005X
20 sg:issue 4
21 sg:language English
22 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
23 sg:pageEnd 375
24 sg:pageStart 345
25 sg:publicationYear 1980
26 sg:publicationYearMonth 1980-12
27 sg:scigraphId 7250d0ac4ff964aa159ce55baf9fc5b1
28 sg:title Perceptions and uses of Chinese medicine among the chinese in Hong Kong
29 sg:volume 4
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32 rdfs:label Article: Perceptions and uses of Chinese medicine among the chinese in Hong Kong
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