PUBLICATION DATE

1944-11-11

AUTHORS

FRANS VERDOORN

TITLE

Future of Biology in World Affairs*

ISSUE

3915

VOLUME

154

ISSN (print)

0028-0836

ISSN (electronic)

N/A

ABSTRACT

DURING the last months of the War of 1914–18, a period which—from many points of view–may be compared with the present, the plant scientists and zoologists of the world were less involved in the war effort than they are to-day. Nevertheless, as such addresses and papers as Lyman's "Contributions of American Botanists for More Active Prosecution of War Work" (1918) and Stevens's "American Botanists and the War" (1918) show, some of the foremost plant scientists of the United States were prevailing upon their colleagues to engage in activities which might help the war effort. At the same time much consideration was given to the War from a biological point of view, as such publications as Nicolai's "Biology of War"(1919) and Pearl's "Biology and War"(1918) testify. Just before the end of the War many interesting papers on the role of botany and biology in the post-war world were published. These included "Botany as a National Asset" (Coulter, 1917) and "Botany after the War" (Davis, 1918), and were followed by an unusual number of inspired discussions by men like Lyman, Peirce and Gager. Though during those years a number of biologists did accomplish useful things in such fields as pioneering in dehydration, raising the agricultural output and discovering substitutes of vegetable origin, the foremost trend of thought, especially in the Allied countries, was concerned with biology in the post-war world, in human relations as well as in agriculture, etc. The Germans of that time were, comparatively, much more concerned with problems directly relating to the war effort than were their colleagues in the Allied countries. Diels wrote an entire volume on botanical substitutes; Haber and other chemists revolutionized the fertilizer situation.

Related objects

JOURNAL BRAND

  • Nature

  • FIELD OF RESEARCH CODES

  • History And Archaeology
  • Historical Studies

  • How to use: Click on a object to move its position. Double click to open its homepage. Right click to preview its contents.

    Download the RDF metadata as:   json-ld nt turtle xml License info


    27 TRIPLES      26 PREDICATES      25 URIs      15 LITERALS

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 articles:3639c77d207735a634de73d89ff8035e sg:abstract DURING the last months of the War of 1914–18, a period which—from many points of view–may be compared with the present, the plant scientists and zoologists of the world were less involved in the war effort than they are to-day. Nevertheless, as such addresses and papers as Lyman's "Contributions of American Botanists for More Active Prosecution of War Work" (1918) and Stevens's "American Botanists and the War" (1918) show, some of the foremost plant scientists of the United States were prevailing upon their colleagues to engage in activities which might help the war effort. At the same time much consideration was given to the War from a biological point of view, as such publications as Nicolai's "Biology of War"(1919) and Pearl's "Biology and War"(1918) testify. Just before the end of the War many interesting papers on the role of botany and biology in the post-war world were published. These included "Botany as a National Asset" (Coulter, 1917) and "Botany after the War" (Davis, 1918), and were followed by an unusual number of inspired discussions by men like Lyman, Peirce and Gager. Though during those years a number of biologists did accomplish useful things in such fields as pioneering in dehydration, raising the agricultural output and discovering substitutes of vegetable origin, the foremost trend of thought, especially in the Allied countries, was concerned with biology in the post-war world, in human relations as well as in agriculture, etc. The Germans of that time were, comparatively, much more concerned with problems directly relating to the war effort than were their colleagues in the Allied countries. Diels wrote an entire volume on botanical substitutes; Haber and other chemists revolutionized the fertilizer situation.
    2 sg:coverDate 1944-11-11
    3 sg:coverYear 1944
    4 sg:coverYearMonth 1944-11
    5 sg:ddsIdJournalBrand 41586
    6 sg:doi 10.1038/154595a0
    7 sg:doiLink http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/154595a0
    8 sg:hasArticleType article-types:news
    9 sg:hasContribution contributions:ee466c22761e3aa782fb807be8ece345
    10 sg:hasFieldOfResearchCode anzsrc-for:21
    11 anzsrc-for:2103
    12 sg:hasJournal journals:5ea8996a5bb089dd0562d3bfe24eaad9
    13 sg:hasJournalBrand journal-brands:012496b06989edb434c6b8e1d0b0a7db
    14 sg:issnPrint 0028-0836
    15 sg:issue 3915
    16 sg:license http://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    17 sg:npgId 154595a0
    18 sg:pageEnd 599
    19 sg:pageStart 595
    20 sg:publicationDate 1944-11-11
    21 sg:publicationYear 1944
    22 sg:publicationYearMonth 1944-11
    23 sg:scigraphId 3639c77d207735a634de73d89ff8035e
    24 sg:title Future of Biology in World Affairs*
    25 sg:volume 154
    26 rdf:type sg:Article
    27 rdfs:label Article: Future of Biology in World Affairs*
    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular JSON format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/articles/3639c77d207735a634de73d89ff8035e'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations .

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/articles/3639c77d207735a634de73d89ff8035e'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/articles/3639c77d207735a634de73d89ff8035e'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'http://scigraph.springernature.com/things/articles/3639c77d207735a634de73d89ff8035e'






    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...