Physical Activity View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2005-01-01

AUTHORS

Frank W. Booth , P. Darrell Neufer

ABSTRACT

The successful coordination of hundreds of biological processes that allow the unanesthetized human to undergo maximal aerobic work is one of the elegant marvels in modern biology. It is difficult to identify other examples of normal function that are more complex in integrative or systems biology. Aerobic physical activity has long been recognized as producing a high metabolic state that can exceed approx 25 times resting metabolism in worldclass athletes. It is no wonder, then, that the coordination of multiple processes is required. Even the average individual increases metabolic rate four- to eightfold in a slow run. Great strides have been made in deciphering the intercommunications among systems, organs/tissues, cells, organelles, genes, and molecules to support the many-fold increase in metabolic demand imposed by physical activity. Numerous factors, such as autonomic nervous system activity, the rate of blood flow, the delivery of a complex mix of substrates and hormones in the plasma, and elimination of metabolic byproducts such as heat and carbon dioxide, contribute to the complexity of the required integration that enables moderate-intensity exercise to occur without harm in an individual accustomed to physical activity. Attempting to understand how all these factors converge, regulate, and then minimize the disruption in homeostasis is a prime example of integrative physiology. The curious biologist can only be awed by the physiological complexity of how the human body is able to support physical activity. More... »

PAGES

149-167

Book

TITLE

Integrative Physiology in the Proteomics and Post-Genomics Age

ISBN

978-1-58829-315-2
978-1-59259-925-7

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1385/1-59259-925-7:149

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-925-7:149

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035007240


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