Establishment of Experimental Biofilms Using the Modified Robbins Device and Flow Cells View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1999-01-21

AUTHORS

Luanne Hall-Stoodley , Joanna C. Rayner , Paul Stoodley , Hilary M. Lappin-Scott

ABSTRACT

Recent studies have shown that biofilms (a complex organization of bacterial cells present at a surface or interface, which produces a slime-like matrix) represent the principal form of bacterial growth in all environments studied to date (1). There are numerous advantages to bacteria growing in biofilms. These include extended protection against environmental changes, antimicrobial agents such as chemical disinfectants and antibiotics (2) and grazing predators such as amebae (3), as well as providing increased access to limited nutrients (4). Biofilms are of interest in medical, industrial, and natural environments for several reasons. For example, they can act as reservoirs from which the dissemination of pathogens may occur. Legionella pneumophila has been shown to be harbored within biofilms formed within drinking water pipelines (5). Similarly, it is well established that biofilms can colonize numerous types of medical implants (6). In industrial systems, detrimental effects may occur following biofilm growth such as reductions in heat-transfer efficiency and flow capacity. Biofouling may also markedly increase corrosion (7). Finally, biofilms represent a bacterial architecture that may support genetic transfer, nutrient utilization, and biodegradation (8). More... »

PAGES

307-319

Book

TITLE

Environmental Monitoring of Bacteria

ISBN

978-0-89603-566-9
978-1-59259-487-0

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1385/0-89603-566-2:307

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/0-89603-566-2:307

DIMENSIONS

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