Evolutionary transitions in diet influence the exceptional diversification of a lizard adaptive radiation View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2022-06-07

AUTHORS

Mauricio Ocampo, Daniel Pincheira-Donoso, Ferran Sayol, Rodrigo S. Rios

ABSTRACT

BackgroundDiet is a key component of a species ecological niche and plays critical roles in guiding the trajectories of evolutionary change. Previous studies suggest that dietary evolution can influence the rates and patterns of species diversification, with omnivorous (animal and plant, ‘generalist’) diets slowing down diversification compared to more restricted (‘specialist’) herbivorous and carnivorous diets. This hypothesis, here termed the “dietary macroevolutionary sink” hypothesis (DMS), predicts that transitions to omnivorous diets occur at higher rates than into any specialist diet, and omnivores are expected to have the lowest diversification rates, causing an evolutionary sink into a single type of diet. However, evidence for the DMS hypothesis remains conflicting. Here, we present the first test of the DMS hypothesis in a lineage of ectothermic tetrapods—the prolific Liolaemidae lizard radiation from South America.ResultsAncestral reconstructions suggest that the stem ancestor was probably insectivorous. The best supported trait model is a diet-dependent speciation rate, with independent extinction rates. Herbivory has the highest net diversification rate, omnivory ranks second, and insectivory has the lowest. The extinction rate is the same for all three diet types and is much lower than the speciation rates. The highest transition rate was from omnivory to insectivory, and the lowest transition rates were between insectivory and herbivory.ConclusionsOur findings challenge the core prediction of the DMS hypothesis that generalist diets represent an ‘evolutionary sink’. Interestingly, liolaemid lizards have rapidly and successfully proliferated across some of the world’s coldest climates (at high elevations and latitudes), where species have evolved mixed arthropod-plant (omnivore) or predominantly herbivore diets. This longstanding observation is consistent with the higher net diversification rates found in both herbivory and omnivory. Collectively, just like the evolution of viviparity has been regarded as a ‘key adaptation’ during the liolaemid radiation across cold climates, our findings suggest that transitions from insectivory to herbivory (bridged by omnivory) are likely to have played a role as an additional key adaptation underlying the exceptional diversification of these reptiles across extreme climates. More... »

PAGES

74

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2020-03-31. Disparate Patterns of Diversification Within Liolaemini Lizards in NEOTROPICAL DIVERSIFICATION: PATTERNS AND PROCESSES
  • 2006-02-23. SIMMAP: Stochastic character mapping of discrete traits on phylogenies in BMC BIOINFORMATICS
  • 2011-02-25. Exceptionally preserved plant parenchyma in the digestive tract indicates a herbivorous diet in the Middle Eocene bird Strigogyps sapea (Ameghinornithidae) in PALZ
  • 2018-02-06. Macroevolutionary diversification with limited niche disparity in a species-rich lineage of cold-climate lizards in BMC ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
  • 2016-04-07. Omnivory in birds is a macroevolutionary sink in NATURE COMMUNICATIONS
  • 2020-01-13. Macroevolutionary convergence connects morphological form to ecological function in birds in NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION
  • 2017-11-17. Slow life histories in lizards living in the highlands of the Andes Mountains in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY B
  • 2015-08-07. What defines an adaptive radiation? Macroevolutionary diversification dynamics of an exceptionally species-rich continental lizard radiation in BMC ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
  • 2017-10-09. The global distribution of tetrapods reveals a need for targeted reptile conservation in NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION
  • 2010-11-10. Energetics in Liolaemini lizards: implications of a small body size and ecological conservatism in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY B
  • 2008-02-27. The evolution of body size under environmental gradients in ectotherms: why should Bergmann's rule apply to lizards? in BMC ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1148497765

    PUBMED

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35672668


    Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
    Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

    JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Biological Sciences", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Ecology", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0603", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Evolutionary Biology", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0604", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Genetics", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
            "name": "Animals", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
            "name": "Diet", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
            "name": "Ecosystem", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
            "name": "Herbivory", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
            "name": "Lizards", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
            "name": "Phylogeny", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "author": [
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Unidad de Zoolog\u00eda, Instituto de Ecolog\u00eda, Universidad Mayor de San Andr\u00e9s, Casilla 10077-Correo Central, La Paz, Bolivia", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.10421.36", 
              "name": [
                "Departamento de Biolog\u00eda, Doctorado en Ciencias Biol\u00f3gicas, Ecolog\u00eda de Zonas \u00c1ridas (EZA), Universidad de la Serena, Casilla 554, La Serena, Chile", 
                "Red de Investigadores en Herpetolog\u00eda-Bolivia, Los Pinos Zona Sur, Av. Jos\u00e9 Aguirre 260, La Paz, Bolivia", 
                "Unidad de Zoolog\u00eda, Instituto de Ecolog\u00eda, Universidad Mayor de San Andr\u00e9s, Casilla 10077-Correo Central, La Paz, Bolivia"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Ocampo", 
            "givenName": "Mauricio", 
            "id": "sg:person.013056413006.40", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013056413006.40"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "MacroBiodiversity Lab, School of Biological Sciences, Queen\u2019s University Belfast, 19 Chlorine Gardens, BT9 5DL, Belfast, UK", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.4777.3", 
              "name": [
                "MacroBiodiversity Lab, School of Biological Sciences, Queen\u2019s University Belfast, 19 Chlorine Gardens, BT9 5DL, Belfast, UK"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Pincheira-Donoso", 
            "givenName": "Daniel", 
            "id": "sg:person.01105765020.33", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01105765020.33"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.83440.3b", 
              "name": [
                "Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Sayol", 
            "givenName": "Ferran", 
            "id": "sg:person.01172756543.32", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01172756543.32"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Instituto de Investigaci\u00f3n Multidisciplinario en Ciencia y Tecnolog\u00eda, Universidad de La Serena, La Serena, Chile", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.19208.32", 
              "name": [
                "Departamento de Biolog\u00eda, Doctorado en Ciencias Biol\u00f3gicas, Ecolog\u00eda de Zonas \u00c1ridas (EZA), Universidad de la Serena, Casilla 554, La Serena, Chile", 
                "Instituto de Investigaci\u00f3n Multidisciplinario en Ciencia y Tecnolog\u00eda, Universidad de La Serena, La Serena, Chile"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Rios", 
            "givenName": "Rodrigo S.", 
            "id": "sg:person.0616667402.23", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0616667402.23"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }
        ], 
        "citation": [
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms11250", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009085565", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11250"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/s41559-017-0332-2", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1092102074", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-017-0332-2"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2148-8-68", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033681137", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-8-68"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s12542-010-0094-5", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043244318", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s12542-010-0094-5"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00360-010-0524-4", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013060071", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00360-010-0524-4"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2105-7-88", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029773857", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-7-88"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-030-31167-4_28", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1125986887", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-31167-4_28"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-018-1133-1", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1100856953", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-018-1133-1"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-015-0435-9", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021589041", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-015-0435-9"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00360-017-1136-z", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1092752388", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00360-017-1136-z"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/s41559-019-1070-4", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1124048874", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-1070-4"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }
        ], 
        "datePublished": "2022-06-07", 
        "datePublishedReg": "2022-06-07", 
        "description": "BackgroundDiet is a key component of a species ecological niche and plays critical roles in guiding the trajectories of evolutionary change. Previous studies suggest that dietary evolution can influence the rates and patterns of species diversification, with omnivorous (animal and plant, \u2018generalist\u2019) diets slowing down diversification compared to more restricted (\u2018specialist\u2019) herbivorous and carnivorous diets. This hypothesis, here termed the \u201cdietary macroevolutionary sink\u201d hypothesis (DMS), predicts that transitions to omnivorous diets occur at higher rates than into any specialist diet, and omnivores are expected to have the lowest diversification rates, causing an evolutionary sink into a single type of diet. However, evidence for the DMS hypothesis remains conflicting. Here, we present the first test of the DMS hypothesis in a lineage of ectothermic tetrapods\u2014the prolific Liolaemidae lizard radiation from South America.ResultsAncestral reconstructions suggest that the stem ancestor was probably insectivorous. The best supported trait model is a diet-dependent speciation rate, with independent extinction rates. Herbivory has the highest net diversification rate, omnivory ranks second, and insectivory has the lowest. The extinction rate is the same for all three diet types and is much lower than the speciation rates. The highest transition rate was from omnivory to insectivory, and the lowest transition rates were between insectivory and herbivory.ConclusionsOur findings challenge the core prediction of the DMS hypothesis that generalist diets represent an \u2018evolutionary sink\u2019. Interestingly, liolaemid lizards have rapidly and successfully proliferated across some of the world\u2019s coldest climates (at high elevations and latitudes), where species have evolved mixed arthropod-plant (omnivore) or predominantly herbivore diets. This longstanding observation is consistent with the higher net diversification rates found in both herbivory and omnivory. Collectively, just like the evolution of viviparity has been regarded as a \u2018key adaptation\u2019 during the liolaemid radiation across cold climates, our findings suggest that transitions from insectivory to herbivory (bridged by omnivory) are likely to have played a role as an additional key adaptation underlying the exceptional diversification of these reptiles across extreme climates.", 
        "genre": "article", 
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3", 
        "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
        "isPartOf": [
          {
            "id": "sg:journal.1024249", 
            "issn": [
              "2730-7182"
            ], 
            "name": "BMC Ecology and Evolution", 
            "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
            "type": "Periodical"
          }, 
          {
            "issueNumber": "1", 
            "type": "PublicationIssue"
          }, 
          {
            "type": "PublicationVolume", 
            "volumeNumber": "22"
          }
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "higher net diversification rates", 
          "net diversification rates", 
          "diversification rates", 
          "exceptional diversification", 
          "speciation rates", 
          "extinction rates", 
          "key adaptation", 
          "evolution of viviparity", 
          "lower diversification rates", 
          "species' ecological niche", 
          "lizard radiation", 
          "species diversification", 
          "adaptive radiation", 
          "liolaemid lizards", 
          "generalist diet", 
          "evolutionary transitions", 
          "specialist diet", 
          "ecological niches", 
          "evolutionary change", 
          "dietary evolution", 
          "herbivory", 
          "stem ancestors", 
          "carnivorous diet", 
          "ectothermic tetrapods", 
          "omnivory", 
          "insectivory", 
          "omnivorous diet", 
          "cold climates", 
          "diversification", 
          "South America", 
          "longstanding observation", 
          "critical role", 
          "higher transition rates", 
          "diet influences", 
          "diet type", 
          "viviparity", 
          "lizards", 
          "reptiles", 
          "extreme climate", 
          "lineages", 
          "ancestor", 
          "adaptation", 
          "omnivores", 
          "tetrapods", 
          "niche", 
          "lower transition rates", 
          "core predictions", 
          "key component", 
          "species", 
          "hypothesis", 
          "evolution", 
          "role", 
          "single type", 
          "climate", 
          "diet", 
          "previous studies", 
          "trait model", 
          "sink", 
          "ConclusionsOur findings", 
          "America", 
          "patterns", 
          "types", 
          "high rate", 
          "findings", 
          "radiation", 
          "evidence", 
          "components", 
          "transition", 
          "rate", 
          "changes", 
          "study", 
          "observations", 
          "first test", 
          "transition rates", 
          "prediction", 
          "reconstruction", 
          "influence", 
          "model", 
          "trajectories", 
          "BackgroundDiet", 
          "test"
        ], 
        "name": "Evolutionary transitions in diet influence the exceptional diversification of a lizard adaptive radiation", 
        "pagination": "74", 
        "productId": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "pub.1148497765"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "doi", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "pubmed_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "35672668"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3", 
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1148497765"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "articles", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2022-09-02T16:08", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220902/entities/gbq_results/article/article_945.jsonl", 
        "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    250 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      125 URIs      104 LITERALS      13 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3 schema:about N5bc114ccf50c47949e188483ed55250a
    2 N83da6d1c89314fb8801e6fd5773104d2
    3 N90aab65d559b4a5286a5736e5f336ed0
    4 N93b77d1ac08449d1b166bffc3ca8a1ff
    5 Nb5902b97a36943a6914356f49f781e09
    6 Nfd965553c5d24663876163dd96cf7513
    7 anzsrc-for:06
    8 anzsrc-for:0602
    9 anzsrc-for:0603
    10 anzsrc-for:0604
    11 schema:author Nc2494e68c5504108a793f9ee2a21bb0f
    12 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-030-31167-4_28
    13 sg:pub.10.1007/s00360-010-0524-4
    14 sg:pub.10.1007/s00360-017-1136-z
    15 sg:pub.10.1007/s12542-010-0094-5
    16 sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms11250
    17 sg:pub.10.1038/s41559-017-0332-2
    18 sg:pub.10.1038/s41559-019-1070-4
    19 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2105-7-88
    20 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2148-8-68
    21 sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-015-0435-9
    22 sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-018-1133-1
    23 schema:datePublished 2022-06-07
    24 schema:datePublishedReg 2022-06-07
    25 schema:description BackgroundDiet is a key component of a species ecological niche and plays critical roles in guiding the trajectories of evolutionary change. Previous studies suggest that dietary evolution can influence the rates and patterns of species diversification, with omnivorous (animal and plant, ‘generalist’) diets slowing down diversification compared to more restricted (‘specialist’) herbivorous and carnivorous diets. This hypothesis, here termed the “dietary macroevolutionary sink” hypothesis (DMS), predicts that transitions to omnivorous diets occur at higher rates than into any specialist diet, and omnivores are expected to have the lowest diversification rates, causing an evolutionary sink into a single type of diet. However, evidence for the DMS hypothesis remains conflicting. Here, we present the first test of the DMS hypothesis in a lineage of ectothermic tetrapods—the prolific Liolaemidae lizard radiation from South America.ResultsAncestral reconstructions suggest that the stem ancestor was probably insectivorous. The best supported trait model is a diet-dependent speciation rate, with independent extinction rates. Herbivory has the highest net diversification rate, omnivory ranks second, and insectivory has the lowest. The extinction rate is the same for all three diet types and is much lower than the speciation rates. The highest transition rate was from omnivory to insectivory, and the lowest transition rates were between insectivory and herbivory.ConclusionsOur findings challenge the core prediction of the DMS hypothesis that generalist diets represent an ‘evolutionary sink’. Interestingly, liolaemid lizards have rapidly and successfully proliferated across some of the world’s coldest climates (at high elevations and latitudes), where species have evolved mixed arthropod-plant (omnivore) or predominantly herbivore diets. This longstanding observation is consistent with the higher net diversification rates found in both herbivory and omnivory. Collectively, just like the evolution of viviparity has been regarded as a ‘key adaptation’ during the liolaemid radiation across cold climates, our findings suggest that transitions from insectivory to herbivory (bridged by omnivory) are likely to have played a role as an additional key adaptation underlying the exceptional diversification of these reptiles across extreme climates.
    26 schema:genre article
    27 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
    28 schema:isPartOf N9b28b49f1c98435199d881099fbaa284
    29 Nd219230d6e644682b34ad192ae6d2112
    30 sg:journal.1024249
    31 schema:keywords America
    32 BackgroundDiet
    33 ConclusionsOur findings
    34 South America
    35 adaptation
    36 adaptive radiation
    37 ancestor
    38 carnivorous diet
    39 changes
    40 climate
    41 cold climates
    42 components
    43 core predictions
    44 critical role
    45 diet
    46 diet influences
    47 diet type
    48 dietary evolution
    49 diversification
    50 diversification rates
    51 ecological niches
    52 ectothermic tetrapods
    53 evidence
    54 evolution
    55 evolution of viviparity
    56 evolutionary change
    57 evolutionary transitions
    58 exceptional diversification
    59 extinction rates
    60 extreme climate
    61 findings
    62 first test
    63 generalist diet
    64 herbivory
    65 high rate
    66 higher net diversification rates
    67 higher transition rates
    68 hypothesis
    69 influence
    70 insectivory
    71 key adaptation
    72 key component
    73 lineages
    74 liolaemid lizards
    75 lizard radiation
    76 lizards
    77 longstanding observation
    78 lower diversification rates
    79 lower transition rates
    80 model
    81 net diversification rates
    82 niche
    83 observations
    84 omnivores
    85 omnivorous diet
    86 omnivory
    87 patterns
    88 prediction
    89 previous studies
    90 radiation
    91 rate
    92 reconstruction
    93 reptiles
    94 role
    95 single type
    96 sink
    97 specialist diet
    98 speciation rates
    99 species
    100 species diversification
    101 species' ecological niche
    102 stem ancestors
    103 study
    104 test
    105 tetrapods
    106 trait model
    107 trajectories
    108 transition
    109 transition rates
    110 types
    111 viviparity
    112 schema:name Evolutionary transitions in diet influence the exceptional diversification of a lizard adaptive radiation
    113 schema:pagination 74
    114 schema:productId N2f2c48cdcac748d4bb1c9c4aa02dcdc3
    115 N50ebe45da1f14b64a113ff9cd0a39916
    116 Nde7586be62d04d51b37292b523bca889
    117 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1148497765
    118 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3
    119 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-09-02T16:08
    120 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    121 schema:sdPublisher N74faef57e1114bbca52dde522d0970f7
    122 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3
    123 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    124 sgo:sdDataset articles
    125 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
    126 N15ea04840fea449793df11f24ae73982 rdf:first sg:person.0616667402.23
    127 rdf:rest rdf:nil
    128 N2f2c48cdcac748d4bb1c9c4aa02dcdc3 schema:name dimensions_id
    129 schema:value pub.1148497765
    130 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    131 N49fee3fcee10449c9e3027f9122ba223 rdf:first sg:person.01105765020.33
    132 rdf:rest N8bc866e64da641b6b9bcfd613a84abe6
    133 N50ebe45da1f14b64a113ff9cd0a39916 schema:name pubmed_id
    134 schema:value 35672668
    135 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    136 N5bc114ccf50c47949e188483ed55250a schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
    137 schema:name Lizards
    138 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    139 N74faef57e1114bbca52dde522d0970f7 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    140 rdf:type schema:Organization
    141 N83da6d1c89314fb8801e6fd5773104d2 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
    142 schema:name Animals
    143 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    144 N8bc866e64da641b6b9bcfd613a84abe6 rdf:first sg:person.01172756543.32
    145 rdf:rest N15ea04840fea449793df11f24ae73982
    146 N90aab65d559b4a5286a5736e5f336ed0 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
    147 schema:name Herbivory
    148 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    149 N93b77d1ac08449d1b166bffc3ca8a1ff schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
    150 schema:name Diet
    151 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    152 N9b28b49f1c98435199d881099fbaa284 schema:issueNumber 1
    153 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
    154 Nb5902b97a36943a6914356f49f781e09 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
    155 schema:name Ecosystem
    156 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    157 Nc2494e68c5504108a793f9ee2a21bb0f rdf:first sg:person.013056413006.40
    158 rdf:rest N49fee3fcee10449c9e3027f9122ba223
    159 Nd219230d6e644682b34ad192ae6d2112 schema:volumeNumber 22
    160 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
    161 Nde7586be62d04d51b37292b523bca889 schema:name doi
    162 schema:value 10.1186/s12862-022-02028-3
    163 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    164 Nfd965553c5d24663876163dd96cf7513 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
    165 schema:name Phylogeny
    166 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    167 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    168 schema:name Biological Sciences
    169 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    170 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    171 schema:name Ecology
    172 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    173 anzsrc-for:0603 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    174 schema:name Evolutionary Biology
    175 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    176 anzsrc-for:0604 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    177 schema:name Genetics
    178 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    179 sg:journal.1024249 schema:issn 2730-7182
    180 schema:name BMC Ecology and Evolution
    181 schema:publisher Springer Nature
    182 rdf:type schema:Periodical
    183 sg:person.01105765020.33 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.4777.3
    184 schema:familyName Pincheira-Donoso
    185 schema:givenName Daniel
    186 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01105765020.33
    187 rdf:type schema:Person
    188 sg:person.01172756543.32 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.83440.3b
    189 schema:familyName Sayol
    190 schema:givenName Ferran
    191 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01172756543.32
    192 rdf:type schema:Person
    193 sg:person.013056413006.40 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.10421.36
    194 schema:familyName Ocampo
    195 schema:givenName Mauricio
    196 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013056413006.40
    197 rdf:type schema:Person
    198 sg:person.0616667402.23 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.19208.32
    199 schema:familyName Rios
    200 schema:givenName Rodrigo S.
    201 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0616667402.23
    202 rdf:type schema:Person
    203 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-030-31167-4_28 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1125986887
    204 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-31167-4_28
    205 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    206 sg:pub.10.1007/s00360-010-0524-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013060071
    207 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00360-010-0524-4
    208 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    209 sg:pub.10.1007/s00360-017-1136-z schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1092752388
    210 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00360-017-1136-z
    211 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    212 sg:pub.10.1007/s12542-010-0094-5 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1043244318
    213 https://doi.org/10.1007/s12542-010-0094-5
    214 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    215 sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms11250 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1009085565
    216 https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11250
    217 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    218 sg:pub.10.1038/s41559-017-0332-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1092102074
    219 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-017-0332-2
    220 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    221 sg:pub.10.1038/s41559-019-1070-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1124048874
    222 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-1070-4
    223 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    224 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2105-7-88 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029773857
    225 https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-7-88
    226 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    227 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2148-8-68 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033681137
    228 https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-8-68
    229 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    230 sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-015-0435-9 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021589041
    231 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-015-0435-9
    232 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    233 sg:pub.10.1186/s12862-018-1133-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1100856953
    234 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12862-018-1133-1
    235 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    236 grid-institutes:grid.10421.36 schema:alternateName Unidad de Zoología, Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, Casilla 10077-Correo Central, La Paz, Bolivia
    237 schema:name Departamento de Biología, Doctorado en Ciencias Biológicas, Ecología de Zonas Áridas (EZA), Universidad de la Serena, Casilla 554, La Serena, Chile
    238 Red de Investigadores en Herpetología-Bolivia, Los Pinos Zona Sur, Av. José Aguirre 260, La Paz, Bolivia
    239 Unidad de Zoología, Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, Casilla 10077-Correo Central, La Paz, Bolivia
    240 rdf:type schema:Organization
    241 grid-institutes:grid.19208.32 schema:alternateName Instituto de Investigación Multidisciplinario en Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad de La Serena, La Serena, Chile
    242 schema:name Departamento de Biología, Doctorado en Ciencias Biológicas, Ecología de Zonas Áridas (EZA), Universidad de la Serena, Casilla 554, La Serena, Chile
    243 Instituto de Investigación Multidisciplinario en Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad de La Serena, La Serena, Chile
    244 rdf:type schema:Organization
    245 grid-institutes:grid.4777.3 schema:alternateName MacroBiodiversity Lab, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, 19 Chlorine Gardens, BT9 5DL, Belfast, UK
    246 schema:name MacroBiodiversity Lab, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, 19 Chlorine Gardens, BT9 5DL, Belfast, UK
    247 rdf:type schema:Organization
    248 grid-institutes:grid.83440.3b schema:alternateName Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK
    249 schema:name Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, UK
    250 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...