An economic perspective on personalized medicine View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2013-12

AUTHORS

Sairamesh Jakka, Michael Rossbach

ABSTRACT

The concept of personalized medicine not only promises to enhance the life of patients and increase the quality of clinical practice and targeted care pathways, but also to lower overall healthcare costs through early-detection, prevention, accurate risk assessments and efficiencies in care delivery. Current inefficiencies are widely regarded as substantial enough to have a significant impact on the economies of major nations like the US and China, and, therefore the world economy. A recent OECD report estimates healthcare expenditure for some of the developed western and eastern nations to be anywhere from 10% to 18%, and growing (with the US at the highest). Personalized medicine aims to use state-of-the-art genomic technologies, rich medical record data, tissue and blood banks and clinical knowledge that will allow clinicians and payors to tailor treatments to individuals, thereby greatly reducing the costs of ineffective therapies incurred through the current trial and error clinical paradigm. Pivotal to the field are drugs that have been designed to target a specific molecular pathway that has gone wrong and results in a diseased condition and the diagnostic tests that allow clinicians to separate responders from non-responders. However, the truly personalized approach in medicine faces two major problems: complex biology and complex economics; the pathways involved in diseases are quite often not well understood, and most targeted drugs are very expensive. As a result of all current efforts to translate the concepts of personalized healthcare into the clinic, personalized medicine becomes participatory and this implies patient decisions about their own health. Such a new paradigm requires powerful tools to handle significant amounts of personal information with the approach to be known as “P4 medicine”, that is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory. P4 medicine promises to increase the quality of clinical care and treatments and will ultimately save costs. The greatest challenges are economic, not scientific. More... »

PAGES

1

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1877-6566-7-1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1877-6566-7-1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013620828


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