Case Report: Successful non-operative management of spontaneous splenic rupture in a patient with babesiosis View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2011-01-20

AUTHORS

William D Tobler, Deborah Cotton, Timothy Lepore, Suresh Agarwal, Eric J Mahoney

ABSTRACT

BackgroundBabesiosis is a zoonotic disease transmitted by the Ixodes tick species. Infection often results in sub-clinical manifestations; however, patients with this disease can become critically ill. Splenic rupture has been a previously reported complication of babesiosis, but treatment has always led to splenectomy. Asplenia places a patient at greater risk for overwhelming post-splenectomy infection from encapsulated bacteria, Lyme disease, Ehrlichia as well as Babesia microti. Therefore, avoiding splenectomy in these patients must be considered by the physician; particularly, if the patient is at risk for re-infection by living in an endemic area.Case PresentationA 54 year-old male from the northeast United States presented with left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with fever, chills, night sweats and nausea. A full evaluation revealed active infection with Babesia microti and multiple splenic lacerations. This patient was successfully treated with appropriate pharmacological therapy and non-operative observation for the splenic injury.ConclusionPatients diagnosed with Babesia microti infection are becoming more common, especially in endemic areas. Although clinical manifestations are usually minimal, this infection can present with significant injuries leading to critical illness. We present the successful non-operative treatment of a patient with splenic rupture due to babesiosis infection. More... »

PAGES

4

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2007-06-22. First confirmed autochthonous case of human Babesia microti infection in Europe in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY & INFECTIOUS DISEASES
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1749-7922-6-4

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1749-7922-6-4

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019989197

    PUBMED

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21251311


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