Process evaluation of appreciative inquiry to translate pain management evidence into pediatric nursing practice View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2010-11-20

AUTHORS

Tricia Kavanagh, Bonnie Stevens, Kate Seers, Souraya Sidani, Judy Watt-Watson

ABSTRACT

BackgroundAppreciative inquiry (AI) is an innovative knowledge translation (KT) intervention that is compatible with the Promoting Action on Research in Health Services (PARiHS) framework. This study explored the innovative use of AI as a theoretically based KT intervention applied to a clinical issue in an inpatient pediatric care setting. The implementation of AI was explored in terms of its acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility as a KT intervention in pain management.MethodsA mixed-methods case study design was used. The case was a surgical unit in a pediatric academic-affiliated hospital. The sample consisted of nurses in leadership positions and staff nurses interested in the study. Data on the AI intervention implementation were collected by digitally recording the AI sessions, maintaining logs, and conducting individual semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analyses and descriptive statistics. Findings were triangulated in the discussion.ResultsThree nurse leaders and nine staff members participated in the study. Participants were generally satisfied with the intervention, which consisted of four 3-hour, interactive AI sessions delivered over two weeks to promote change based on positive examples of pain management in the unit and staff implementation of an action plan. The AI sessions were delivered with high fidelity and 11 of 12 participants attended all four sessions, where they developed an action plan to enhance evidence-based pain assessment documentation. Participants labeled AI a 'refreshing approach to change' because it was positive, democratic, and built on existing practices. Several barriers affected their implementation of the action plan, including a context of change overload, logistics, busyness, and a lack of organised follow-up.ConclusionsResults of this case study supported the acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility of AI as a KT intervention in pain management. The AI intervention requires minor refinements (e.g., incorporating continued follow-up meetings) to enhance its clinical utility and sustainability. The implementation process and effectiveness of the modified AI intervention require evaluation in a larger multisite study. More... »

PAGES

90

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-5-90

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045538708

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21092118


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1110", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Nursing", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1117", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Public Health and Health Services", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.42327.30", 
          "name": [
            "Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada", 
            "The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kavanagh", 
        "givenName": "Tricia", 
        "id": "sg:person.0614560767.39", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0614560767.39"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada, Toronto, Ontario", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.17063.33", 
          "name": [
            "Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada", 
            "The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada", 
            "Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada, Toronto, Ontario"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Stevens", 
        "givenName": "Bonnie", 
        "id": "sg:person.01227740506.01", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01227740506.01"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "RCN Research Institute, School of Health & Social Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.7372.1", 
          "name": [
            "RCN Research Institute, School of Health & Social Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Seers", 
        "givenName": "Kate", 
        "id": "sg:person.01045156011.03", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01045156011.03"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.68312.3e", 
          "name": [
            "School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Sidani", 
        "givenName": "Souraya", 
        "id": "sg:person.01147510306.39", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01147510306.39"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.17063.33", 
          "name": [
            "Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Watt-Watson", 
        "givenName": "Judy", 
        "id": "sg:person.0753254233.68", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0753254233.68"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-2-15", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011136327", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-2-15"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-1-4", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021360224", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-1-4"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-3-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038971108", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-3-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2010-11-20", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2010-11-20", 
    "description": "BackgroundAppreciative inquiry (AI) is an innovative knowledge translation (KT) intervention that is compatible with the Promoting Action on Research in Health Services (PARiHS) framework. This study explored the innovative use of AI as a theoretically based KT intervention applied to a clinical issue in an inpatient pediatric care setting. The implementation of AI was explored in terms of its acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility as a KT intervention in pain management.MethodsA mixed-methods case study design was used. The case was a surgical unit in a pediatric academic-affiliated hospital. The sample consisted of nurses in leadership positions and staff nurses interested in the study. Data on the AI intervention implementation were collected by digitally recording the AI sessions, maintaining logs, and conducting individual semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analyses and descriptive statistics. Findings were triangulated in the discussion.ResultsThree nurse leaders and nine staff members participated in the study. Participants were generally satisfied with the intervention, which consisted of four 3-hour, interactive AI sessions delivered over two weeks to promote change based on positive examples of pain management in the unit and staff implementation of an action plan. The AI sessions were delivered with high fidelity and 11 of 12 participants attended all four sessions, where they developed an action plan to enhance evidence-based pain assessment documentation. Participants labeled AI a 'refreshing approach to change' because it was positive, democratic, and built on existing practices. Several barriers affected their implementation of the action plan, including a context of change overload, logistics, busyness, and a lack of organised follow-up.ConclusionsResults of this case study supported the acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility of AI as a KT intervention in pain management. The AI intervention requires minor refinements (e.g., incorporating continued follow-up meetings) to enhance its clinical utility and sustainability. The implementation process and effectiveness of the modified AI intervention require evaluation in a larger multisite study.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1036000", 
        "issn": [
          "1748-5908"
        ], 
        "name": "Implementation Science", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "1", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "5"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "pain management", 
      "KT interventions", 
      "academic-affiliated hospital", 
      "pain assessment documentation", 
      "Health Services framework", 
      "pediatric care settings", 
      "knowledge translation intervention", 
      "pediatric nursing practice", 
      "surgical unit", 
      "mixed-method case study design", 
      "large multisite study", 
      "Promoting Action", 
      "care settings", 
      "clinical utility", 
      "clinical issues", 
      "staff nurses", 
      "nursing practice", 
      "study design", 
      "intervention implementation", 
      "assessment documentation", 
      "multisite study", 
      "process evaluation", 
      "intervention", 
      "staff implementation", 
      "nurses", 
      "nurse leaders", 
      "descriptive statistics", 
      "action plan", 
      "staff members", 
      "sessions", 
      "AI interventions", 
      "participants", 
      "acceptability", 
      "hospital", 
      "management", 
      "study", 
      "weeks", 
      "evaluation", 
      "management evidence", 
      "ConclusionsResults", 
      "overload", 
      "case study design", 
      "minor refinements", 
      "service framework", 
      "content analysis", 
      "findings", 
      "setting", 
      "practice", 
      "evidence", 
      "plan", 
      "data", 
      "cases", 
      "feasibility", 
      "action", 
      "units", 
      "implementation process", 
      "interviews", 
      "lack", 
      "utility", 
      "changes", 
      "documentation", 
      "barriers", 
      "AI", 
      "use", 
      "samples", 
      "members", 
      "appreciative inquiry", 
      "effectiveness", 
      "analysis", 
      "innovative use", 
      "statistics", 
      "busyness", 
      "implementation", 
      "research", 
      "quantitative content analysis", 
      "implementation of AI", 
      "refreshing approach", 
      "discussion", 
      "fidelity", 
      "leadership positions", 
      "inquiry", 
      "approach", 
      "logs", 
      "issues", 
      "terms", 
      "position", 
      "design", 
      "context", 
      "high fidelity", 
      "refinement", 
      "process", 
      "logistics", 
      "leaders", 
      "case study", 
      "example", 
      "positive examples", 
      "framework", 
      "sustainability", 
      "feasibility of AI"
    ], 
    "name": "Process evaluation of appreciative inquiry to translate pain management evidence into pediatric nursing practice", 
    "pagination": "90", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1045538708"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1186/1748-5908-5-90"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "21092118"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-5-90", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045538708"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-05-10T10:04", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220509/entities/gbq_results/article/article_518.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-5-90"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

217 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      129 URIs      117 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-5-90 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1110
3 anzsrc-for:1117
4 schema:author N4221250416b340b0a8feb09cfbac117f
5 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-1-4
6 sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-2-15
7 sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-3-1
8 schema:datePublished 2010-11-20
9 schema:datePublishedReg 2010-11-20
10 schema:description BackgroundAppreciative inquiry (AI) is an innovative knowledge translation (KT) intervention that is compatible with the Promoting Action on Research in Health Services (PARiHS) framework. This study explored the innovative use of AI as a theoretically based KT intervention applied to a clinical issue in an inpatient pediatric care setting. The implementation of AI was explored in terms of its acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility as a KT intervention in pain management.MethodsA mixed-methods case study design was used. The case was a surgical unit in a pediatric academic-affiliated hospital. The sample consisted of nurses in leadership positions and staff nurses interested in the study. Data on the AI intervention implementation were collected by digitally recording the AI sessions, maintaining logs, and conducting individual semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analyses and descriptive statistics. Findings were triangulated in the discussion.ResultsThree nurse leaders and nine staff members participated in the study. Participants were generally satisfied with the intervention, which consisted of four 3-hour, interactive AI sessions delivered over two weeks to promote change based on positive examples of pain management in the unit and staff implementation of an action plan. The AI sessions were delivered with high fidelity and 11 of 12 participants attended all four sessions, where they developed an action plan to enhance evidence-based pain assessment documentation. Participants labeled AI a 'refreshing approach to change' because it was positive, democratic, and built on existing practices. Several barriers affected their implementation of the action plan, including a context of change overload, logistics, busyness, and a lack of organised follow-up.ConclusionsResults of this case study supported the acceptability, fidelity, and feasibility of AI as a KT intervention in pain management. The AI intervention requires minor refinements (e.g., incorporating continued follow-up meetings) to enhance its clinical utility and sustainability. The implementation process and effectiveness of the modified AI intervention require evaluation in a larger multisite study.
11 schema:genre article
12 schema:inLanguage en
13 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
14 schema:isPartOf Nd6615fa4744b4ce6bdd3a4a700654b91
15 Nf210ea0d534a44efb29dba3492379aa3
16 sg:journal.1036000
17 schema:keywords AI
18 AI interventions
19 ConclusionsResults
20 Health Services framework
21 KT interventions
22 Promoting Action
23 academic-affiliated hospital
24 acceptability
25 action
26 action plan
27 analysis
28 appreciative inquiry
29 approach
30 assessment documentation
31 barriers
32 busyness
33 care settings
34 case study
35 case study design
36 cases
37 changes
38 clinical issues
39 clinical utility
40 content analysis
41 context
42 data
43 descriptive statistics
44 design
45 discussion
46 documentation
47 effectiveness
48 evaluation
49 evidence
50 example
51 feasibility
52 feasibility of AI
53 fidelity
54 findings
55 framework
56 high fidelity
57 hospital
58 implementation
59 implementation of AI
60 implementation process
61 innovative use
62 inquiry
63 intervention
64 intervention implementation
65 interviews
66 issues
67 knowledge translation intervention
68 lack
69 large multisite study
70 leaders
71 leadership positions
72 logistics
73 logs
74 management
75 management evidence
76 members
77 minor refinements
78 mixed-method case study design
79 multisite study
80 nurse leaders
81 nurses
82 nursing practice
83 overload
84 pain assessment documentation
85 pain management
86 participants
87 pediatric care settings
88 pediatric nursing practice
89 plan
90 position
91 positive examples
92 practice
93 process
94 process evaluation
95 quantitative content analysis
96 refinement
97 refreshing approach
98 research
99 samples
100 service framework
101 sessions
102 setting
103 staff implementation
104 staff members
105 staff nurses
106 statistics
107 study
108 study design
109 surgical unit
110 sustainability
111 terms
112 units
113 use
114 utility
115 weeks
116 schema:name Process evaluation of appreciative inquiry to translate pain management evidence into pediatric nursing practice
117 schema:pagination 90
118 schema:productId N545684ef7e5a497693fee61d0c0ea453
119 N6e8b31f6c6d04a4788f688df4002501d
120 N71b80fa45b1b43b98c7b6e074329f29b
121 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045538708
122 https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-5-90
123 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-05-10T10:04
124 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
125 schema:sdPublisher N3a65683ef5034185bef9c91501778887
126 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-5-90
127 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
128 sgo:sdDataset articles
129 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
130 N03edf089406e4c97b819fa943a8a2169 rdf:first sg:person.01045156011.03
131 rdf:rest N8e732c20d03141deacaf2706be5f7ec9
132 N3a65683ef5034185bef9c91501778887 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
133 rdf:type schema:Organization
134 N4221250416b340b0a8feb09cfbac117f rdf:first sg:person.0614560767.39
135 rdf:rest N6bf3da662cbb4b0ba15f61fb904fa570
136 N545684ef7e5a497693fee61d0c0ea453 schema:name doi
137 schema:value 10.1186/1748-5908-5-90
138 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
139 N697a24f7b0c84f249e8b48e53f39a68f rdf:first sg:person.0753254233.68
140 rdf:rest rdf:nil
141 N6bf3da662cbb4b0ba15f61fb904fa570 rdf:first sg:person.01227740506.01
142 rdf:rest N03edf089406e4c97b819fa943a8a2169
143 N6e8b31f6c6d04a4788f688df4002501d schema:name pubmed_id
144 schema:value 21092118
145 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
146 N71b80fa45b1b43b98c7b6e074329f29b schema:name dimensions_id
147 schema:value pub.1045538708
148 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
149 N8e732c20d03141deacaf2706be5f7ec9 rdf:first sg:person.01147510306.39
150 rdf:rest N697a24f7b0c84f249e8b48e53f39a68f
151 Nd6615fa4744b4ce6bdd3a4a700654b91 schema:volumeNumber 5
152 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
153 Nf210ea0d534a44efb29dba3492379aa3 schema:issueNumber 1
154 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
155 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
156 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
157 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
158 anzsrc-for:1110 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
159 schema:name Nursing
160 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
161 anzsrc-for:1117 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
162 schema:name Public Health and Health Services
163 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
164 sg:journal.1036000 schema:issn 1748-5908
165 schema:name Implementation Science
166 schema:publisher Springer Nature
167 rdf:type schema:Periodical
168 sg:person.01045156011.03 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.7372.1
169 schema:familyName Seers
170 schema:givenName Kate
171 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01045156011.03
172 rdf:type schema:Person
173 sg:person.01147510306.39 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.68312.3e
174 schema:familyName Sidani
175 schema:givenName Souraya
176 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01147510306.39
177 rdf:type schema:Person
178 sg:person.01227740506.01 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.17063.33
179 schema:familyName Stevens
180 schema:givenName Bonnie
181 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01227740506.01
182 rdf:type schema:Person
183 sg:person.0614560767.39 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.42327.30
184 schema:familyName Kavanagh
185 schema:givenName Tricia
186 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0614560767.39
187 rdf:type schema:Person
188 sg:person.0753254233.68 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.17063.33
189 schema:familyName Watt-Watson
190 schema:givenName Judy
191 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0753254233.68
192 rdf:type schema:Person
193 sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-1-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021360224
194 https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-1-4
195 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
196 sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-2-15 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011136327
197 https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-2-15
198 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
199 sg:pub.10.1186/1748-5908-3-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038971108
200 https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-3-1
201 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
202 grid-institutes:grid.17063.33 schema:alternateName Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada, Toronto, Ontario
203 Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
204 schema:name Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada, Toronto, Ontario
205 Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
206 The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
207 rdf:type schema:Organization
208 grid-institutes:grid.42327.30 schema:alternateName The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
209 schema:name Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
210 The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
211 rdf:type schema:Organization
212 grid-institutes:grid.68312.3e schema:alternateName School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
213 schema:name School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
214 rdf:type schema:Organization
215 grid-institutes:grid.7372.1 schema:alternateName RCN Research Institute, School of Health & Social Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
216 schema:name RCN Research Institute, School of Health & Social Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK
217 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...