High-throughput solution processing of large-scale graphene View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2008-11-09

AUTHORS

Vincent C. Tung, Matthew J. Allen, Yang Yang, Richard B. Kaner

ABSTRACT

The electronic properties of graphene, such as high charge carrier concentrations and mobilities, make it a promising candidate for next-generation nanoelectronic devices1,2,3. In particular, electrons and holes can undergo ballistic transport on the sub-micrometre scale in graphene and do not suffer from the scale limitations of current MOSFET technologies2,3. However, it is still difficult to produce single-layer samples of graphene1,3 and bulk processing has not yet been achieved, despite strenuous efforts to develop a scalable production method4,5. Here, we report a versatile solution-based process for the large-scale production of single-layer chemically converted graphene over the entire area of a silicon/SiO2 wafer. By dispersing graphite oxide paper in pure hydrazine we were able to remove oxygen functionalities and restore the planar geometry of the single sheets. The chemically converted graphene sheets that were produced have the largest area reported to date (up to 20 × 40 µm), making them far easier to process. Field-effect devices have been fabricated by conventional photolithography, displaying currents that are three orders of magnitude higher than previously reported for chemically produced graphene6. The size of these sheets enables a wide range of characterization techniques, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, to be performed on the same specimen. More... »

PAGES

25-29

References to SciGraph publications

Journal

TITLE

Nature Nanotechnology

ISSUE

1

VOLUME

4

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  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/nnano.2008.329

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2008.329

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016244742

    PUBMED

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19119278


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