Self-assembly of DNA into nanoscale three-dimensional shapes View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2009-05

AUTHORS

Shawn M. Douglas, Hendrik Dietz, Tim Liedl, Björn Högberg, Franziska Graf, William M. Shih

ABSTRACT

Nanomaterials get complicatedAn important goal in nanotechnology is the programmable self-assembly of complex, three-dimensional nanostructures. With DNA as the building block, synthesis techniques have developed to the stage where two-dimensional designer structures and certain three-dimensional structures can be produced. Douglas et al. describe a refinement of the scaffolded DNA origami technique capable of producing three-dimensional objects of more or less any desired form, to a scale of ten to a hundred nanometres, and with an impressive degree of control over the positions of the various DNA helices. The synthesis involves DNA helices arranged on pleated strands and assembled into honeycomb-like three-dimensional structures. The various strands link together via phosphate groups. The method produces complex objects that are slow to assemble. But it also provides a route towards assembling custom devices with nanometre-scale features, as demonstrated by the construction of objects with shapes resembling a square nut, slotted cross and wire-frame icosahedron. More... »

PAGES

414-418

Journal

TITLE

Nature

ISSUE

7245

VOLUME

459

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  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/nature08016

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature08016

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000109646

    PUBMED

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19458720


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