Radar During The War View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

1945-10

ABSTRACT

DURING recent months, much has been published in the daily Press on various aspects of the many different applications of the new technique known as radiolocation or radar; and in Nature of September 15, Sir Robert Watson-Watt gave a comprehensive account of the manner in which radar had grown from a classical scientific experiment into a wide series of ramifications developed under the intensive pressure of war. H.M. Stationery Office has now published a pamphlet entitled "Radar—a Report on Science at War" (price 1s. net), which is a reprint of an official report issued by the United States Information Service. After briefly surveying the early history of radar both in Great Britain and in the United States, the pamphlet gives an interesting account in general, non-technical language of the important and very interesting part which radar in its various applications played at different stages of the world war. Although the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and later the U.S. Army were conducting experiments in the reflexion of radio waves from ships and aircraft from the year 1930 onwards, British radar is credited with having been developed at a faster pace from 1935 under the immediate threat to Britain's security. Before the United States entered the War, however, the efforts of American and British laboratories were combined as the result of an agreement between the two Governments in 1940 and the visit of a British Technical Mission to Washington in September of that year. From that time onwards, the combined efforts of the two nations in research and development, training of personnel, and the operational use of this new weapon at sea, on land and in the air make a fascinating story. The concluding section, on "Radar in the Peacetime World", refers to the effect which the spectacular advances in radio technique made during the war years will have on the future of television and in improving the safety of travel by sea and air. The number of men who have been trained in radio and radar techniques and maintenance is enormous, and many of these will turn their attention to the extended application of electronics in all directions in a manner which is likely to have a profound and farreaching effect on our daily life. More... »

PAGES

444

Journal

TITLE

Nature

ISSUE

3963

VOLUME

156

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/156444c0

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/156444c0

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050107359


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