Future of Biology in World Affairs* View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

1944-11

AUTHORS

FRANS VERDOORN

ABSTRACT

DURING the last months of the War of 1914–18, a period which—from many points of view–may be compared with the present, the plant scientists and zoologists of the world were less involved in the war effort than they are to-day. Nevertheless, as such addresses and papers as Lyman's "Contributions of American Botanists for More Active Prosecution of War Work" (1918) and Stevens's "American Botanists and the War" (1918) show, some of the foremost plant scientists of the United States were prevailing upon their colleagues to engage in activities which might help the war effort. At the same time much consideration was given to the War from a biological point of view, as such publications as Nicolai's "Biology of War"(1919) and Pearl's "Biology and War"(1918) testify. Just before the end of the War many interesting papers on the role of botany and biology in the post-war world were published. These included "Botany as a National Asset" (Coulter, 1917) and "Botany after the War" (Davis, 1918), and were followed by an unusual number of inspired discussions by men like Lyman, Peirce and Gager. Though during those years a number of biologists did accomplish useful things in such fields as pioneering in dehydration, raising the agricultural output and discovering substitutes of vegetable origin, the foremost trend of thought, especially in the Allied countries, was concerned with biology in the post-war world, in human relations as well as in agriculture, etc. The Germans of that time were, comparatively, much more concerned with problems directly relating to the war effort than were their colleagues in the Allied countries. Diels wrote an entire volume on botanical substitutes; Haber and other chemists revolutionized the fertilizer situation. More... »

PAGES

595

Journal

TITLE

Nature

ISSUE

3915

VOLUME

154

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/154595a0

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/154595a0

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000131319


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2103", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Historical Studies", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/21", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "History and Archaeology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "familyName": "VERDOORN", 
        "givenName": "FRANS", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1944-11", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1944-11-01", 
    "description": "DURING the last months of the War of 1914\u201318, a period which\u2014from many points of view\u2013may be compared with the present, the plant scientists and zoologists of the world were less involved in the war effort than they are to-day. Nevertheless, as such addresses and papers as Lyman's \"Contributions of American Botanists for More Active Prosecution of War Work\" (1918) and Stevens's \"American Botanists and the War\" (1918) show, some of the foremost plant scientists of the United States were prevailing upon their colleagues to engage in activities which might help the war effort. At the same time much consideration was given to the War from a biological point of view, as such publications as Nicolai's \"Biology of War\"(1919) and Pearl's \"Biology and War\"(1918) testify. Just before the end of the War many interesting papers on the role of botany and biology in the post-war world were published. These included \"Botany as a National Asset\" (Coulter, 1917) and \"Botany after the War\" (Davis, 1918), and were followed by an unusual number of inspired discussions by men like Lyman, Peirce and Gager. Though during those years a number of biologists did accomplish useful things in such fields as pioneering in dehydration, raising the agricultural output and discovering substitutes of vegetable origin, the foremost trend of thought, especially in the Allied countries, was concerned with biology in the post-war world, in human relations as well as in agriculture, etc. The Germans of that time were, comparatively, much more concerned with problems directly relating to the war effort than were their colleagues in the Allied countries. Diels wrote an entire volume on botanical substitutes; Haber and other chemists revolutionized the fertilizer situation.", 
    "genre": "non_research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/154595a0", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1018957", 
        "issn": [
          "0090-0028", 
          "1476-4687"
        ], 
        "name": "Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "3915", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "154"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Future of Biology in World Affairs*", 
    "pagination": "595", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "009fd964fec35131434515305ed3ebd92d885c33c304b3318c779b0a26854695"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1038/154595a0"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1000131319"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1038/154595a0", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000131319"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-11T11:53", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000359_0000000359/records_29200_00000000.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://www.nature.com/articles/154595a0"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/154595a0'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/154595a0'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/154595a0'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/154595a0'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

56 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      27 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1038/154595a0 schema:about anzsrc-for:21
2 anzsrc-for:2103
3 schema:author N16f37bfde32a4150b709492c4ee922ae
4 schema:datePublished 1944-11
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1944-11-01
6 schema:description DURING the last months of the War of 1914–18, a period which—from many points of view–may be compared with the present, the plant scientists and zoologists of the world were less involved in the war effort than they are to-day. Nevertheless, as such addresses and papers as Lyman's "Contributions of American Botanists for More Active Prosecution of War Work" (1918) and Stevens's "American Botanists and the War" (1918) show, some of the foremost plant scientists of the United States were prevailing upon their colleagues to engage in activities which might help the war effort. At the same time much consideration was given to the War from a biological point of view, as such publications as Nicolai's "Biology of War"(1919) and Pearl's "Biology and War"(1918) testify. Just before the end of the War many interesting papers on the role of botany and biology in the post-war world were published. These included "Botany as a National Asset" (Coulter, 1917) and "Botany after the War" (Davis, 1918), and were followed by an unusual number of inspired discussions by men like Lyman, Peirce and Gager. Though during those years a number of biologists did accomplish useful things in such fields as pioneering in dehydration, raising the agricultural output and discovering substitutes of vegetable origin, the foremost trend of thought, especially in the Allied countries, was concerned with biology in the post-war world, in human relations as well as in agriculture, etc. The Germans of that time were, comparatively, much more concerned with problems directly relating to the war effort than were their colleagues in the Allied countries. Diels wrote an entire volume on botanical substitutes; Haber and other chemists revolutionized the fertilizer situation.
7 schema:genre non_research_article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
10 schema:isPartOf N290098ff385447438111f4c7ef81c6a0
11 Nd9b0c46b77cb4ff09ef0a991c7ea873a
12 sg:journal.1018957
13 schema:name Future of Biology in World Affairs*
14 schema:pagination 595
15 schema:productId N318da9ab99d448d29c36336035c181d6
16 N87a903e8ee7842639ea0fbd26f753a7d
17 Nd639c685b38a48e6b35732e453cc2cf2
18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000131319
19 https://doi.org/10.1038/154595a0
20 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-11T11:53
21 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
22 schema:sdPublisher Ndd6f4848358f4ca3928e7eed84765582
23 schema:url https://www.nature.com/articles/154595a0
24 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
25 sgo:sdDataset articles
26 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
27 N16f37bfde32a4150b709492c4ee922ae rdf:first N6e4520593e364037b5c1721c9b2da401
28 rdf:rest rdf:nil
29 N290098ff385447438111f4c7ef81c6a0 schema:volumeNumber 154
30 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
31 N318da9ab99d448d29c36336035c181d6 schema:name doi
32 schema:value 10.1038/154595a0
33 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
34 N6e4520593e364037b5c1721c9b2da401 schema:familyName VERDOORN
35 schema:givenName FRANS
36 rdf:type schema:Person
37 N87a903e8ee7842639ea0fbd26f753a7d schema:name dimensions_id
38 schema:value pub.1000131319
39 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
40 Nd639c685b38a48e6b35732e453cc2cf2 schema:name readcube_id
41 schema:value 009fd964fec35131434515305ed3ebd92d885c33c304b3318c779b0a26854695
42 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
43 Nd9b0c46b77cb4ff09ef0a991c7ea873a schema:issueNumber 3915
44 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
45 Ndd6f4848358f4ca3928e7eed84765582 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
46 rdf:type schema:Organization
47 anzsrc-for:21 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
48 schema:name History and Archaeology
49 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
50 anzsrc-for:2103 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
51 schema:name Historical Studies
52 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
53 sg:journal.1018957 schema:issn 0090-0028
54 1476-4687
55 schema:name Nature
56 rdf:type schema:Periodical
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...