Aphasia, or Loss of Speech View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1890-08

AUTHORS

EEST S. REYNOLDS

ABSTRACT

THE subject of aphasia has always been, and still is, not only of the greatest interest, but also of the greatest difficulty. Its interest is, of course, largely due to the fact that a study of partial or total loss of language may not only help in an analysis of language itself, but also may throw light on the exact anatomical situation of that function which has been said to set up an insurmountable barrier between man and the lower animals. Its difficulty is greatly increased by the fact that each investigator seems to define it in a different way. For instance, in the book whose title is given above, which is a second and greatly enlarged edition of Dr. Bateman's “Aphasia,’first published twenty years ago, two entirely different definitions are accepted as correct. In the opening chapter aphasia is defined as “the term which has recently been given to the loss of faculty of language, and of the power of giving expression to thought, the organs of phonation and of articulation, as well as the intelligence, being unimpaired.” On p. 154, however, Dr. Bateman states that he will “employ the term as a title for the whole group of disorders of speech, thus embracing not only the loss, but all the various degrees of impairment, of that faculty.” This latter definition will, of course, denote an enormous number of affections, such as all the losses or alterations of speech due to gross cerebral lesions, to insanity, diseases of the medulla, cretinism, deaf-mutism, chorea, and so forth, many of which have hardly been touched upon in this work. The former definition also, in spite of its greater connotation, would include such diseases as deaf-mutism, which is hardly a form of true aphasia. More... »

PAGES

386-387

Journal

TITLE

Nature

ISSUE

1086

VOLUME

42

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/042386a0

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/042386a0

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039530032


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1103", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Clinical Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "familyName": "REYNOLDS", 
        "givenName": "EEST S.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1890-08", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1890-08-01", 
    "description": "THE subject of aphasia has always been, and still is, not only of the greatest interest, but also of the greatest difficulty. Its interest is, of course, largely due to the fact that a study of partial or total loss of language may not only help in an analysis of language itself, but also may throw light on the exact anatomical situation of that function which has been said to set up an insurmountable barrier between man and the lower animals. Its difficulty is greatly increased by the fact that each investigator seems to define it in a different way. For instance, in the book whose title is given above, which is a second and greatly enlarged edition of Dr. Bateman's \u201cAphasia,\u2019first published twenty years ago, two entirely different definitions are accepted as correct. In the opening chapter aphasia is defined as \u201cthe term which has recently been given to the loss of faculty of language, and of the power of giving expression to thought, the organs of phonation and of articulation, as well as the intelligence, being unimpaired.\u201d On p. 154, however, Dr. Bateman states that he will \u201cemploy the term as a title for the whole group of disorders of speech, thus embracing not only the loss, but all the various degrees of impairment, of that faculty.\u201d This latter definition will, of course, denote an enormous number of affections, such as all the losses or alterations of speech due to gross cerebral lesions, to insanity, diseases of the medulla, cretinism, deaf-mutism, chorea, and so forth, many of which have hardly been touched upon in this work. The former definition also, in spite of its greater connotation, would include such diseases as deaf-mutism, which is hardly a form of true aphasia.", 
    "genre": "non_research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/042386a0", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1018957", 
        "issn": [
          "0090-0028", 
          "1476-4687"
        ], 
        "name": "Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "1086", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "42"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Aphasia, or Loss of Speech", 
    "pagination": "386-387", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "bc4d90543223838d8ce9bc8b0ea0b68bf0c21be97a34dd337083f50988b3fa5f"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1038/042386a0"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1039530032"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1038/042386a0", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039530032"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-11T12:13", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000361_0000000361/records_53999_00000001.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://www.nature.com/articles/042386a0"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/042386a0'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/042386a0'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/042386a0'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1038/042386a0'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

56 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      27 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1038/042386a0 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1103
3 schema:author Nf4fd2f56fb20402eb6b044d46572794a
4 schema:datePublished 1890-08
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1890-08-01
6 schema:description THE subject of aphasia has always been, and still is, not only of the greatest interest, but also of the greatest difficulty. Its interest is, of course, largely due to the fact that a study of partial or total loss of language may not only help in an analysis of language itself, but also may throw light on the exact anatomical situation of that function which has been said to set up an insurmountable barrier between man and the lower animals. Its difficulty is greatly increased by the fact that each investigator seems to define it in a different way. For instance, in the book whose title is given above, which is a second and greatly enlarged edition of Dr. Bateman's “Aphasia,’first published twenty years ago, two entirely different definitions are accepted as correct. In the opening chapter aphasia is defined as “the term which has recently been given to the loss of faculty of language, and of the power of giving expression to thought, the organs of phonation and of articulation, as well as the intelligence, being unimpaired.” On p. 154, however, Dr. Bateman states that he will “employ the term as a title for the whole group of disorders of speech, thus embracing not only the loss, but all the various degrees of impairment, of that faculty.” This latter definition will, of course, denote an enormous number of affections, such as all the losses or alterations of speech due to gross cerebral lesions, to insanity, diseases of the medulla, cretinism, deaf-mutism, chorea, and so forth, many of which have hardly been touched upon in this work. The former definition also, in spite of its greater connotation, would include such diseases as deaf-mutism, which is hardly a form of true aphasia.
7 schema:genre non_research_article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf N6e1762eb9a0b4f4db339580519ad2014
11 N87e87f413e1b42d5bfd7ea06abcd2d46
12 sg:journal.1018957
13 schema:name Aphasia, or Loss of Speech
14 schema:pagination 386-387
15 schema:productId N3b50d3eb2b6d41a5b700bb34cd2f5b24
16 N5ccf43644f434ddf82a97139c5cdcc60
17 Nd75769a19fa9471482d388eb06c38409
18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039530032
19 https://doi.org/10.1038/042386a0
20 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-11T12:13
21 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
22 schema:sdPublisher N777208e6976446309197d17571778b5a
23 schema:url http://www.nature.com/articles/042386a0
24 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
25 sgo:sdDataset articles
26 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
27 N3b50d3eb2b6d41a5b700bb34cd2f5b24 schema:name doi
28 schema:value 10.1038/042386a0
29 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
30 N5ccf43644f434ddf82a97139c5cdcc60 schema:name readcube_id
31 schema:value bc4d90543223838d8ce9bc8b0ea0b68bf0c21be97a34dd337083f50988b3fa5f
32 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
33 N6e1762eb9a0b4f4db339580519ad2014 schema:issueNumber 1086
34 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
35 N777208e6976446309197d17571778b5a schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
36 rdf:type schema:Organization
37 N87e87f413e1b42d5bfd7ea06abcd2d46 schema:volumeNumber 42
38 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
39 Nd1a4de722433444596009597946873ef schema:familyName REYNOLDS
40 schema:givenName EEST S.
41 rdf:type schema:Person
42 Nd75769a19fa9471482d388eb06c38409 schema:name dimensions_id
43 schema:value pub.1039530032
44 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
45 Nf4fd2f56fb20402eb6b044d46572794a rdf:first Nd1a4de722433444596009597946873ef
46 rdf:rest rdf:nil
47 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
48 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
49 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
50 anzsrc-for:1103 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
51 schema:name Clinical Sciences
52 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
53 sg:journal.1018957 schema:issn 0090-0028
54 1476-4687
55 schema:name Nature
56 rdf:type schema:Periodical
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...