Stressors and Stress Reactions Among University Personnel View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2002-10

AUTHORS

Judy M. Hogan, John G. Carlson, Jagdish Dua

ABSTRACT

A large, ethnically diverse, and representative sample of university workers in administrative, instructional, and blue-collar/clerical support categories were administered a battery of questionnaires designed to assess job and nonwork stress, biopsychosocial reactions to stress, emotionality, medical symptoms and utilization, and perceived social support, among other variables. A total of 831 participants returned questionnaires. The principal results showed that job and nonwork stress correlated positively with behavioral, cognitive, and physiological reactions to stress as well as with negative emotionality. Job and nonwork stress correlated meaningfully with medical symptoms; nonwork stress also correlated at a useful level with reported medical utilization. Social support did not generally modulate reports of stress or reactions to stress. It was also found that support staff reported higher levels of nonwork stress and lower levels of work stress, but that 2 measures of job stress did not differentiate administrative and instructional personnel. Younger staff reported higher levels of job and nonwork stress, and females reported higher levels of nonwork stress, irrespective of job category. The results were discussed in terms of their importance for understanding the nature of stress among personnel on the university campus and in relation to prior research. More... »

PAGES

289-310

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2001-10. Occupational Stress in University Staff in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STRESS MANAGEMENT
  • 1986-03. University faculty and administrator responses to job strains in RESEARCH IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • 1999-01. Worksite Stress Management with High-Risk Maintenance Workers: A Controlled Study in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STRESS MANAGEMENT
  • 1984-12. Sources of stress in academe: A national perspective in RESEARCH IN HIGHER EDUCATION
  • 1990. Stress, Support, and Coping among Women Professionals with Preschool Children in STRESS BETWEEN WORK AND FAMILY
  • 1997-07. The wellness behavior interaction model in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STRESS MANAGEMENT
  • 1994-01. Job stress in university, corporate, and military personnel in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF STRESS MANAGEMENT
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1019982316327

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002869532


    Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
    Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

    JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/17", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Psychology and Cognitive Sciences", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1701", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Psychology", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "author": [
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.410445.0", 
              "name": [
                "University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Hogan", 
            "givenName": "Judy M.", 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, 2430 Campus Road, 96822, Honolulu, HI", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.410445.0", 
              "name": [
                "Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, 2430 Campus Road, 96822, Honolulu, HI"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Carlson", 
            "givenName": "John G.", 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Sydney Stress Management Centre, Australia", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/None", 
              "name": [
                "Sydney Stress Management Centre, Australia"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Dua", 
            "givenName": "Jagdish", 
            "id": "sg:person.01275352276.54", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01275352276.54"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }
        ], 
        "citation": [
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1021958219737", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034210766", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1021958219737"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00991876", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021156569", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00991876"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf01857281", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016668722", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01857281"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1017513615819", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1003277389", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1017513615819"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf02765321", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019923034", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02765321"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00974924", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050868528", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00974924"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2097-3_4", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001389199", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2097-3_4"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }
        ], 
        "datePublished": "2002-10", 
        "datePublishedReg": "2002-10-01", 
        "description": "A large, ethnically diverse, and representative sample of university workers in administrative, instructional, and blue-collar/clerical support categories were administered a battery of questionnaires designed to assess job and nonwork stress, biopsychosocial reactions to stress, emotionality, medical symptoms and utilization, and perceived social support, among other variables. A total of 831 participants returned questionnaires. The principal results showed that job and nonwork stress correlated positively with behavioral, cognitive, and physiological reactions to stress as well as with negative emotionality. Job and nonwork stress correlated meaningfully with medical symptoms; nonwork stress also correlated at a useful level with reported medical utilization. Social support did not generally modulate reports of stress or reactions to stress. It was also found that support staff reported higher levels of nonwork stress and lower levels of work stress, but that 2 measures of job stress did not differentiate administrative and instructional personnel. Younger staff reported higher levels of job and nonwork stress, and females reported higher levels of nonwork stress, irrespective of job category. The results were discussed in terms of their importance for understanding the nature of stress among personnel on the university campus and in relation to prior research.", 
        "genre": "article", 
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327", 
        "inLanguage": "en", 
        "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
        "isPartOf": [
          {
            "id": "sg:journal.1105667", 
            "issn": [
              "1072-5245", 
              "1573-3424"
            ], 
            "name": "International Journal of Stress Management", 
            "publisher": "American Psychological Association (APA)", 
            "type": "Periodical"
          }, 
          {
            "issueNumber": "4", 
            "type": "PublicationIssue"
          }, 
          {
            "type": "PublicationVolume", 
            "volumeNumber": "9"
          }
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "nonwork stress", 
          "social support", 
          "battery of questionnaires", 
          "reports of stress", 
          "medical symptoms", 
          "negative emotionality", 
          "nature of stress", 
          "job stress", 
          "work stress", 
          "stress reactions", 
          "younger staff", 
          "prior research", 
          "high levels", 
          "physiological reactions", 
          "university workers", 
          "emotionality", 
          "instructional personnel", 
          "support categories", 
          "support staff", 
          "representative sample", 
          "jobs", 
          "job categories", 
          "university personnel", 
          "questionnaire", 
          "stressors", 
          "support", 
          "participants", 
          "low levels", 
          "symptoms", 
          "staff", 
          "categories", 
          "personnel", 
          "stress", 
          "measures", 
          "batteries", 
          "university campus", 
          "research", 
          "useful levels", 
          "medical utilization", 
          "variables", 
          "workers", 
          "levels", 
          "relation", 
          "results", 
          "nature", 
          "importance", 
          "samples", 
          "campus", 
          "terms", 
          "females", 
          "principal results", 
          "report", 
          "total", 
          "reaction", 
          "utilization", 
          "clerical support categories", 
          "biopsychosocial reactions"
        ], 
        "name": "Stressors and Stress Reactions Among University Personnel", 
        "pagination": "289-310", 
        "productId": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "pub.1002869532"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "doi", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "10.1023/a:1019982316327"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1019982316327", 
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002869532"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "articles", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2021-12-01T19:14", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20211201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_362.jsonl", 
        "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1019982316327"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    160 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      90 URIs      75 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1019982316327 schema:about anzsrc-for:17
    2 anzsrc-for:1701
    3 schema:author N624710bd5fd44ff8b54091b08e314f5d
    4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2097-3_4
    5 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00974924
    6 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00991876
    7 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01857281
    8 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02765321
    9 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1017513615819
    10 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1021958219737
    11 schema:datePublished 2002-10
    12 schema:datePublishedReg 2002-10-01
    13 schema:description A large, ethnically diverse, and representative sample of university workers in administrative, instructional, and blue-collar/clerical support categories were administered a battery of questionnaires designed to assess job and nonwork stress, biopsychosocial reactions to stress, emotionality, medical symptoms and utilization, and perceived social support, among other variables. A total of 831 participants returned questionnaires. The principal results showed that job and nonwork stress correlated positively with behavioral, cognitive, and physiological reactions to stress as well as with negative emotionality. Job and nonwork stress correlated meaningfully with medical symptoms; nonwork stress also correlated at a useful level with reported medical utilization. Social support did not generally modulate reports of stress or reactions to stress. It was also found that support staff reported higher levels of nonwork stress and lower levels of work stress, but that 2 measures of job stress did not differentiate administrative and instructional personnel. Younger staff reported higher levels of job and nonwork stress, and females reported higher levels of nonwork stress, irrespective of job category. The results were discussed in terms of their importance for understanding the nature of stress among personnel on the university campus and in relation to prior research.
    14 schema:genre article
    15 schema:inLanguage en
    16 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
    17 schema:isPartOf N3556763ca27341b0b1e9b615ddd251a8
    18 Ne0f2745982ad4dff9e1e137bff756543
    19 sg:journal.1105667
    20 schema:keywords batteries
    21 battery of questionnaires
    22 biopsychosocial reactions
    23 campus
    24 categories
    25 clerical support categories
    26 emotionality
    27 females
    28 high levels
    29 importance
    30 instructional personnel
    31 job categories
    32 job stress
    33 jobs
    34 levels
    35 low levels
    36 measures
    37 medical symptoms
    38 medical utilization
    39 nature
    40 nature of stress
    41 negative emotionality
    42 nonwork stress
    43 participants
    44 personnel
    45 physiological reactions
    46 principal results
    47 prior research
    48 questionnaire
    49 reaction
    50 relation
    51 report
    52 reports of stress
    53 representative sample
    54 research
    55 results
    56 samples
    57 social support
    58 staff
    59 stress
    60 stress reactions
    61 stressors
    62 support
    63 support categories
    64 support staff
    65 symptoms
    66 terms
    67 total
    68 university campus
    69 university personnel
    70 university workers
    71 useful levels
    72 utilization
    73 variables
    74 work stress
    75 workers
    76 younger staff
    77 schema:name Stressors and Stress Reactions Among University Personnel
    78 schema:pagination 289-310
    79 schema:productId N593324c7a84242238e45a3504a7a3fdb
    80 N87929f2bc0564d2392ce58db7a0c2ba1
    81 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002869532
    82 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1019982316327
    83 schema:sdDatePublished 2021-12-01T19:14
    84 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    85 schema:sdPublisher N8463fd158624495fb273283373d1acd4
    86 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1019982316327
    87 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    88 sgo:sdDataset articles
    89 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
    90 N3556763ca27341b0b1e9b615ddd251a8 schema:issueNumber 4
    91 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
    92 N4676240ca71b4177ab666fb8402120e1 rdf:first sg:person.01275352276.54
    93 rdf:rest rdf:nil
    94 N4b11a6f20ee24f7bbadda28ea72b2a0f rdf:first N5dcdae56178a4ff991c70c9a8604f67e
    95 rdf:rest N4676240ca71b4177ab666fb8402120e1
    96 N593324c7a84242238e45a3504a7a3fdb schema:name doi
    97 schema:value 10.1023/a:1019982316327
    98 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    99 N5dcdae56178a4ff991c70c9a8604f67e schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.410445.0
    100 schema:familyName Carlson
    101 schema:givenName John G.
    102 rdf:type schema:Person
    103 N624710bd5fd44ff8b54091b08e314f5d rdf:first N91dfd81845934aa0b733b9cbabdaa65e
    104 rdf:rest N4b11a6f20ee24f7bbadda28ea72b2a0f
    105 N8463fd158624495fb273283373d1acd4 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    106 rdf:type schema:Organization
    107 N87929f2bc0564d2392ce58db7a0c2ba1 schema:name dimensions_id
    108 schema:value pub.1002869532
    109 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    110 N91dfd81845934aa0b733b9cbabdaa65e schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.410445.0
    111 schema:familyName Hogan
    112 schema:givenName Judy M.
    113 rdf:type schema:Person
    114 Ne0f2745982ad4dff9e1e137bff756543 schema:volumeNumber 9
    115 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
    116 anzsrc-for:17 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    117 schema:name Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
    118 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    119 anzsrc-for:1701 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    120 schema:name Psychology
    121 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    122 sg:journal.1105667 schema:issn 1072-5245
    123 1573-3424
    124 schema:name International Journal of Stress Management
    125 schema:publisher American Psychological Association (APA)
    126 rdf:type schema:Periodical
    127 sg:person.01275352276.54 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:None
    128 schema:familyName Dua
    129 schema:givenName Jagdish
    130 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01275352276.54
    131 rdf:type schema:Person
    132 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2097-3_4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001389199
    133 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2097-3_4
    134 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    135 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00974924 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050868528
    136 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00974924
    137 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    138 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00991876 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021156569
    139 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00991876
    140 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    141 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01857281 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016668722
    142 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01857281
    143 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    144 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02765321 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019923034
    145 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02765321
    146 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    147 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1017513615819 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1003277389
    148 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1017513615819
    149 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    150 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1021958219737 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034210766
    151 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1021958219737
    152 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    153 grid-institutes:None schema:alternateName Sydney Stress Management Centre, Australia
    154 schema:name Sydney Stress Management Centre, Australia
    155 rdf:type schema:Organization
    156 grid-institutes:grid.410445.0 schema:alternateName Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, 2430 Campus Road, 96822, Honolulu, HI
    157 University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA
    158 schema:name Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, 2430 Campus Road, 96822, Honolulu, HI
    159 University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA
    160 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...