Origins and introductions of the Caribbean frog, Eleutherodactylus johnstonei (Leptodactylidae): management and conservation concerns View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1997-10

AUTHORS

HINRICH KAISER

ABSTRACT

Johnstone's Whistling Frog, Eleutherodactylus johnstonei, is a highly successful colonizer that has become widely distributed throughout the Caribbean region. It has been introduced both purposefully and unintentionally by humans, and it continues to expand its range locally and regionally. Its current distribution and recent expansion do not support the hypothesis that E. johnstonei is expanding into new habitats exclusively by outcompeting native species. Instead, its range expansion progresses mainly parallel to human expansion (habitat disturbance through land development) and extreme climatic events (habitat disturbance through hurricanes and volcanism). Once a habitat has been disturbed and E. johnstonei has arrived, any previously existing endemic Eleutherodactylus species tend not to be found again at their previous ranges or population densities. The most probable explanation for this is that the broader physiological tolerance of the ecological generalist E. johnstonei allows it to become permanently established in a disturbed biota, whereas ecologically specialized endemics are prevented from recolonizing such habitats. Invasion of E. johnstonei can result in a parapatric distribution with endemics (e.g. E. euphronides, E. shrevei) or in sympatry (e.g. E. martinicensis), and habitats include areas with widely divergent climatic conditions (e.g. xeric: Anguilla, Barbuda; mesic: Grenada, St Vincent). Management for this species includes prevention of further or repeat introductions, close monitoring of ranges, and preservation of native habitats to ensure survival of local endemics. More... »

PAGES

1391-1407

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1018341814510

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1018341814510

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026780904


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