The role of N-remobilisation and the uptake of NH4+ and NO3- by Lolium perenne L. in laminae growth following defoliation ... View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2000-05

AUTHORS

S. Louahlia, P. Lainé, B. Thornton, A. Ourry, J. Boucaud

ABSTRACT

Several studies have previously shown that shoot removal of forage species, either by cutting or herbivore grazing, results in a large decline in N uptake (60%) and/or N2 fixation (80%). The source of N used for initial shoot growth following defoliation relies mainly on mobilisation of N reserves from tissues remaining after defoliation. To date, most studies investigating N-mobilisation have been conducted, with isolated plants grown in controlled conditions. The objectives of this study were for Lolium perenne L., grown in a dense canopy in field conditions, to determine: 1) the contribution of N-mobilisation, NH4+ uptake and NO3- uptake to growing shoots after defoliation, and 2) the contribution of the high (HATS) and low (LATS) affinity transport systems to the total plant uptake of NH4+ and NO3-. During the first seven days following defoliation, decreases in biomass and N-content of roots (34% and 47%, respectively) and to a lesser extent stubble (18% and 43%, respectively) were observed, concomitant with mobilisation of N to shoots. The proportion and origin of N used by shoots (derived from reserves or uptake) was similar to data reported for isolated plants. Both HATS and LATS contributed to the total root uptake of NH4+ and NO3-. The Vmax of both the NH4+ and NO3- HATS increased as a function of time after defoliation, and both HATS systems were saturated by substrate concentrations in the soil at all times. The capacity of the LATS was reduced as soil NO3- and NH4+ concentrations decreased following defoliation. Data from 15N uptake by field-grown plants, and uptake rates of NH4+ and NO3- estimated by excised root bioassays, were significantly correlated, though uptake was over-estimated by the later method. The results are discussed in terms of putative mechanisms for regulating N uptake following severe defoliation. More... »

PAGES

175-187

Journal

TITLE

Plant and Soil

ISSUE

1-2

VOLUME

220

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1023/a:1004728327955

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1004728327955

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036434486


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