Changes in alternative religiosities in Latin America: from the New Age to flows of transnationalizations View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2018-12

AUTHORS

Marcelo Camurça

ABSTRACT

The phenomenon of New Age that broke out in Brazil and Latin America in the 1980s/1990s, as the unfolding of counter-cultural and neo-esoteric movements from the USA, was characterized by the circulation and utilization of the contents of world religions, in a process of irreverent eclecticism. Therewith establishing an autonomous religiosity and networks where these individuals went, combining different spiritualities. What, then, are the updates of these movements for the 2000s and 2010s? With the increase of globalization and transnational flows of events, ideas, and materials, broader, more accelerated, and more integrating dynamics seem to be taking place, mixing and articulating local and universal religious cultures. There are many examples: Afro-Brazilian religions that cross the border with Argentina and Uruguay and are reinvented and adapted to these context; traditional Aztec dances that are relocated on the US and Mexican borders by immigrants; the sacred ayahuasca plant of Amazonian shamanism, transmuted into Santo Daime in Brazil, which takes on new contours in Uruguay in the process of neo-Indianization. All this seems to indicate a complex and vertiginously accelerated process of transnationalization and hybridization, in relation to the new age eclecticism of the 1980s/1990s, where deterritorializations and reterritorializations produce a multi-situated religiosity, but also “inventions of traditions” that occur by valuing indigenous, black, rural/traditional communities in the recovery of ancient rituals and customs and in the redefinition of their identities. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the continuities of the so-called New Age, in their bricolages and syncretisms present in contemporary transnationalizations. These are on a much larger scale and range. And also to demonstrate if the flow of religious and symbolic influences came from the US and Europe to Latin America; now, this flow is reversed. There are influences from Latin America towards Europe and the USA and between realities and places in Latin America itself. More... »

PAGES

1-16

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s41603-018-0058-1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s41603-018-0058-1

DIMENSIONS

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