Status of Nano Science and Technology in India View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2012-10

AUTHORS

Shilpanjali Deshpande Sarma, Manish Anand

ABSTRACT

Perceived globally as an enabling technology with multiple applications and revolutionary impact, nanoscience and technology has been keenly embraced by developing countries like India for socio-economic and industrial benefits. Several advances have been made by India in this emerging technology since the turn of the century. The present paper examines the Indian engagement with nanotechnology across the policy, academic, industry and sectoral domains. The study reveals that the nanotechnology endeavour in India has been shaped by the state, primarily led by DST and public funded R&D institutions although it has witnessed expanded participation via the involvement of other actors both in the public and private domains. The other funding agencies such as DBT and DIT, private research institutes, large firms, industry associations, civil society organizations and individual states are emerging as key players in directing India’s nanotechnology trajectory. After establishing this context, the study assesses the role of the main players in sculpting the nanotechnology’s course in India. A formal nanotechnology initiative, the NSTI in 2001 was the culmination of previous fragmented beginnings in nanomaterial sciences. The study reviews and examines the goals and initiatives under the DST led flagship programs alongside those assumed by other players through the lens of the capacities that are being created to expand nanotechnology R&D in India. The support for R&D projects, institutional, infrastructure and human resource developments as well as forging collaborations are the key dimensions of government role in the national nanotechnology domain. Industry role on the other hand has been to give shape to technology development and concrete applications in various sectors in individual capacities or even through collaborations with public institutions as emphasised in the NSTM. In addition, the paper also analyses the research avenues in nanotechnology being undertaken in India and shows that alongside fundamental research in nanomaterial synthesis and characterization, applied research and application development in the health, energy, water, agriculture, environment, electronics and textiles are also being assumed. Identifying nanomedicine as a prominent sphere of research in India it gives a detailed account of the actors, research and technologies being developed in this sphere in both public and private domains. Finally the study highlights the outcome of nanotechnology in the research domain by the way of growth in publications and patent numbers. Despite limited resources as compared to developed nations, India has developed a strong foundation for nanotechnology research. We can easily meet the societal and economic needs by strengthening our innovation capabilities. More... »

PAGES

99-126

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s40011-012-0077-2

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40011-012-0077-2

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030726940


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