“Plant a victory garden: our food is fighting:” Lessons of food resilience from World War View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2015-09

AUTHORS

Alesia Maltz

ABSTRACT

Today, the high ideals of local food production reverberate as a model of self-sufficiency and food security. In the USA and Great Britain during World War I (WWI), local food production was envisioned as ammunition to win the war. To what extent have the food policies and slogans of World Wars I and II influenced current ideas of the value of local strategies of food security in maintaining resilience, and what lessons does the history of war offer about food resilience? During World War I, German and British military strategists developed plans to win the war by leveraging actions to destroy their enemy’s civilian food system. This history triangulates the food resilience of a country that imported food (Great Britain) with one that grew its food locally (Germany), and one that exported surplus (the USA) to examine the strengths and limits of local food production. During World War I, Germany suffered over a million fatalities from famine, while the USA and Great Britain raised their national nutritional status by the end of the war. The tragic German experience led directly to the rise of World War II (WWII), a war initiated with a “Hunger Plan.” Nineteen million civilians died, many of starvation. A long historical time frame is needed to construct lessons about resilient food systems. This brief sketch of the dismantling and reconstruction of food systems in WWI and WWII draws from secondary sources to suggest novel ideas about the interplay between local production, national coordination, and international networks for humanitarian aid. Using the food policies of three countries—Great Britain, the USA, and Germany—this history provides an opportunity to consider the characteristics of resilient food systems, and to suggest what is required to reconstruct a large-scale food system following a crisis. War, a disrupter of food systems, also provides a model of how food systems can be reconstructed. More... »

PAGES

392-403

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013884229


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2103", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Historical Studies", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/21", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "History and Archaeology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Antioch University New England", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.252292.c", 
          "name": [
            "Antioch University New England, Keene, NH, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Maltz", 
        "givenName": "Alesia", 
        "id": "sg:person.01244066610.48", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01244066610.48"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/ereh/hes018", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031041142"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2007.06.002", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037101223"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1177/0968344511433158", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041592978"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1177/0968344511433158", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041592978"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/gh/11.2.161", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1059635825"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1083057519", 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2015-09", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2015-09-01", 
    "description": "Today, the high ideals of local food production reverberate as a model of self-sufficiency and food security. In the USA and Great Britain during World War I (WWI), local food production was envisioned as ammunition to win the war. To what extent have the food policies and slogans of World Wars I and II influenced current ideas of the value of local strategies of food security in maintaining resilience, and what lessons does the history of war offer about food resilience? During World War I, German and British military strategists developed plans to win the war by leveraging actions to destroy their enemy\u2019s civilian food system. This history triangulates the food resilience of a country that imported food (Great Britain) with one that grew its food locally (Germany), and one that exported surplus (the USA) to examine the strengths and limits of local food production. During World War I, Germany suffered over a million fatalities from famine, while the USA and Great Britain raised their national nutritional status by the end of the war. The tragic German experience led directly to the rise of World War II (WWII), a war initiated with a \u201cHunger Plan.\u201d Nineteen million civilians died, many of starvation. A long historical time frame is needed to construct lessons about resilient food systems. This brief sketch of the dismantling and reconstruction of food systems in WWI and WWII draws from secondary sources to suggest novel ideas about the interplay between local production, national coordination, and international networks for humanitarian aid. Using the food policies of three countries\u2014Great Britain, the USA, and Germany\u2014this history provides an opportunity to consider the characteristics of resilient food systems, and to suggest what is required to reconstruct a large-scale food system following a crisis. War, a disrupter of food systems, also provides a model of how food systems can be reconstructed.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1051423", 
        "issn": [
          "2190-6483", 
          "2190-6491"
        ], 
        "name": "Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "3", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "5"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "\u201cPlant a victory garden: our food is fighting:\u201d Lessons of food resilience from World War", 
    "pagination": "392-403", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "422413a88c371546074c2a96b85e8dc47e60579d09d22cd7d3b352d5330a5b04"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1013884229"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013884229"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-10T15:03", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8663_00000521.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs13412-015-0293-1"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

75 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      32 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1 schema:about anzsrc-for:21
2 anzsrc-for:2103
3 schema:author N82cbb9f558d44f09bc56728ef901c519
4 schema:citation https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1083057519
5 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2007.06.002
6 https://doi.org/10.1093/ereh/hes018
7 https://doi.org/10.1093/gh/11.2.161
8 https://doi.org/10.1177/0968344511433158
9 schema:datePublished 2015-09
10 schema:datePublishedReg 2015-09-01
11 schema:description Today, the high ideals of local food production reverberate as a model of self-sufficiency and food security. In the USA and Great Britain during World War I (WWI), local food production was envisioned as ammunition to win the war. To what extent have the food policies and slogans of World Wars I and II influenced current ideas of the value of local strategies of food security in maintaining resilience, and what lessons does the history of war offer about food resilience? During World War I, German and British military strategists developed plans to win the war by leveraging actions to destroy their enemy’s civilian food system. This history triangulates the food resilience of a country that imported food (Great Britain) with one that grew its food locally (Germany), and one that exported surplus (the USA) to examine the strengths and limits of local food production. During World War I, Germany suffered over a million fatalities from famine, while the USA and Great Britain raised their national nutritional status by the end of the war. The tragic German experience led directly to the rise of World War II (WWII), a war initiated with a “Hunger Plan.” Nineteen million civilians died, many of starvation. A long historical time frame is needed to construct lessons about resilient food systems. This brief sketch of the dismantling and reconstruction of food systems in WWI and WWII draws from secondary sources to suggest novel ideas about the interplay between local production, national coordination, and international networks for humanitarian aid. Using the food policies of three countries—Great Britain, the USA, and Germany—this history provides an opportunity to consider the characteristics of resilient food systems, and to suggest what is required to reconstruct a large-scale food system following a crisis. War, a disrupter of food systems, also provides a model of how food systems can be reconstructed.
12 schema:genre research_article
13 schema:inLanguage en
14 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
15 schema:isPartOf N9b31e96d836a4abea9181f7bd7023fa7
16 Nbcb058612ce84a19ba0faa2adbe7ae4c
17 sg:journal.1051423
18 schema:name “Plant a victory garden: our food is fighting:” Lessons of food resilience from World War
19 schema:pagination 392-403
20 schema:productId N24e55dd1b4cd46328d5b40c9f9426335
21 N6c4b55aac9f64c8d81c95548726f7aa5
22 N7258915c72744baeaae3a071868863ba
23 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013884229
24 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1
25 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-10T15:03
26 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
27 schema:sdPublisher Ne0a2175fac644bacba3769d3ffbb9252
28 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs13412-015-0293-1
29 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
30 sgo:sdDataset articles
31 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
32 N24e55dd1b4cd46328d5b40c9f9426335 schema:name dimensions_id
33 schema:value pub.1013884229
34 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
35 N6c4b55aac9f64c8d81c95548726f7aa5 schema:name doi
36 schema:value 10.1007/s13412-015-0293-1
37 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
38 N7258915c72744baeaae3a071868863ba schema:name readcube_id
39 schema:value 422413a88c371546074c2a96b85e8dc47e60579d09d22cd7d3b352d5330a5b04
40 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
41 N82cbb9f558d44f09bc56728ef901c519 rdf:first sg:person.01244066610.48
42 rdf:rest rdf:nil
43 N9b31e96d836a4abea9181f7bd7023fa7 schema:volumeNumber 5
44 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
45 Nbcb058612ce84a19ba0faa2adbe7ae4c schema:issueNumber 3
46 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
47 Ne0a2175fac644bacba3769d3ffbb9252 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
48 rdf:type schema:Organization
49 anzsrc-for:21 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
50 schema:name History and Archaeology
51 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
52 anzsrc-for:2103 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
53 schema:name Historical Studies
54 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
55 sg:journal.1051423 schema:issn 2190-6483
56 2190-6491
57 schema:name Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences
58 rdf:type schema:Periodical
59 sg:person.01244066610.48 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.252292.c
60 schema:familyName Maltz
61 schema:givenName Alesia
62 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01244066610.48
63 rdf:type schema:Person
64 https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1083057519 schema:CreativeWork
65 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2007.06.002 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037101223
66 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
67 https://doi.org/10.1093/ereh/hes018 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031041142
68 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
69 https://doi.org/10.1093/gh/11.2.161 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1059635825
70 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
71 https://doi.org/10.1177/0968344511433158 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041592978
72 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
73 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.252292.c schema:alternateName Antioch University New England
74 schema:name Antioch University New England, Keene, NH, USA
75 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...