Kutane Leishmaniasis View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2021-10-04

AUTHORS

N. Urban, J. Walochnik, A. Handisurya

ABSTRACT

Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne, parasitic disease caused by infection with protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania. These parasites are transmitted between mammalian hosts by infected female phlebotomine sand flies. About 20 different species of Leishmania have been identified to date, which can be geographically divided into Old World (Africa, Asia, Mediterranean countries) and New World (Central and South America) species. Depending on the causative species and the immune system of the infected host, infection can lead to diverse clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis, ranging in severity from self-curing cutaneous lesions to life-threatening visceral disease. The most common form, cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is characterized by papules, nodules, ulceration and subsequent scarring of the skin, affects up to 1.2 million people worldwide. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is predominantly endemic in regions of the Middle East, Central Asia, Africa, Central and South America. In recent years, however, increasing incidences have been observed in Europe, which could be caused by increasing travel or migration activities from endemic regions as well as by the spread of the vectors due to climate change, globalization and urbanization. Diagnosis is based upon detection of the Leishmania parasites or their DNA in tissue specimens. The accurate identification of the causative Leishmania species is of utmost importance due to species-specific treatment recommendations. Therapeutic options for cutaneous leishmaniasis encompass a variety of topical and systemic agents. More... »

PAGES

213-219

References to SciGraph publications

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s12326-021-00468-0

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12326-021-00468-0

DIMENSIONS

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