First Responders’ Perceptions of the Presence of Support Canines in the Workplace View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2021-09-17

AUTHORS

Taylor Curley, Mary Ann Campbell, Jessie N. Doyle, Samuel M. Freeze

ABSTRACT

First responders (e.g. police, firefighters, paramedics) experience significant and varied stressors in their personal and professional lives (Carleton et al. 2018a, Carleton et al. 2018b) and may be more vulnerable to psychological problems as a result (Komarovskaya et al. 2011). The use of support canines aids in mitigating psychological distress (Krause-Parello and Morales 2018); however, scant research exists on the effect of this support resource among first responders. The current study aimed to (1) assess first responders’ general endorsement of having support canines in their workplace and identify first responder characteristics that predict endorsement and (2) determine whether first responders from sites with (vs. without) support canines demonstrate better psychological wellness and psychological help-seeking. Participants included 140 first responders (64.3% males, 45.0% police officers) who completed measures of mental health (DASS-21; Lovibond and Lovibond 1995), psychological help-seeking (IASMHS; Mackenzie et al. 2004), and canine attitudes and experience with support canines (author developed). Results identified low levels of mental health symptoms overall, which did not significantly differ between participants from organizations with and without canine support. Participants were more receptive to having support canines when they had more positive attitudes towards canines in general. Although access to canine support animals did not appear to influence the overall psychological wellness of first responders on quantitative measures, qualitative data suggests that these animals may provide temporary stress relief benefits that require further empirical investigation. More... »

PAGES

1-9

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URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11896-021-09477-4

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11896-021-09477-4

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1141193533


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