Suicide and Associated Vulnerability Indicators in Adult Missing Persons: Implications for the Police Risk Assessment View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2019-01-15

AUTHORS

Hannah Yong, Calli Tzani-Pepelasis

ABSTRACT

This research examined the relationship between adult missing persons and suicide, considering a number of possible vulnerability indicators/characteristics of this group of missing persons. Implications for missing person investigations were also explored, particularly for the risk assessment process. Data was extracted for 93 (N = 93) missing persons cases from one English police force, over a 4-year period. These individuals were found dead suspected of suicide. The findings illustrate a number of vulnerability indicators/characteristics of missing persons who complete suicide. In relation to the initial risk assessment level applied to the missing person report, two vulnerability indicators, a risk of suicide and the presence of a suicide note, had an effect on predicting a higher risk assessment level. Future research, in order to overcome the present study’s limitations, should attempt to collect data from more than one police force in order to increase the sample size. In addition to this, it would be beneficial to use a sample of missing persons who are found safe and well as a comparative sample to have a better chance in understanding the examined relationship and whether the vulnerability indicators/characteristics are indicative of suicide risk. The findings of this study have practical implications for the risk assessment process and are a step forward in providing empirical evidence applicable to identifying missing persons most at risk of suicide. This research has helped to build upon and corroborate existing knowledge of missing persons who complete suicide. This study provides new empirical evidence on suicide in adult missing persons. The findings demonstrate the subjective and variable nature of the risk assessment process and highlight potential implications on missing person investigations. More... »

PAGES

459-471

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2016-12-20. A Profile of Missing Persons: Some Key Findings for Police Officers in HANDBOOK OF MISSING PERSONS
  • 2002-06. Life events preceding suicide by young people in SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • 2010-10-07. Exploring the Impact of Child Sex Offender Suicide in JOURNAL OF FAMILY VIOLENCE
  • 1999-12. Life events in suicide and undetermined death in south-east Scotland: a case-control study using the method of psychological autopsy in SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1111439981


    Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
    Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

    JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/16", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Studies in Human Society", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/17", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Psychology and Cognitive Sciences", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1602", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Criminology", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1701", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Psychology", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "author": [
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "School of Human and Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH, Huddersfield, UK", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.15751.37", 
              "name": [
                "School of Human and Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH, Huddersfield, UK"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Yong", 
            "givenName": "Hannah", 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "School of Human and Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH, Huddersfield, UK", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.15751.37", 
              "name": [
                "School of Human and Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH, Huddersfield, UK"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Tzani-Pepelasis", 
            "givenName": "Calli", 
            "type": "Person"
          }
        ], 
        "citation": [
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10896-010-9335-3", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020033588", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10896-010-9335-3"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-319-40199-7_2", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016276874", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40199-7_2"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s001270050187", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038709415", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s001270050187"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s001270200019", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017225554", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s001270200019"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }
        ], 
        "datePublished": "2019-01-15", 
        "datePublishedReg": "2019-01-15", 
        "description": "This research examined the relationship between adult missing persons and suicide, considering a number of possible vulnerability indicators/characteristics of this group of missing persons. Implications for missing person investigations were also explored, particularly for the risk assessment process. Data was extracted for 93 (N\u2009=\u200993) missing persons cases from one English police force, over a 4-year period. These individuals were found dead suspected of suicide. The findings illustrate a number of vulnerability indicators/characteristics of missing persons who complete suicide. In relation to the initial risk assessment level applied to the missing person report, two vulnerability indicators, a risk of suicide and the presence of a suicide note, had an effect on predicting a higher risk assessment level. Future research, in order to overcome the present study\u2019s limitations, should attempt to collect data from more than one police force in order to increase the sample size. In addition to this, it would be beneficial to use a sample of missing persons who are found safe and well as a comparative sample to have a better chance in understanding the examined relationship and whether the vulnerability indicators/characteristics are indicative of suicide risk. The findings of this study have practical implications for the risk assessment process and are a step forward in providing empirical evidence applicable to identifying missing persons most at risk of suicide. This research has helped to build upon and corroborate existing knowledge of missing persons who complete suicide. This study provides new empirical evidence on suicide in adult missing persons. The findings demonstrate the subjective and variable nature of the risk assessment process and highlight potential implications on missing person investigations.", 
        "genre": "article", 
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7", 
        "inLanguage": "en", 
        "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
        "isPartOf": [
          {
            "id": "sg:journal.1053097", 
            "issn": [
              "0882-0783", 
              "1936-6469"
            ], 
            "name": "Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology", 
            "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
            "type": "Periodical"
          }, 
          {
            "issueNumber": "4", 
            "type": "PublicationIssue"
          }, 
          {
            "type": "PublicationVolume", 
            "volumeNumber": "35"
          }
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "risk of suicide", 
          "risk assessment process", 
          "suicide risk", 
          "suicide", 
          "risk assessment level", 
          "risk", 
          "study limitations", 
          "Police Risk Assessment", 
          "adults", 
          "best chance", 
          "persons", 
          "suicide notes", 
          "present study's limitations", 
          "findings", 
          "sample size", 
          "assessment process", 
          "potential implications", 
          "risk assessment", 
          "assessment level", 
          "Persons Report", 
          "evidence", 
          "levels", 
          "study", 
          "report", 
          "future research", 
          "group", 
          "indicators", 
          "individuals", 
          "assessment", 
          "period", 
          "data", 
          "relationship", 
          "implications", 
          "samples", 
          "cases", 
          "number", 
          "chance", 
          "investigation", 
          "effect", 
          "characteristics", 
          "presence", 
          "limitations", 
          "research", 
          "vulnerability indicators", 
          "variable nature", 
          "addition", 
          "knowledge", 
          "comparative sample", 
          "relation", 
          "note", 
          "size", 
          "process", 
          "order", 
          "empirical evidence", 
          "nature", 
          "force", 
          "English police force", 
          "step", 
          "person cases", 
          "Missing Persons", 
          "police force", 
          "Practical implications", 
          "persons investigations", 
          "new empirical evidence", 
          "possible vulnerability indicators/characteristics", 
          "vulnerability indicators/characteristics", 
          "indicators/characteristics", 
          "initial risk assessment level", 
          "higher risk assessment level", 
          "Associated Vulnerability Indicators", 
          "Adult Missing Persons"
        ], 
        "name": "Suicide and Associated Vulnerability Indicators in Adult Missing Persons: Implications for the Police Risk Assessment", 
        "pagination": "459-471", 
        "productId": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "pub.1111439981"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "doi", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7", 
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1111439981"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "articles", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2021-11-01T18:34", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20211101/entities/gbq_results/article/article_814.jsonl", 
        "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    158 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      102 URIs      88 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:pub.10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7 schema:about anzsrc-for:16
    2 anzsrc-for:1602
    3 anzsrc-for:17
    4 anzsrc-for:1701
    5 schema:author Ne78db691324541e6896575bd54cbdb1d
    6 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-319-40199-7_2
    7 sg:pub.10.1007/s001270050187
    8 sg:pub.10.1007/s001270200019
    9 sg:pub.10.1007/s10896-010-9335-3
    10 schema:datePublished 2019-01-15
    11 schema:datePublishedReg 2019-01-15
    12 schema:description This research examined the relationship between adult missing persons and suicide, considering a number of possible vulnerability indicators/characteristics of this group of missing persons. Implications for missing person investigations were also explored, particularly for the risk assessment process. Data was extracted for 93 (N = 93) missing persons cases from one English police force, over a 4-year period. These individuals were found dead suspected of suicide. The findings illustrate a number of vulnerability indicators/characteristics of missing persons who complete suicide. In relation to the initial risk assessment level applied to the missing person report, two vulnerability indicators, a risk of suicide and the presence of a suicide note, had an effect on predicting a higher risk assessment level. Future research, in order to overcome the present study’s limitations, should attempt to collect data from more than one police force in order to increase the sample size. In addition to this, it would be beneficial to use a sample of missing persons who are found safe and well as a comparative sample to have a better chance in understanding the examined relationship and whether the vulnerability indicators/characteristics are indicative of suicide risk. The findings of this study have practical implications for the risk assessment process and are a step forward in providing empirical evidence applicable to identifying missing persons most at risk of suicide. This research has helped to build upon and corroborate existing knowledge of missing persons who complete suicide. This study provides new empirical evidence on suicide in adult missing persons. The findings demonstrate the subjective and variable nature of the risk assessment process and highlight potential implications on missing person investigations.
    13 schema:genre article
    14 schema:inLanguage en
    15 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
    16 schema:isPartOf Nbe4a32e904fe44269f13d633437dee41
    17 Nfc9305e9f6b547ccbfe842b0124c93ea
    18 sg:journal.1053097
    19 schema:keywords Adult Missing Persons
    20 Associated Vulnerability Indicators
    21 English police force
    22 Missing Persons
    23 Persons Report
    24 Police Risk Assessment
    25 Practical implications
    26 addition
    27 adults
    28 assessment
    29 assessment level
    30 assessment process
    31 best chance
    32 cases
    33 chance
    34 characteristics
    35 comparative sample
    36 data
    37 effect
    38 empirical evidence
    39 evidence
    40 findings
    41 force
    42 future research
    43 group
    44 higher risk assessment level
    45 implications
    46 indicators
    47 indicators/characteristics
    48 individuals
    49 initial risk assessment level
    50 investigation
    51 knowledge
    52 levels
    53 limitations
    54 nature
    55 new empirical evidence
    56 note
    57 number
    58 order
    59 period
    60 person cases
    61 persons
    62 persons investigations
    63 police force
    64 possible vulnerability indicators/characteristics
    65 potential implications
    66 presence
    67 present study's limitations
    68 process
    69 relation
    70 relationship
    71 report
    72 research
    73 risk
    74 risk assessment
    75 risk assessment level
    76 risk assessment process
    77 risk of suicide
    78 sample size
    79 samples
    80 size
    81 step
    82 study
    83 study limitations
    84 suicide
    85 suicide notes
    86 suicide risk
    87 variable nature
    88 vulnerability indicators
    89 vulnerability indicators/characteristics
    90 schema:name Suicide and Associated Vulnerability Indicators in Adult Missing Persons: Implications for the Police Risk Assessment
    91 schema:pagination 459-471
    92 schema:productId N1c5bea1c6bc2483a8cb2dded5d5842a2
    93 N5e19c7e053874f31a84bef687958800b
    94 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1111439981
    95 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7
    96 schema:sdDatePublished 2021-11-01T18:34
    97 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    98 schema:sdPublisher Na7e1d424c3a447f48d8b8350f6e5aa9d
    99 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7
    100 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    101 sgo:sdDataset articles
    102 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
    103 N1c5bea1c6bc2483a8cb2dded5d5842a2 schema:name doi
    104 schema:value 10.1007/s11896-018-9308-7
    105 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    106 N3b586cbed3e2471eb421138629558305 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.15751.37
    107 schema:familyName Yong
    108 schema:givenName Hannah
    109 rdf:type schema:Person
    110 N5e19c7e053874f31a84bef687958800b schema:name dimensions_id
    111 schema:value pub.1111439981
    112 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    113 N661b379b6b8c4e2691926671b2208cc1 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.15751.37
    114 schema:familyName Tzani-Pepelasis
    115 schema:givenName Calli
    116 rdf:type schema:Person
    117 N7ba56aad0d8f4ceaa04400eb07aecb50 rdf:first N661b379b6b8c4e2691926671b2208cc1
    118 rdf:rest rdf:nil
    119 Na7e1d424c3a447f48d8b8350f6e5aa9d schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    120 rdf:type schema:Organization
    121 Nbe4a32e904fe44269f13d633437dee41 schema:issueNumber 4
    122 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
    123 Ne78db691324541e6896575bd54cbdb1d rdf:first N3b586cbed3e2471eb421138629558305
    124 rdf:rest N7ba56aad0d8f4ceaa04400eb07aecb50
    125 Nfc9305e9f6b547ccbfe842b0124c93ea schema:volumeNumber 35
    126 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
    127 anzsrc-for:16 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    128 schema:name Studies in Human Society
    129 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    130 anzsrc-for:1602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    131 schema:name Criminology
    132 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    133 anzsrc-for:17 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    134 schema:name Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
    135 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    136 anzsrc-for:1701 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    137 schema:name Psychology
    138 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    139 sg:journal.1053097 schema:issn 0882-0783
    140 1936-6469
    141 schema:name Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology
    142 schema:publisher Springer Nature
    143 rdf:type schema:Periodical
    144 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-319-40199-7_2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016276874
    145 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40199-7_2
    146 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    147 sg:pub.10.1007/s001270050187 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038709415
    148 https://doi.org/10.1007/s001270050187
    149 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    150 sg:pub.10.1007/s001270200019 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017225554
    151 https://doi.org/10.1007/s001270200019
    152 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    153 sg:pub.10.1007/s10896-010-9335-3 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020033588
    154 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10896-010-9335-3
    155 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    156 grid-institutes:grid.15751.37 schema:alternateName School of Human and Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH, Huddersfield, UK
    157 schema:name School of Human and Health Sciences, Department of Psychology, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, HD1 3DH, Huddersfield, UK
    158 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...