Biogeochemistry of methanogenesis with a specific emphasis on the mineral-facilitating effects View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2017-05-13

AUTHORS

Yahai Lu, Wei Zhang

ABSTRACT

The Earth surface contains various oxic and anoxic environments. The later include natural wetlands, river and lake sediments, paddy field soils and landfills. In the last few decades, the biogeochemical cycle of carbon in anoxic environments, which leads to the production and emission of methane, a potent greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, has drawn great attentions from both scientific and public sectors. New organisms and mechanisms involved in methanogenesis and carbon cycling have been uncovered. Interspecies electron transfer is considered as a crucial step in methanogenesis in anoxic environments. Electron-carrying mediators, like H2 and formate, are known to play the key role in electron transfer. Recently, it has been found that in addition to the conventional electron transfer via chemical mediators, direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) can occur. In this Review, we describe the ecology and biogeochemistry of methanogenesis and highlight the effect of microbe-mineral interaction on microbial syntrophy. Recent advances in the study of DIET may pave the way towards a mechanistic understanding of methanogenesis and the influence of microbe-mineral interaction on this process. More... »

PAGES

379-384

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11631-017-0168-0

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11631-017-0168-0

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1085405437


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