Towards bioremediation of toxic unresolved complex mixtures of hydrocarbons: identification of bacteria capable of rapid degradation of alkyltetralins View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2009-03-08

AUTHORS

Max Frenzel, Philip James, Sara K. Burton, Steven J. Rowland, Hilary M. Lappin-Scott

ABSTRACT

Background, aim and scopeUnresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread, but often overlooked, environmental contaminants. Since UCMs are generally rather resistant to bacterial degradation, bioremediation of UCM-contaminated sites by bacteria is a challenging goal. Branched chain alkyltetralins are amongst the individual classes of components of aromatic UCMs which have been identified in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments and a number of synthetic alkyltetralins have proved toxic in laboratory studies. Thus, alkyltetralins should perhaps be amongst the targets for UCM bioremediation strategies. The slow degradation of several alkyltetralins by a microbial consortium has been reported previously; however, the bacteria involved remain unidentified and no single strain capable of alkyltetralin biodegradation has been isolated. The present project therefore aimed to enrich and identify bacterial consortia and single strains of bacteria from a naturally hydrocarbon-contaminated site (Whitley Bay, UK), which were capable of the degradation of two synthetic alkyltetralins (6-cyclohexyltetralin (CHT) and 1-(3’-methylbutyl)-7-cyclohexyltetralin (MBCHT)).Materials and methodsBacteria were enriched from sediment collected from Whitley Bay, UK by culturing with CHT and MBCHT for a period of 4 months. Biodegradation experiments were then established and degradation of model compounds monitored by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Internal standards allowed the generation of quantitative data. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from individual enrichments to allow assessment of microbial community structure. Selective media containing MBCHT were used to isolate single bacterial strains. These strains were then tested in liquid culture for their ability to degrade MBCHT.ResultsThe consortia obtained through enrichment culture were able to degrade 87% of CHT and 76% of MBCHT after only 46 days compared with abiotic controls. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries of these bacteria were dominated by sequences of Rhodococcus spp. Using selective media, a strain of Rhodococcus was then isolated that was also able to biodegrade 63% of MBCHT in only 21 days.DiscussionThe present report describes the isolation of a single bacterial strain able to degrade the resistant MBCHT. Although significant losses of MBCHT were observed, putative metabolites were not detectable. Rhodococcus sp. have been reported previously to be able to biodegrade a range of hydrocarbon compounds.Recommendations and perspectivesDue to their environmental persistence and toxicity, aromatic UCMs require bioremediation. The culturing and identification of such bacteria capable of rapid degradation of alkyltetralins may be an important step toward the development of bioremediation strategies for sites contaminated with toxic UCMs. More... »

PAGES

129

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019958894


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/05", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Environmental Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/07", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.8391.3", 
          "name": [
            "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Frenzel", 
        "givenName": "Max", 
        "id": "sg:person.0712720163.19", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0712720163.19"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.8391.3", 
          "name": [
            "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "James", 
        "givenName": "Philip", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.8391.3", 
          "name": [
            "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Burton", 
        "givenName": "Sara K.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0615077335.37", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0615077335.37"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, School of Earth Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, PL4 8AA, Drake Circus, Plymouth, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.11201.33", 
          "name": [
            "Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, School of Earth Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, PL4 8AA, Drake Circus, Plymouth, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Rowland", 
        "givenName": "Steven J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.010212615172.70", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010212615172.70"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.8391.3", 
          "name": [
            "School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Lappin-Scott", 
        "givenName": "Hilary M.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01234702403.15", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01234702403.15"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/344648a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026611172", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/344648a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00122421", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007523791", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00122421"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1012227302373", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046416442", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1012227302373"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1065/jss2007.06.232", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040635893", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1065/jss2007.06.232"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00508122", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1004281499", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00508122"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1012223014534", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011997944", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1012223014534"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2148-6-29", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011735536", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-6-29"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2009-03-08", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2009-03-08", 
    "description": "Background, aim and scopeUnresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread, but often overlooked, environmental contaminants. Since UCMs are generally rather resistant to bacterial degradation, bioremediation of UCM-contaminated sites by bacteria is a challenging goal. Branched chain alkyltetralins are amongst the individual classes of components of aromatic UCMs which have been identified in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments and a number of synthetic alkyltetralins have proved toxic in laboratory studies. Thus, alkyltetralins should perhaps be amongst the targets for UCM bioremediation strategies. The slow degradation of several alkyltetralins by a microbial consortium has been reported previously; however, the bacteria involved remain unidentified and no single strain capable of alkyltetralin biodegradation has been isolated. The present project therefore aimed to enrich and identify bacterial consortia and single strains of bacteria from a naturally hydrocarbon-contaminated site (Whitley Bay, UK), which were capable of the degradation of two synthetic alkyltetralins (6-cyclohexyltetralin (CHT) and 1-(3\u2019-methylbutyl)-7-cyclohexyltetralin (MBCHT)).Materials and methodsBacteria were enriched from sediment collected from Whitley Bay, UK by culturing with CHT and MBCHT for a period of 4\u00a0months. Biodegradation experiments were then established and degradation of model compounds monitored by gas chromatography\u2013mass spectrometry. Internal standards allowed the generation of quantitative data. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from individual enrichments to allow assessment of microbial community structure. Selective media containing MBCHT were used to isolate single bacterial strains. These strains were then tested in liquid culture for their ability to degrade MBCHT.ResultsThe consortia obtained through enrichment culture were able to degrade 87% of CHT and 76% of MBCHT after only 46\u00a0days compared with abiotic controls. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries of these bacteria were dominated by sequences of Rhodococcus spp. Using selective media, a strain of Rhodococcus was then isolated that was also able to biodegrade 63% of MBCHT in only 21\u00a0days.DiscussionThe present report describes the isolation of a single bacterial strain able to degrade the resistant MBCHT. Although significant losses of MBCHT were observed, putative metabolites were not detectable. Rhodococcus sp. have been reported previously to be able to biodegrade a range of hydrocarbon compounds.Recommendations and perspectivesDue to their environmental persistence and toxicity, aromatic UCMs require bioremediation. The culturing and identification of such bacteria capable of rapid degradation of alkyltetralins may be an important step toward the development of bioremediation strategies for sites contaminated with toxic UCMs.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1034521", 
        "issn": [
          "1439-0108", 
          "1614-7480"
        ], 
        "name": "Journal of Soils and Sediments", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "2", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "9"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "complex mixtures", 
      "gas chromatography-mass spectrometry", 
      "chromatography-mass spectrometry", 
      "unresolved complex mixture", 
      "model compounds", 
      "hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments", 
      "hydrocarbon compounds", 
      "internal standard", 
      "alkyltetralins", 
      "rapid degradation", 
      "bioremediation strategies", 
      "aromatic hydrocarbons", 
      "environmental persistence", 
      "slow degradation", 
      "strains of Rhodococcus", 
      "compounds", 
      "hydrocarbons", 
      "environmental contaminants", 
      "individual enrichments", 
      "putative metabolites", 
      "biodegradation experiments", 
      "bacterial degradation", 
      "significant loss", 
      "mixture", 
      "degradation", 
      "Whitley Bay", 
      "abiotic controls", 
      "bioremediation", 
      "challenging goal", 
      "spectrometry", 
      "bacterial strains", 
      "contaminants", 
      "single bacterial strain", 
      "bacterial consortium", 
      "hydrocarbon-contaminated sites", 
      "materials", 
      "CHT", 
      "sediments", 
      "biodegradation", 
      "structure", 
      "UCM", 
      "medium", 
      "microbial consortium", 
      "sites", 
      "enrichment", 
      "metabolites", 
      "range", 
      "step", 
      "important step", 
      "individual classes", 
      "toxicity", 
      "enrichment cultures", 
      "bacteria", 
      "identification of bacteria", 
      "laboratory studies", 
      "isolation", 
      "identification", 
      "experiments", 
      "library", 
      "generation", 
      "Rhodococcus spp", 
      "Rhodococcus", 
      "strategies", 
      "present project", 
      "components", 
      "ability", 
      "class", 
      "present report", 
      "such bacteria", 
      "liquid culture", 
      "standards", 
      "quantitative data", 
      "study", 
      "development", 
      "target", 
      "loss", 
      "Bay", 
      "consortium", 
      "number", 
      "strains", 
      "data", 
      "sequence", 
      "microbial community structure", 
      "culturing", 
      "aim", 
      "control", 
      "report", 
      "goal", 
      "assessment", 
      "days", 
      "persistence", 
      "selective media", 
      "community structure", 
      "spp", 
      "single strain", 
      "clone libraries", 
      "background", 
      "period", 
      "gene clone libraries", 
      "culture", 
      "ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries", 
      "rRNA gene clone libraries", 
      "project", 
      "UK", 
      "months", 
      "UCMS", 
      "recommendations", 
      "UCM-contaminated sites", 
      "Branched chain alkyltetralins", 
      "chain alkyltetralins", 
      "aromatic UCMs", 
      "synthetic alkyltetralins", 
      "UCM bioremediation strategies", 
      "alkyltetralin biodegradation", 
      "methodsBacteria", 
      "MBCHT", 
      "RNA gene clone libraries", 
      "resistant MBCHT", 
      "perspectivesDue", 
      "aromatic UCMs", 
      "toxic UCMs", 
      "toxic unresolved complex mixtures"
    ], 
    "name": "Towards bioremediation of toxic unresolved complex mixtures of hydrocarbons: identification of bacteria capable of rapid degradation of alkyltetralins", 
    "pagination": "129", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1019958894"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019958894"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2021-12-01T19:21", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20211201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_486.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

241 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      154 URIs      138 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:05
3 anzsrc-for:07
4 schema:author N62d1092be91f45788fc1e2c43f0e86f7
5 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf00122421
6 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00508122
7 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1012223014534
8 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1012227302373
9 sg:pub.10.1038/344648a0
10 sg:pub.10.1065/jss2007.06.232
11 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2148-6-29
12 schema:datePublished 2009-03-08
13 schema:datePublishedReg 2009-03-08
14 schema:description Background, aim and scopeUnresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread, but often overlooked, environmental contaminants. Since UCMs are generally rather resistant to bacterial degradation, bioremediation of UCM-contaminated sites by bacteria is a challenging goal. Branched chain alkyltetralins are amongst the individual classes of components of aromatic UCMs which have been identified in hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments and a number of synthetic alkyltetralins have proved toxic in laboratory studies. Thus, alkyltetralins should perhaps be amongst the targets for UCM bioremediation strategies. The slow degradation of several alkyltetralins by a microbial consortium has been reported previously; however, the bacteria involved remain unidentified and no single strain capable of alkyltetralin biodegradation has been isolated. The present project therefore aimed to enrich and identify bacterial consortia and single strains of bacteria from a naturally hydrocarbon-contaminated site (Whitley Bay, UK), which were capable of the degradation of two synthetic alkyltetralins (6-cyclohexyltetralin (CHT) and 1-(3’-methylbutyl)-7-cyclohexyltetralin (MBCHT)).Materials and methodsBacteria were enriched from sediment collected from Whitley Bay, UK by culturing with CHT and MBCHT for a period of 4 months. Biodegradation experiments were then established and degradation of model compounds monitored by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Internal standards allowed the generation of quantitative data. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from individual enrichments to allow assessment of microbial community structure. Selective media containing MBCHT were used to isolate single bacterial strains. These strains were then tested in liquid culture for their ability to degrade MBCHT.ResultsThe consortia obtained through enrichment culture were able to degrade 87% of CHT and 76% of MBCHT after only 46 days compared with abiotic controls. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries of these bacteria were dominated by sequences of Rhodococcus spp. Using selective media, a strain of Rhodococcus was then isolated that was also able to biodegrade 63% of MBCHT in only 21 days.DiscussionThe present report describes the isolation of a single bacterial strain able to degrade the resistant MBCHT. Although significant losses of MBCHT were observed, putative metabolites were not detectable. Rhodococcus sp. have been reported previously to be able to biodegrade a range of hydrocarbon compounds.Recommendations and perspectivesDue to their environmental persistence and toxicity, aromatic UCMs require bioremediation. The culturing and identification of such bacteria capable of rapid degradation of alkyltetralins may be an important step toward the development of bioremediation strategies for sites contaminated with toxic UCMs.
15 schema:genre article
16 schema:inLanguage en
17 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
18 schema:isPartOf Nc447d4828cd84f729918a16a9f1a298f
19 Nf65936d598254d6b903f7b1ebea6fd1f
20 sg:journal.1034521
21 schema:keywords Bay
22 Branched chain alkyltetralins
23 CHT
24 MBCHT
25 RNA gene clone libraries
26 Rhodococcus
27 Rhodococcus spp
28 UCM
29 UCM bioremediation strategies
30 UCM-contaminated sites
31 UCMS
32 UK
33 Whitley Bay
34 ability
35 abiotic controls
36 aim
37 alkyltetralin biodegradation
38 alkyltetralins
39 aromatic UCMs
40 aromatic hydrocarbons
41 assessment
42 background
43 bacteria
44 bacterial consortium
45 bacterial degradation
46 bacterial strains
47 biodegradation
48 biodegradation experiments
49 bioremediation
50 bioremediation strategies
51 chain alkyltetralins
52 challenging goal
53 chromatography-mass spectrometry
54 class
55 clone libraries
56 community structure
57 complex mixtures
58 components
59 compounds
60 consortium
61 contaminants
62 control
63 culture
64 culturing
65 data
66 days
67 degradation
68 development
69 enrichment
70 enrichment cultures
71 environmental contaminants
72 environmental persistence
73 experiments
74 gas chromatography-mass spectrometry
75 gene clone libraries
76 generation
77 goal
78 hydrocarbon compounds
79 hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments
80 hydrocarbon-contaminated sites
81 hydrocarbons
82 identification
83 identification of bacteria
84 important step
85 individual classes
86 individual enrichments
87 internal standard
88 isolation
89 laboratory studies
90 library
91 liquid culture
92 loss
93 materials
94 medium
95 metabolites
96 methodsBacteria
97 microbial community structure
98 microbial consortium
99 mixture
100 model compounds
101 months
102 number
103 period
104 persistence
105 perspectivesDue
106 present project
107 present report
108 project
109 putative metabolites
110 quantitative data
111 rRNA gene clone libraries
112 range
113 rapid degradation
114 recommendations
115 report
116 resistant MBCHT
117 ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries
118 sediments
119 selective media
120 sequence
121 significant loss
122 single bacterial strain
123 single strain
124 sites
125 slow degradation
126 spectrometry
127 spp
128 standards
129 step
130 strains
131 strains of Rhodococcus
132 strategies
133 structure
134 study
135 such bacteria
136 synthetic alkyltetralins
137 target
138 toxic UCMs
139 toxic unresolved complex mixtures
140 toxicity
141 unresolved complex mixture
142 schema:name Towards bioremediation of toxic unresolved complex mixtures of hydrocarbons: identification of bacteria capable of rapid degradation of alkyltetralins
143 schema:pagination 129
144 schema:productId N4139079a05514dc7b581964fe3e9b11b
145 N9238bc6e1c2541aa972c99f2c2aff159
146 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019958894
147 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4
148 schema:sdDatePublished 2021-12-01T19:21
149 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
150 schema:sdPublisher Nd0e88d946c70450eaffd28a490709b1e
151 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4
152 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
153 sgo:sdDataset articles
154 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
155 N059368a139fd432c880ba3e38b77766f rdf:first sg:person.0615077335.37
156 rdf:rest Nc625a3b8c2cc4a07be30da017c99c5d7
157 N0e6c60e95c9f420aaf5ea42b6f2dcc84 rdf:first sg:person.01234702403.15
158 rdf:rest rdf:nil
159 N17b4fdac3f084fb291cd7d94ef2b6417 rdf:first Nd61b7a9ee3f3418f9a17a28a17bd8895
160 rdf:rest N059368a139fd432c880ba3e38b77766f
161 N4139079a05514dc7b581964fe3e9b11b schema:name doi
162 schema:value 10.1007/s11368-009-0070-4
163 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
164 N62d1092be91f45788fc1e2c43f0e86f7 rdf:first sg:person.0712720163.19
165 rdf:rest N17b4fdac3f084fb291cd7d94ef2b6417
166 N9238bc6e1c2541aa972c99f2c2aff159 schema:name dimensions_id
167 schema:value pub.1019958894
168 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
169 Nc447d4828cd84f729918a16a9f1a298f schema:issueNumber 2
170 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
171 Nc625a3b8c2cc4a07be30da017c99c5d7 rdf:first sg:person.010212615172.70
172 rdf:rest N0e6c60e95c9f420aaf5ea42b6f2dcc84
173 Nd0e88d946c70450eaffd28a490709b1e schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
174 rdf:type schema:Organization
175 Nd61b7a9ee3f3418f9a17a28a17bd8895 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.8391.3
176 schema:familyName James
177 schema:givenName Philip
178 rdf:type schema:Person
179 Nf65936d598254d6b903f7b1ebea6fd1f schema:volumeNumber 9
180 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
181 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
182 schema:name Earth Sciences
183 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
184 anzsrc-for:05 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
185 schema:name Environmental Sciences
186 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
187 anzsrc-for:07 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
188 schema:name Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
189 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
190 sg:journal.1034521 schema:issn 1439-0108
191 1614-7480
192 schema:name Journal of Soils and Sediments
193 schema:publisher Springer Nature
194 rdf:type schema:Periodical
195 sg:person.010212615172.70 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.11201.33
196 schema:familyName Rowland
197 schema:givenName Steven J.
198 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010212615172.70
199 rdf:type schema:Person
200 sg:person.01234702403.15 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.8391.3
201 schema:familyName Lappin-Scott
202 schema:givenName Hilary M.
203 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01234702403.15
204 rdf:type schema:Person
205 sg:person.0615077335.37 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.8391.3
206 schema:familyName Burton
207 schema:givenName Sara K.
208 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0615077335.37
209 rdf:type schema:Person
210 sg:person.0712720163.19 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.8391.3
211 schema:familyName Frenzel
212 schema:givenName Max
213 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0712720163.19
214 rdf:type schema:Person
215 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00122421 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007523791
216 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00122421
217 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
218 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00508122 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1004281499
219 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00508122
220 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
221 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1012223014534 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011997944
222 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1012223014534
223 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
224 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1012227302373 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046416442
225 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1012227302373
226 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
227 sg:pub.10.1038/344648a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026611172
228 https://doi.org/10.1038/344648a0
229 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
230 sg:pub.10.1065/jss2007.06.232 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040635893
231 https://doi.org/10.1065/jss2007.06.232
232 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
233 sg:pub.10.1186/1471-2148-6-29 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011735536
234 https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-6-29
235 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
236 grid-institutes:grid.11201.33 schema:alternateName Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, School of Earth Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, PL4 8AA, Drake Circus, Plymouth, UK
237 schema:name Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, School of Earth Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, PL4 8AA, Drake Circus, Plymouth, UK
238 rdf:type schema:Organization
239 grid-institutes:grid.8391.3 schema:alternateName School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK
240 schema:name School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QD, Exeter, UK
241 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...