Escape in the city: urbanization alters the escape behavior of Anolis lizards View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2019-03-30

AUTHORS

Kevin J. Avilés-Rodríguez, Jason J. Kolbe

ABSTRACT

Behavioral adjustments may allow organisms to cope with the drastic environmental change caused by urbanization. We compared the escape behavior of Anolis lizards during simulated predator approaches on trees in both urban and forest habitats and on artificial structures (i.e., cement walls and metal posts) in urban areas. We found that urban lizards were less wary on trees, likely due at least in part to habituation to humans. In contrast, lizards on cement walls showed greater wariness, which may reflect a behavioral modification when escaping because of poor locomotor performance on this substrate. In both habitats, lizards modulated escape responses in ways consistent with their performance abilities on the various substrates. Escape by jumping decreased when lizards used wider and more isolated perches, which are characteristic of urban sites. Urban lizards squirreled (i.e., moved to the opposite side of a structure) more on wider trees and metal posts, and sprinted more but never jumped from cement walls. These behavioral responses for predator escape are consistent with the structural habitat changes caused by urbanization. Urban habitats had larger diameter trees, sparser ground vegetation, and many artificial structures. We found that urban lizards showed behavioral modulations because of exposure to humans as well as the locomotor constraints of using some artificial structures, such as cement walls. The ability of urban lizards to alter their escape responses and adjust to novel features of the habitat may be important traits of species able to colonize and persist in urban areas. More... »

PAGES

733-742

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1113144186


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Boston, 02125, Boston, MA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.266685.9", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 02881, Kingston, RI, USA", 
            "Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Boston, 02125, Boston, MA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Avil\u00e9s-Rodr\u00edguez", 
        "givenName": "Kevin J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.010141601371.21", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010141601371.21"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 02881, Kingston, RI, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.20431.34", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 02881, Kingston, RI, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kolbe", 
        "givenName": "Jason J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01122323154.63", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01122323154.63"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-006-3262-3", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018303695", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-006-3262-3"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-018-0787-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105885217", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-018-0787-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-009-0896-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038810539", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-009-0896-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-010-1004-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047957737", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-010-1004-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00442-014-2882-1", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026050777", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-014-2882-1"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/b:ueco.0000020169.86700.76", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050928774", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1023/b:ueco.0000020169.86700.76"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms9877", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032522234", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms9877"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00317818", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027684100", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00317818"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-010-0136-5", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028283365", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-010-0136-5"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10980-009-9323-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039482886", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-009-9323-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2019-03-30", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2019-03-30", 
    "description": "Behavioral adjustments may allow organisms to cope with the drastic environmental change caused by urbanization. We compared the escape behavior of Anolis lizards during simulated predator approaches on trees in both urban and forest habitats and on artificial structures (i.e., cement walls and metal posts) in urban areas. We found that urban lizards were less wary on trees, likely due at least in part to habituation to humans. In contrast, lizards on cement walls showed greater wariness, which may reflect a behavioral modification when escaping because of poor locomotor performance on this substrate. In both habitats, lizards modulated escape responses in ways consistent with their performance abilities on the various substrates. Escape by jumping decreased when lizards used wider and more isolated perches, which are characteristic of urban sites. Urban lizards squirreled (i.e., moved to the opposite side of a structure) more on wider trees and metal posts, and sprinted more but never jumped from cement walls. These behavioral responses for predator escape are consistent with the structural habitat changes caused by urbanization. Urban habitats had larger diameter trees, sparser ground vegetation, and many artificial structures. We found that urban lizards showed behavioral modulations because of exposure to humans as well as the locomotor constraints of using some artificial structures, such as cement walls. The ability of urban lizards to alter their escape responses and adjust to novel features of the habitat may be important traits of species able to colonize and persist in urban areas.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isFundedItemOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:grant.3582990", 
        "type": "MonetaryGrant"
      }
    ], 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1050124", 
        "issn": [
          "1083-8155", 
          "1573-1642"
        ], 
        "name": "Urban Ecosystems", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "4", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "22"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "urban lizards", 
      "Anolis lizards", 
      "structural habitat change", 
      "artificial structures", 
      "drastic environmental changes", 
      "large-diameter trees", 
      "forest habitats", 
      "escape response", 
      "predator escape", 
      "habitat change", 
      "important traits", 
      "urban habitats", 
      "simulated predator", 
      "poor locomotor performance", 
      "escape behavior", 
      "locomotor constraints", 
      "lizards", 
      "urbanization alters", 
      "habitats", 
      "ground vegetation", 
      "locomotor performance", 
      "environmental changes", 
      "greater wariness", 
      "diameter trees", 
      "urban areas", 
      "trees", 
      "wide trees", 
      "urban sites", 
      "predators", 
      "behavioral responses", 
      "organisms", 
      "perch", 
      "behavioral modulation", 
      "traits", 
      "species", 
      "urbanization", 
      "humans", 
      "vegetation", 
      "substrate", 
      "response", 
      "behavioral adjustment", 
      "behavioral modification", 
      "alters", 
      "novel features", 
      "ability", 
      "area", 
      "cement walls", 
      "sites", 
      "structure", 
      "wall", 
      "modification", 
      "changes", 
      "escape", 
      "modulation", 
      "contrast", 
      "wariness", 
      "city", 
      "exposure", 
      "part", 
      "features", 
      "behavior", 
      "habituation", 
      "constraints", 
      "performance ability", 
      "way", 
      "post", 
      "adjustment", 
      "metal posts", 
      "performance"
    ], 
    "name": "Escape in the city: urbanization alters the escape behavior of Anolis lizards", 
    "pagination": "733-742", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1113144186"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1113144186"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-09-02T16:04", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220902/entities/gbq_results/article/article_833.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

179 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      103 URIs      85 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author Ned486bb1ef2542aca9a70e6f88251cd0
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf00317818
5 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-009-0896-1
6 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-010-1004-2
7 sg:pub.10.1007/s00442-014-2882-1
8 sg:pub.10.1007/s10980-009-9323-2
9 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-006-3262-3
10 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-010-0136-5
11 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-018-0787-1
12 sg:pub.10.1023/b:ueco.0000020169.86700.76
13 sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms9877
14 schema:datePublished 2019-03-30
15 schema:datePublishedReg 2019-03-30
16 schema:description Behavioral adjustments may allow organisms to cope with the drastic environmental change caused by urbanization. We compared the escape behavior of Anolis lizards during simulated predator approaches on trees in both urban and forest habitats and on artificial structures (i.e., cement walls and metal posts) in urban areas. We found that urban lizards were less wary on trees, likely due at least in part to habituation to humans. In contrast, lizards on cement walls showed greater wariness, which may reflect a behavioral modification when escaping because of poor locomotor performance on this substrate. In both habitats, lizards modulated escape responses in ways consistent with their performance abilities on the various substrates. Escape by jumping decreased when lizards used wider and more isolated perches, which are characteristic of urban sites. Urban lizards squirreled (i.e., moved to the opposite side of a structure) more on wider trees and metal posts, and sprinted more but never jumped from cement walls. These behavioral responses for predator escape are consistent with the structural habitat changes caused by urbanization. Urban habitats had larger diameter trees, sparser ground vegetation, and many artificial structures. We found that urban lizards showed behavioral modulations because of exposure to humans as well as the locomotor constraints of using some artificial structures, such as cement walls. The ability of urban lizards to alter their escape responses and adjust to novel features of the habitat may be important traits of species able to colonize and persist in urban areas.
17 schema:genre article
18 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
19 schema:isPartOf N285fcb82e233424795a2914266018976
20 Nae6da14a7ba04f4984f1e16627e251c6
21 sg:journal.1050124
22 schema:keywords Anolis lizards
23 ability
24 adjustment
25 alters
26 area
27 artificial structures
28 behavior
29 behavioral adjustment
30 behavioral modification
31 behavioral modulation
32 behavioral responses
33 cement walls
34 changes
35 city
36 constraints
37 contrast
38 diameter trees
39 drastic environmental changes
40 environmental changes
41 escape
42 escape behavior
43 escape response
44 exposure
45 features
46 forest habitats
47 greater wariness
48 ground vegetation
49 habitat change
50 habitats
51 habituation
52 humans
53 important traits
54 large-diameter trees
55 lizards
56 locomotor constraints
57 locomotor performance
58 metal posts
59 modification
60 modulation
61 novel features
62 organisms
63 part
64 perch
65 performance
66 performance ability
67 poor locomotor performance
68 post
69 predator escape
70 predators
71 response
72 simulated predator
73 sites
74 species
75 structural habitat change
76 structure
77 substrate
78 traits
79 trees
80 urban areas
81 urban habitats
82 urban lizards
83 urban sites
84 urbanization
85 urbanization alters
86 vegetation
87 wall
88 wariness
89 way
90 wide trees
91 schema:name Escape in the city: urbanization alters the escape behavior of Anolis lizards
92 schema:pagination 733-742
93 schema:productId N0130111d71c74ea4bd8e1cdfde3fb9f8
94 N0f64f47a9ef9491c9bd72bd46531a11e
95 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1113144186
96 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x
97 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-09-02T16:04
98 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
99 schema:sdPublisher N34a54a44bbb6444eb2ee3eb2fff60c54
100 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x
101 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
102 sgo:sdDataset articles
103 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
104 N0130111d71c74ea4bd8e1cdfde3fb9f8 schema:name dimensions_id
105 schema:value pub.1113144186
106 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
107 N0f64f47a9ef9491c9bd72bd46531a11e schema:name doi
108 schema:value 10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x
109 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
110 N285fcb82e233424795a2914266018976 schema:volumeNumber 22
111 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
112 N34a54a44bbb6444eb2ee3eb2fff60c54 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
113 rdf:type schema:Organization
114 Nae6da14a7ba04f4984f1e16627e251c6 schema:issueNumber 4
115 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
116 Ncf3d051aaf314eb09f4c0753e14b7c6a rdf:first sg:person.01122323154.63
117 rdf:rest rdf:nil
118 Ned486bb1ef2542aca9a70e6f88251cd0 rdf:first sg:person.010141601371.21
119 rdf:rest Ncf3d051aaf314eb09f4c0753e14b7c6a
120 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
121 schema:name Biological Sciences
122 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
123 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
124 schema:name Ecology
125 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
126 sg:grant.3582990 http://pending.schema.org/fundedItem sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-019-00845-x
127 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
128 sg:journal.1050124 schema:issn 1083-8155
129 1573-1642
130 schema:name Urban Ecosystems
131 schema:publisher Springer Nature
132 rdf:type schema:Periodical
133 sg:person.010141601371.21 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.266685.9
134 schema:familyName Avilés-Rodríguez
135 schema:givenName Kevin J.
136 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010141601371.21
137 rdf:type schema:Person
138 sg:person.01122323154.63 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.20431.34
139 schema:familyName Kolbe
140 schema:givenName Jason J.
141 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01122323154.63
142 rdf:type schema:Person
143 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00317818 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027684100
144 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00317818
145 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
146 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-009-0896-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038810539
147 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-009-0896-1
148 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
149 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-010-1004-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047957737
150 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-010-1004-2
151 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
152 sg:pub.10.1007/s00442-014-2882-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026050777
153 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-014-2882-1
154 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
155 sg:pub.10.1007/s10980-009-9323-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039482886
156 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10980-009-9323-2
157 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
158 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-006-3262-3 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018303695
159 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-006-3262-3
160 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
161 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-010-0136-5 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028283365
162 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-010-0136-5
163 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
164 sg:pub.10.1007/s11252-018-0787-1 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105885217
165 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11252-018-0787-1
166 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
167 sg:pub.10.1023/b:ueco.0000020169.86700.76 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050928774
168 https://doi.org/10.1023/b:ueco.0000020169.86700.76
169 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
170 sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms9877 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032522234
171 https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms9877
172 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
173 grid-institutes:grid.20431.34 schema:alternateName Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 02881, Kingston, RI, USA
174 schema:name Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 02881, Kingston, RI, USA
175 rdf:type schema:Organization
176 grid-institutes:grid.266685.9 schema:alternateName Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Boston, 02125, Boston, MA, USA
177 schema:name Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, 02881, Kingston, RI, USA
178 Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Boston, 02125, Boston, MA, USA
179 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...