Presenting Their Gendered Selves? How Women and Men Describe Who They Are, What They Have Done, and Why They Want ... View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2019-02-16

AUTHORS

Jessi Streib, Jane Rochmes, Felicia Arriaga, Carlos Tavares, Emi Weed

ABSTRACT

Occupational segregation is due, at least in part, to differences in what jobs women and men apply to and how they are evaluated. However, we know little about one mechanism that may relate to employers’ evaluations and, therefore, to occupational segregation: how applicants present themselves to employers. Theories of gender presentation offer competing predictions of how applicants present themselves to employers and empirical studies have not fully examined the issue. We address this theoretical ambiguity and empirical gap by drawing upon 1124 randomly selected applications that U.S. women and men used to apply for the same high-status job. After conducting a content analysis, we found that women and men present themselves similarly in terms of why they want the job and what experiences they have, but differently in terms of who they are and what information they divulge. We conclude that different aspects of applications correspond to different theories of gender presentation, but that most of the evidence supports a perspective of minimal gender differences. The present study implies that one way to combat occupational segregation that occurs due to employers’ essentialist beliefs is to point them to how women and men actually present themselves in their applications. More... »

PAGES

610-626

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1112196925


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/16", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Studies in Human Society", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1699", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Other Studies In Human Society", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, 27708, Durham, NC, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26009.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, 27708, Durham, NC, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Streib", 
        "givenName": "Jessi", 
        "id": "sg:person.07363423515.09", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07363423515.09"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.254213.3", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Rochmes", 
        "givenName": "Jane", 
        "id": "sg:person.011030661143.40", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011030661143.40"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Sociology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.252323.7", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Sociology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Arriaga", 
        "givenName": "Felicia", 
        "id": "sg:person.013061643157.16", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013061643157.16"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.258879.9", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Tavares", 
        "givenName": "Carlos", 
        "id": "sg:person.012423622143.44", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012423622143.44"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, 27708, Durham, NC, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26009.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, 27708, Durham, NC, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Weed", 
        "givenName": "Emi", 
        "id": "sg:person.015572760147.33", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015572760147.33"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-017-0781-8", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1085195525", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-017-0781-8"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-007-9282-5", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049979771", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9282-5"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-007-9187-3", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017706915", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9187-3"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-017-0890-4", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1100247117", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-017-0890-4"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1005522707921", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050910871", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1005522707921"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2019-02-16", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2019-02-16", 
    "description": "Occupational segregation is due, at least in part, to differences in what jobs women and men apply to and how they are evaluated. However, we know little about one mechanism that may relate to employers\u2019 evaluations and, therefore, to occupational segregation: how applicants present themselves to employers. Theories of gender presentation offer competing predictions of how applicants present themselves to employers and empirical studies have not fully examined the issue. We address this theoretical ambiguity and empirical gap by drawing upon 1124 randomly selected applications that U.S. women and men used to apply for the same high-status job. After conducting a content analysis, we found that women and men present themselves similarly in terms of why they want the job and what experiences they have, but differently in terms of who they are and what information they divulge. We conclude that different aspects of applications correspond to different theories of gender presentation, but that most of the evidence supports a perspective of minimal gender differences. The present study implies that one way to combat occupational segregation that occurs due to employers\u2019 essentialist beliefs is to point them to how women and men actually present themselves in their applications.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1084414", 
        "issn": [
          "0360-0025", 
          "1573-2762"
        ], 
        "name": "Sex Roles", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "9-10", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "81"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "occupational segregation", 
      "higher status jobs", 
      "gender presentation", 
      "jobs women", 
      "empirical gap", 
      "minimal gender differences", 
      "content analysis", 
      "employers", 
      "gender differences", 
      "essentialist beliefs", 
      "empirical study", 
      "theoretical ambiguity", 
      "jobs", 
      "U.S. women", 
      "different theories", 
      "women", 
      "employers\u2019 evaluations", 
      "applicants", 
      "men", 
      "segregation", 
      "perspective", 
      "theory", 
      "experience", 
      "different aspects", 
      "issues", 
      "beliefs", 
      "offer", 
      "way", 
      "self", 
      "ambiguity", 
      "gap", 
      "terms", 
      "aspects", 
      "part", 
      "study", 
      "differences", 
      "evidence", 
      "analysis", 
      "evaluation", 
      "information", 
      "presentation", 
      "present study", 
      "mechanism", 
      "applications", 
      "prediction", 
      "gender presentation offer", 
      "presentation offer", 
      "same high-status job", 
      "Written Applications"
    ], 
    "name": "Presenting Their Gendered Selves? How Women and Men Describe Who They Are, What They Have Done, and Why They Want the Job in Their Written Applications", 
    "pagination": "610-626", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1112196925"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1112196925"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2021-12-01T19:44", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20211201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_810.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

164 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      79 URIs      66 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y schema:about anzsrc-for:16
2 anzsrc-for:1699
3 schema:author Nfae1b4b25f6246049e3948e41747c47f
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-007-9187-3
5 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-007-9282-5
6 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-017-0781-8
7 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-017-0890-4
8 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1005522707921
9 schema:datePublished 2019-02-16
10 schema:datePublishedReg 2019-02-16
11 schema:description Occupational segregation is due, at least in part, to differences in what jobs women and men apply to and how they are evaluated. However, we know little about one mechanism that may relate to employers’ evaluations and, therefore, to occupational segregation: how applicants present themselves to employers. Theories of gender presentation offer competing predictions of how applicants present themselves to employers and empirical studies have not fully examined the issue. We address this theoretical ambiguity and empirical gap by drawing upon 1124 randomly selected applications that U.S. women and men used to apply for the same high-status job. After conducting a content analysis, we found that women and men present themselves similarly in terms of why they want the job and what experiences they have, but differently in terms of who they are and what information they divulge. We conclude that different aspects of applications correspond to different theories of gender presentation, but that most of the evidence supports a perspective of minimal gender differences. The present study implies that one way to combat occupational segregation that occurs due to employers’ essentialist beliefs is to point them to how women and men actually present themselves in their applications.
12 schema:genre article
13 schema:inLanguage en
14 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
15 schema:isPartOf N68913d90b5204b6a89fc2052b3598b2b
16 N6be83d6ed03e4fc3ae544f1e6b844089
17 sg:journal.1084414
18 schema:keywords U.S. women
19 Written Applications
20 ambiguity
21 analysis
22 applicants
23 applications
24 aspects
25 beliefs
26 content analysis
27 differences
28 different aspects
29 different theories
30 empirical gap
31 empirical study
32 employers
33 employers’ evaluations
34 essentialist beliefs
35 evaluation
36 evidence
37 experience
38 gap
39 gender differences
40 gender presentation
41 gender presentation offer
42 higher status jobs
43 information
44 issues
45 jobs
46 jobs women
47 mechanism
48 men
49 minimal gender differences
50 occupational segregation
51 offer
52 part
53 perspective
54 prediction
55 present study
56 presentation
57 presentation offer
58 same high-status job
59 segregation
60 self
61 study
62 terms
63 theoretical ambiguity
64 theory
65 way
66 women
67 schema:name Presenting Their Gendered Selves? How Women and Men Describe Who They Are, What They Have Done, and Why They Want the Job in Their Written Applications
68 schema:pagination 610-626
69 schema:productId N5e093be905454a5985a9bb7fa25a0c80
70 Ne616b49e07864810885feb1dfa005045
71 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1112196925
72 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y
73 schema:sdDatePublished 2021-12-01T19:44
74 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
75 schema:sdPublisher N76c9d9ad6ea24a2baefa7cd0eee40c4a
76 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y
77 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
78 sgo:sdDataset articles
79 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
80 N1e189245f10d424baba4f5101c180da9 rdf:first sg:person.011030661143.40
81 rdf:rest Nabe57f0347e14cc8873a83d1e1522906
82 N5e093be905454a5985a9bb7fa25a0c80 schema:name doi
83 schema:value 10.1007/s11199-019-1016-y
84 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
85 N68913d90b5204b6a89fc2052b3598b2b schema:issueNumber 9-10
86 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
87 N6be83d6ed03e4fc3ae544f1e6b844089 schema:volumeNumber 81
88 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
89 N76c9d9ad6ea24a2baefa7cd0eee40c4a schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
90 rdf:type schema:Organization
91 Nabe57f0347e14cc8873a83d1e1522906 rdf:first sg:person.013061643157.16
92 rdf:rest Nba5750ee8e504101b4a0c76113e24963
93 Nba1cfcf598a94021b0ad343c6d81ce90 rdf:first sg:person.015572760147.33
94 rdf:rest rdf:nil
95 Nba5750ee8e504101b4a0c76113e24963 rdf:first sg:person.012423622143.44
96 rdf:rest Nba1cfcf598a94021b0ad343c6d81ce90
97 Ne616b49e07864810885feb1dfa005045 schema:name dimensions_id
98 schema:value pub.1112196925
99 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
100 Nfae1b4b25f6246049e3948e41747c47f rdf:first sg:person.07363423515.09
101 rdf:rest N1e189245f10d424baba4f5101c180da9
102 anzsrc-for:16 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
103 schema:name Studies in Human Society
104 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
105 anzsrc-for:1699 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
106 schema:name Other Studies In Human Society
107 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
108 sg:journal.1084414 schema:issn 0360-0025
109 1573-2762
110 schema:name Sex Roles
111 schema:publisher Springer Nature
112 rdf:type schema:Periodical
113 sg:person.011030661143.40 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.254213.3
114 schema:familyName Rochmes
115 schema:givenName Jane
116 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011030661143.40
117 rdf:type schema:Person
118 sg:person.012423622143.44 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.258879.9
119 schema:familyName Tavares
120 schema:givenName Carlos
121 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012423622143.44
122 rdf:type schema:Person
123 sg:person.013061643157.16 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.252323.7
124 schema:familyName Arriaga
125 schema:givenName Felicia
126 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013061643157.16
127 rdf:type schema:Person
128 sg:person.015572760147.33 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.26009.3d
129 schema:familyName Weed
130 schema:givenName Emi
131 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015572760147.33
132 rdf:type schema:Person
133 sg:person.07363423515.09 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.26009.3d
134 schema:familyName Streib
135 schema:givenName Jessi
136 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07363423515.09
137 rdf:type schema:Person
138 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-007-9187-3 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017706915
139 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9187-3
140 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
141 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-007-9282-5 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049979771
142 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-007-9282-5
143 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
144 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-017-0781-8 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1085195525
145 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-017-0781-8
146 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
147 sg:pub.10.1007/s11199-017-0890-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1100247117
148 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11199-017-0890-4
149 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
150 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1005522707921 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050910871
151 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1005522707921
152 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
153 grid-institutes:grid.252323.7 schema:alternateName Department of Sociology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA
154 schema:name Department of Sociology, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA
155 rdf:type schema:Organization
156 grid-institutes:grid.254213.3 schema:alternateName Department of Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, USA
157 schema:name Department of Sociology, Social Work & Anthropology, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, USA
158 rdf:type schema:Organization
159 grid-institutes:grid.258879.9 schema:alternateName Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA
160 schema:name Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA
161 rdf:type schema:Organization
162 grid-institutes:grid.26009.3d schema:alternateName Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, 27708, Durham, NC, USA
163 schema:name Department of Sociology, Duke University, Box 90088, 27708, Durham, NC, USA
164 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...