Minority Stress and the Risk of Unwanted Sexual Experiences in LGBQ Undergraduates View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2016-11-19

AUTHORS

Gabriel R. Murchison, Melanie A. Boyd, John E. Pachankis

ABSTRACT

Sexual assault is prevalent among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) college students, but its relationship to anti-LGBQ stigma has not been established. The goal of the present study was to determine whether minority stress, specifically internalized homophobia, predicted unwanted sexual experiences among LGBQ undergraduates (N = 763), whether routine behaviors (number of consensual sexual partners and alcohol use) mediated this relationship, and whether sense of LGBTQ community was a protective factor. Significant proportions of sexual minority men (10 %), women (18 %), and non-binary or transitioning students (19 %) reported an unwanted sexual experience since entering college. Internalized homophobia was associated with greater risk of unwanted sexual experiences. It also had a negative indirect effect on unwanted sexual experience risk through a negative association with number of sexual partners. Alcohol use did not mediate the relationship between internalized homophobia and unwanted sexual experiences. Sense of LGBTQ community was associated with lower risk, mediated by lower levels of internalized homophobia. The relationships between internalized homophobia and unwanted sexual experience risk were similar for women and men. These findings demonstrate that minority stress increases LGBQ students’ risk of sexual victimization and that in-group social relationships can mitigate this risk. We argue that minority stress is an important risk factor for sexual violence. Violence prevention interventions should attempt to reduce internalized homophobia, and colleges and high schools should establish LGBQ-affirming social climates and provide resources for LGBQ students, including targeted violence prevention efforts and programs that foster a sense of supportive community. More... »

PAGES

221-238

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1994-02. Men pressured and forced into sexual experience in ARCHIVES OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR
  • 2015-10-12. Gay-Related Rejection Sensitivity as a Risk Factor for Condomless Sex in AIDS AND BEHAVIOR
  • 2014-07-25. Stress and Coping with Racism and Their Role in Sexual Risk for HIV Among African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men in ARCHIVES OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR
  • 2013-07-18. Minority stress and physical health among sexual minority individuals in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE
  • 2012-12-12. The Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence among LGBTQ College Youth: The Role of Minority Stress in JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE
  • 2007-11-01. Interpersonal Factors in the Risk for Sexual Victimization and its Recurrence during Adolescence in JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE
  • 2013-02-15. Minority Stress Experiences and Psychological Well-Being: The Impact of Support from and Connection to Social Networks Within the Los Angeles House and Ball Communities in PREVENTION SCIENCE
  • 2008-02-01. Identifying Multiple Submissions in Internet Research: Preserving Data Integrity in AIDS AND BEHAVIOR
  • 2012-02-16. Sexual Orientation Disparities in Sexually Transmitted Infections: Examining the Intersection Between Sexual Identity and Sexual Behavior in ARCHIVES OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR
  • 2010-07-01. Sexuality Related Social Support Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth in JOURNAL OF YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE
  • 2013-12-07. Accounting for Space, Place and Identity: GLBTIQ Young Adults’ Experiences and Understandings of Unwanted Sexual Attention in Clubs and Pubs in CRITICAL CRIMINOLOGY
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s11199-016-0710-2

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11199-016-0710-2

    DIMENSIONS

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