Escape through Poland: Soviet Jewish Emigration in the 1950s View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2018-08

AUTHORS

Gennady Estraikh

ABSTRACT

The emigration movement among Soviet Jews is usually dated to the 1960s–1990s. This essay focuses on the premovement emigration in the 1950s, which prepared the ground for the massive departure of Jews and non-Jewish members of their families, primarily to Israel and the United States. The parameters for leaving the Soviet Union in the 1950s were in many ways similar to the parameters for returning to Poland in the immediate post–World War II years. On paper, the basic pools of emigrants were the same: Jews who at the outbreak of World War II were Polish nationals. In reality, many repatriates of the 1950s were more Soviet than Polish, leaving the country where they had lived for up to twenty years, which often was a lion’s share of their lives. Those—that is, the majority—who ultimately reached Israel went through two repatriation processes: first, as returnees to their pre–World War II homeland and, second, as Jews going back to their historical homeland. As this essay shows, the contemporaneous political and social climates in the Soviet Union and Poland, the nature of those countries’ mutual relations and of their relations with Israel, not present on the map until 1948, framed a unique context for emigration in the early post-Stalinist period. More... »

PAGES

291-317

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1104436385


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2103", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Historical Studies", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/21", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "History and Archaeology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "National Research University Higher School of Economics", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.410682.9", 
          "name": [
            "New York University, New York, USA", 
            "National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Estraikh", 
        "givenName": "Gennady", 
        "id": "sg:person.016361776221.05", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016361776221.05"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2018-08", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2018-08-01", 
    "description": "The emigration movement among Soviet Jews is usually dated to the 1960s\u20131990s. This essay focuses on the premovement emigration in the 1950s, which prepared the ground for the massive departure of Jews and non-Jewish members of their families, primarily to Israel and the United States. The parameters for leaving the Soviet Union in the 1950s were in many ways similar to the parameters for returning to Poland in the immediate post\u2013World War II years. On paper, the basic pools of emigrants were the same: Jews who at the outbreak of World War II were Polish nationals. In reality, many repatriates of the 1950s were more Soviet than Polish, leaving the country where they had lived for up to twenty years, which often was a lion\u2019s share of their lives. Those\u2014that is, the majority\u2014who ultimately reached Israel went through two repatriation processes: first, as returnees to their pre\u2013World War II homeland and, second, as Jews going back to their historical homeland. As this essay shows, the contemporaneous political and social climates in the Soviet Union and Poland, the nature of those countries\u2019 mutual relations and of their relations with Israel, not present on the map until 1948, framed a unique context for emigration in the early post-Stalinist period.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1136370", 
        "issn": [
          "0334-701X", 
          "1572-8579"
        ], 
        "name": "Jewish History", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "3-4", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "31"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Escape through Poland: Soviet Jewish Emigration in the 1950s", 
    "pagination": "291-317", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "f6318ad13ac561bb2c95e13e6e692b8addf113001cb7b9cc2b48870c407f56ff"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1104436385"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1104436385"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-11T10:15", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000348_0000000348/records_54297_00000001.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs10835-018-9286-4"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

62 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      27 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4 schema:about anzsrc-for:21
2 anzsrc-for:2103
3 schema:author N71ef80db9ec5464396a8cb48a3e1ff3a
4 schema:datePublished 2018-08
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2018-08-01
6 schema:description The emigration movement among Soviet Jews is usually dated to the 1960s–1990s. This essay focuses on the premovement emigration in the 1950s, which prepared the ground for the massive departure of Jews and non-Jewish members of their families, primarily to Israel and the United States. The parameters for leaving the Soviet Union in the 1950s were in many ways similar to the parameters for returning to Poland in the immediate post–World War II years. On paper, the basic pools of emigrants were the same: Jews who at the outbreak of World War II were Polish nationals. In reality, many repatriates of the 1950s were more Soviet than Polish, leaving the country where they had lived for up to twenty years, which often was a lion’s share of their lives. Those—that is, the majority—who ultimately reached Israel went through two repatriation processes: first, as returnees to their pre–World War II homeland and, second, as Jews going back to their historical homeland. As this essay shows, the contemporaneous political and social climates in the Soviet Union and Poland, the nature of those countries’ mutual relations and of their relations with Israel, not present on the map until 1948, framed a unique context for emigration in the early post-Stalinist period.
7 schema:genre research_article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf N668229edb4d54cf3aea9198c48984d1d
11 N8d7d3607f36945708304af4fc2e49961
12 sg:journal.1136370
13 schema:name Escape through Poland: Soviet Jewish Emigration in the 1950s
14 schema:pagination 291-317
15 schema:productId N1962023c418b4a4290bd03c25c436209
16 N2e54964f1aab4612b012e96c7009b07b
17 N76c262ed1df24e8580ea18e8959a2624
18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1104436385
19 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4
20 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-11T10:15
21 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
22 schema:sdPublisher N39ca644d152e4cb5987e970a4ca95ab0
23 schema:url https://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs10835-018-9286-4
24 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
25 sgo:sdDataset articles
26 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
27 N1962023c418b4a4290bd03c25c436209 schema:name readcube_id
28 schema:value f6318ad13ac561bb2c95e13e6e692b8addf113001cb7b9cc2b48870c407f56ff
29 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
30 N2e54964f1aab4612b012e96c7009b07b schema:name dimensions_id
31 schema:value pub.1104436385
32 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
33 N39ca644d152e4cb5987e970a4ca95ab0 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
34 rdf:type schema:Organization
35 N668229edb4d54cf3aea9198c48984d1d schema:volumeNumber 31
36 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
37 N71ef80db9ec5464396a8cb48a3e1ff3a rdf:first sg:person.016361776221.05
38 rdf:rest rdf:nil
39 N76c262ed1df24e8580ea18e8959a2624 schema:name doi
40 schema:value 10.1007/s10835-018-9286-4
41 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
42 N8d7d3607f36945708304af4fc2e49961 schema:issueNumber 3-4
43 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
44 anzsrc-for:21 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
45 schema:name History and Archaeology
46 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
47 anzsrc-for:2103 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
48 schema:name Historical Studies
49 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
50 sg:journal.1136370 schema:issn 0334-701X
51 1572-8579
52 schema:name Jewish History
53 rdf:type schema:Periodical
54 sg:person.016361776221.05 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.410682.9
55 schema:familyName Estraikh
56 schema:givenName Gennady
57 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016361776221.05
58 rdf:type schema:Person
59 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.410682.9 schema:alternateName National Research University Higher School of Economics
60 schema:name National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia
61 New York University, New York, USA
62 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...