Functional convergence and phenotypic divergence in two specialist species of pine-associated ladybirds View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2017-09-09

AUTHORS

Suzuki Noriyuki

ABSTRACT

Traditionally, convergent evolution has been considered to produce phenotypic similarity in independently evolved species. By contrast, recent studies have detected morphological divergence between species even in similar selective environments when different morphological traits combine to produce a specific functional output. However, it is still unclear whether a complex combination of non-morphological phenotypic traits, such as behavioural and life-history traits, can produce a similar performance in different species. In this study, I examined prey capture performance and related phenotypes in two sympatric ladybird species, Sospita oblongoguttata and Harmonia yedoensis, which specialize on the giant pine aphid, which is known to be elusive for ladybird hatchlings. In particular, I focused on egg size and proportion of trophic eggs in the clutch, since the amount of maternal investment per offspring can contribute to prey capture performance of ladybird hatchlings. Predation success of hatchlings against the giant pine aphid was higher in both S. oblongoguttata and H. yedoensis than in Harmonia axyridis, a generalist ladybird species that feeds on various kinds of aphid species in nature. Sospita oblongoguttata females, however, produced relatively larger eggs and in most clutches provided no trophic eggs, whereas H. yedoensis females produced smaller eggs and provided more trophic eggs per clutch. Moreover, hatchling morphology in H. yedoensis more closely resembled that of its congener, H. axyridis, than that of the more distantly related S. oblongoguttata, although like H. yedoensis, S. oblongoguttata predates on the elusive pine aphid. These results in two pine-associated specialist ladybirds indicate that divergent phenotypes can nonetheless have similar prey capture performance. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that the general ultimate function can be achieved by various mechanisms through convergence that operates at different level of life. More... »

PAGES

885-898

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10682-017-9918-z

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10682-017-9918-z

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1091513088


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