What students want? Experiences, challenges, and engagement during Emergency Remote Learning amidst COVID-19 crisis View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2021-10-20

AUTHORS

Rucha Tulaskar, Markku Turunen

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has affected the entire world in many ways. It has sparked a prominent pedagogical shift for university level students, as it has changed the way students learn, attend classes, or communicate with teachers. Globally, every student is forced to adopt Emergency Remote Learning (ERL) as a result of immediate transformation of physical classes into remote education. This two-fold study investigated the differences between traditional distance, online, and virtual learning solutions and the new Emergency Remote Learning (ERL) method for the university level education. Furthermore, a pragmatic mix-method study is conducted in the form of surveys, semi-structured interviews, and diary study spanning across 10 months of pandemic, to examine self-reported insights on ERL challenges, experiences, and learning engagement of the students from Finland and India. Cumulative findings suggest that scheduling, distractions, pessimistic emotions, longer durations, and concentration were the highest challenges faced by the students which impacted their learning experiences and engagement. The study also found that the ERL specific factors like low-interactivity, technical limitations, non-structured, and non-standardized methods had a prominent impact on the effectiveness of remote education. Furthermore, the study has suggested guidelines for improving remote learning experience as a futuristic solution beyond COVID-19 pandemic. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s10639-021-10747-1. More... »

PAGES

1-37

References to SciGraph publications

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10639-021-10747-1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10639-021-10747-1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1141982416

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34690527


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