Plural media ethics? Reformist Islam in India and the limits of global media ethics View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2021-06-19

AUTHORS

Max Kramer

ABSTRACT

The transatlantic field of global media ethics is premised on a search for the conceptual foundations of plurality. This article is a critique of this very endeavor. I offer this critique through works authored by moral anthropologists of Islam and through a close reading of the Urdu text Cyberistan: Muslim Naujavan Aur Social Media (Cyberistan: Muslim Youth and Social Media) authored by Sadatullah Husaini, the current president of the Indian reformist Islamic organization Jamaat-e-Islami Hind. My article is a post-foundational critique of the implicit foundationalism through which “Islam” and “plurality” are related to each other within inquiries into the ethics of digital communication. I take on digital communication because of its increasingly global and synchronic nature that rendered questions concerning plurality in media ethics particularly urgent. I argue that even though it is important to ask what difference means conceptually for a global media ethics today, it can only make space for radical plurality via the negative, by way of its contradictions and structural constraints. If a global media ethics is supposed to be based on openness and plurality, it can be so only by limiting and weakening its own ontological claims – beyond positive metaphysical groundings, cultures, civilizations, Islam, etc. In other words, it requires a reflexivity to its own position as an academic discipline that produces knowledge under certain historical conditions and an understanding of its own political practice. More... »

PAGES

275-296

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2013. Ethics of Media in NONE
  • 2015. Role of Social Media in Disseminating Dakwah (Peranan Media Sosial dalam Penyebaran Dakwah) in ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVES RELATING TO BUSINESS, ARTS, CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10624-021-09626-5

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10624-021-09626-5

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1139011548

    PUBMED

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34720338


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