Beetle assemblages in rainforest gaps along a subtropical to tropical latitudinal gradient View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2017-02-28

AUTHORS

Elinya Watkins, Roger L. Kitching, Akihiro Nakamura, Nigel E. Stork

ABSTRACT

Successional processes in forest gaps created by tree falls are often considered a principal mechanism maintaining species diversity within forests. Although insects are important as mediators of forest recovery processes, there have been few observations of how they differ between forest gaps and non-gaps across latitudes. Here we tested the impacts of gap habitat on beetle assemblage composition at three locations spanning sub-tropical and tropical biomes (28°S, 16°S, 5°N: Lamington and Daintree in Australia, and Danum in Borneo). Beetles were collected by flight interception traps and sorted to family and feeding guilds. Despite clear differences in environmental conditions between gaps and non-gaps at all three location, we found weak and inconsistent differences in beetle family and feeding guild composition across a latitudinal gradient. PERMANOVA results showed no significant differences in beetle family and feeding guild composition between gaps and non-gaps. For beetle families, however, the interaction effect (between gap vs. non-gap treatment and location) was significant. Post-hoc analysis and NMDS ordinations showed significant and clear separation of family assemblages between gaps and non-gaps within the Danum samples but not within samples from either the Lamington or Daintree sites. Using IndVal, when all three locations were combined, Chrysomelidae and Tenebrionidae were found to be indicators for gaps and Scarabaeinae and Leiodidae for non-gaps. Analysed separately, gap indicators were only Chrysomelidae at Daintree, whereas non-gap indicators were Scarabaeinae at Lamington, Scarabaeinae, all other Scarabaeidae, Anthicidae, Scydmaeninae, and Hybosoridae at Danum. We suggest the scale of changes in insect composition and richness with the creation of a natural light gap in forests contrast with those resulting from anthropogenic disturbance such as logging and clearing of forests and the greater adaptability of forests to small-scale changes rather than large-scale changes. More... »

PAGES

1689-1703

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1084025201


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/05", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Environmental Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0502", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Environmental Science and Management", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1022.1", 
          "name": [
            "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Watkins", 
        "givenName": "Elinya", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1022.1", 
          "name": [
            "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kitching", 
        "givenName": "Roger L.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0625706144.58", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0625706144.58"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, 666303, Mengla, Yunnan, China", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.458477.d", 
          "name": [
            "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia", 
            "Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, 666303, Mengla, Yunnan, China"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Nakamura", 
        "givenName": "Akihiro", 
        "id": "sg:person.01167054044.76", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01167054044.76"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1022.1", 
          "name": [
            "Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Stork", 
        "givenName": "Nigel E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0617300744.36", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0617300744.36"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/34166", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045588449", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/34166"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10531-009-9575-9", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013967500", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-009-9575-9"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s004420100651", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041840848", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420100651"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s004420050579", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033971214", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050579"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/nature10425", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024450528", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10425"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms7836", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030400031", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7836"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2017-02-28", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2017-02-28", 
    "description": "Successional processes in forest gaps created by tree falls are often considered a principal mechanism maintaining species diversity within forests. Although insects are important as mediators of forest recovery processes, there have been few observations of how they differ between forest gaps and non-gaps across latitudes. Here we tested the impacts of gap habitat on beetle assemblage composition at three locations spanning sub-tropical and tropical biomes (28\u00b0S, 16\u00b0S, 5\u00b0N: Lamington and Daintree in Australia, and Danum in Borneo). Beetles were collected by flight interception traps and sorted to family and feeding guilds. Despite clear differences in environmental conditions between gaps and non-gaps at all three location, we found weak and inconsistent differences in beetle family and feeding guild composition across a latitudinal gradient. PERMANOVA results showed no significant differences in beetle family and feeding guild composition between gaps and non-gaps. For beetle families, however, the interaction effect (between gap vs. non-gap treatment and location) was significant. Post-hoc analysis and NMDS ordinations showed significant and clear separation of family assemblages between gaps and non-gaps within the Danum samples but not within samples from either the Lamington or Daintree sites. Using IndVal, when all three locations were combined, Chrysomelidae and Tenebrionidae were found to be indicators for gaps and Scarabaeinae and Leiodidae for non-gaps. Analysed separately, gap indicators were only Chrysomelidae at Daintree, whereas non-gap indicators were Scarabaeinae at Lamington, Scarabaeinae, all other Scarabaeidae, Anthicidae, Scydmaeninae, and Hybosoridae at Danum. We suggest the scale of changes in insect composition and richness with the creation of a natural light gap in forests contrast with those resulting from anthropogenic disturbance such as logging and clearing of forests and the greater adaptability of forests to small-scale changes rather than large-scale changes.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1128750", 
        "issn": [
          "0960-3115", 
          "1572-9710"
        ], 
        "name": "Biodiversity and Conservation", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "7", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "26"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "beetle families", 
      "guild composition", 
      "forest gaps", 
      "latitudinal gradient", 
      "beetle assemblage composition", 
      "forest recovery process", 
      "flight interception traps", 
      "clearing of forests", 
      "rainforest gaps", 
      "successional processes", 
      "PERMANOVA results", 
      "anthropogenic disturbance", 
      "species diversity", 
      "gap habitats", 
      "assemblage composition", 
      "tropical biomes", 
      "feeding guilds", 
      "NMDS ordination", 
      "insect composition", 
      "interception traps", 
      "small-scale changes", 
      "large-scale changes", 
      "light gaps", 
      "tree fall", 
      "forest", 
      "family assemblage", 
      "scale of change", 
      "Scarabaeinae", 
      "environmental conditions", 
      "Lamington", 
      "beetles", 
      "Chrysomelidae", 
      "greater adaptability", 
      "inconsistent differences", 
      "clear differences", 
      "indicators", 
      "composition", 
      "clear separation", 
      "gradient", 
      "IndVal", 
      "biome", 
      "richness", 
      "habitats", 
      "guilds", 
      "ordination", 
      "Danum", 
      "gap indicator", 
      "Daintree", 
      "assemblages", 
      "Scarabaeidae", 
      "clearing", 
      "diversity", 
      "Leiodidae", 
      "Tenebrionidae", 
      "principal mechanism", 
      "Anthicidae", 
      "insects", 
      "location", 
      "changes", 
      "disturbances", 
      "recovery process", 
      "latitudes", 
      "sites", 
      "traps", 
      "impact", 
      "gap", 
      "scale", 
      "Hybosoridae", 
      "samples", 
      "differences", 
      "adaptability", 
      "interaction effects", 
      "significant differences", 
      "process", 
      "fall", 
      "conditions", 
      "family", 
      "Scydmaeninae", 
      "effect", 
      "observations", 
      "results", 
      "creation", 
      "analysis", 
      "mechanism", 
      "mediators", 
      "separation", 
      "post"
    ], 
    "name": "Beetle assemblages in rainforest gaps along a subtropical to tropical latitudinal gradient", 
    "pagination": "1689-1703", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1084025201"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1084025201"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-08-04T17:06", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220804/entities/gbq_results/article/article_744.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

200 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      119 URIs      103 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8 schema:about anzsrc-for:05
2 anzsrc-for:0502
3 anzsrc-for:06
4 anzsrc-for:0602
5 schema:author Nbb091ed64cf4476e85908210004fbf95
6 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/s004420050579
7 sg:pub.10.1007/s004420100651
8 sg:pub.10.1007/s10531-009-9575-9
9 sg:pub.10.1038/34166
10 sg:pub.10.1038/nature10425
11 sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms7836
12 schema:datePublished 2017-02-28
13 schema:datePublishedReg 2017-02-28
14 schema:description Successional processes in forest gaps created by tree falls are often considered a principal mechanism maintaining species diversity within forests. Although insects are important as mediators of forest recovery processes, there have been few observations of how they differ between forest gaps and non-gaps across latitudes. Here we tested the impacts of gap habitat on beetle assemblage composition at three locations spanning sub-tropical and tropical biomes (28°S, 16°S, 5°N: Lamington and Daintree in Australia, and Danum in Borneo). Beetles were collected by flight interception traps and sorted to family and feeding guilds. Despite clear differences in environmental conditions between gaps and non-gaps at all three location, we found weak and inconsistent differences in beetle family and feeding guild composition across a latitudinal gradient. PERMANOVA results showed no significant differences in beetle family and feeding guild composition between gaps and non-gaps. For beetle families, however, the interaction effect (between gap vs. non-gap treatment and location) was significant. Post-hoc analysis and NMDS ordinations showed significant and clear separation of family assemblages between gaps and non-gaps within the Danum samples but not within samples from either the Lamington or Daintree sites. Using IndVal, when all three locations were combined, Chrysomelidae and Tenebrionidae were found to be indicators for gaps and Scarabaeinae and Leiodidae for non-gaps. Analysed separately, gap indicators were only Chrysomelidae at Daintree, whereas non-gap indicators were Scarabaeinae at Lamington, Scarabaeinae, all other Scarabaeidae, Anthicidae, Scydmaeninae, and Hybosoridae at Danum. We suggest the scale of changes in insect composition and richness with the creation of a natural light gap in forests contrast with those resulting from anthropogenic disturbance such as logging and clearing of forests and the greater adaptability of forests to small-scale changes rather than large-scale changes.
15 schema:genre article
16 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
17 schema:isPartOf N140efb9b1d80431f989f7d87290b8486
18 Na641a07e72c74adca4af07dace90acf0
19 sg:journal.1128750
20 schema:keywords Anthicidae
21 Chrysomelidae
22 Daintree
23 Danum
24 Hybosoridae
25 IndVal
26 Lamington
27 Leiodidae
28 NMDS ordination
29 PERMANOVA results
30 Scarabaeidae
31 Scarabaeinae
32 Scydmaeninae
33 Tenebrionidae
34 adaptability
35 analysis
36 anthropogenic disturbance
37 assemblage composition
38 assemblages
39 beetle assemblage composition
40 beetle families
41 beetles
42 biome
43 changes
44 clear differences
45 clear separation
46 clearing
47 clearing of forests
48 composition
49 conditions
50 creation
51 differences
52 disturbances
53 diversity
54 effect
55 environmental conditions
56 fall
57 family
58 family assemblage
59 feeding guilds
60 flight interception traps
61 forest
62 forest gaps
63 forest recovery process
64 gap
65 gap habitats
66 gap indicator
67 gradient
68 greater adaptability
69 guild composition
70 guilds
71 habitats
72 impact
73 inconsistent differences
74 indicators
75 insect composition
76 insects
77 interaction effects
78 interception traps
79 large-scale changes
80 latitudes
81 latitudinal gradient
82 light gaps
83 location
84 mechanism
85 mediators
86 observations
87 ordination
88 post
89 principal mechanism
90 process
91 rainforest gaps
92 recovery process
93 results
94 richness
95 samples
96 scale
97 scale of change
98 separation
99 significant differences
100 sites
101 small-scale changes
102 species diversity
103 successional processes
104 traps
105 tree fall
106 tropical biomes
107 schema:name Beetle assemblages in rainforest gaps along a subtropical to tropical latitudinal gradient
108 schema:pagination 1689-1703
109 schema:productId N3281dd92d37d4d1bab61d49258430124
110 Nb0efbdb99e9c41209fca080f612a4a64
111 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1084025201
112 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8
113 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-08-04T17:06
114 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
115 schema:sdPublisher N159ef3a0e34e4398a67a0ec8859e6726
116 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8
117 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
118 sgo:sdDataset articles
119 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
120 N0a407f1de8ab45df8f1eda46539ca3c1 rdf:first sg:person.01167054044.76
121 rdf:rest Nda5aebc780214d78a5a8e149fc008bd6
122 N140efb9b1d80431f989f7d87290b8486 schema:volumeNumber 26
123 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
124 N159ef3a0e34e4398a67a0ec8859e6726 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
125 rdf:type schema:Organization
126 N3281dd92d37d4d1bab61d49258430124 schema:name dimensions_id
127 schema:value pub.1084025201
128 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
129 Na641a07e72c74adca4af07dace90acf0 schema:issueNumber 7
130 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
131 Nb0efbdb99e9c41209fca080f612a4a64 schema:name doi
132 schema:value 10.1007/s10531-017-1326-8
133 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
134 Nbb091ed64cf4476e85908210004fbf95 rdf:first Nc83f3c9755674b8aaff979025c7d311a
135 rdf:rest Nc9de1597e74d47018c8e03152ac81c76
136 Nc83f3c9755674b8aaff979025c7d311a schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1022.1
137 schema:familyName Watkins
138 schema:givenName Elinya
139 rdf:type schema:Person
140 Nc9de1597e74d47018c8e03152ac81c76 rdf:first sg:person.0625706144.58
141 rdf:rest N0a407f1de8ab45df8f1eda46539ca3c1
142 Nda5aebc780214d78a5a8e149fc008bd6 rdf:first sg:person.0617300744.36
143 rdf:rest rdf:nil
144 anzsrc-for:05 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
145 schema:name Environmental Sciences
146 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
147 anzsrc-for:0502 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
148 schema:name Environmental Science and Management
149 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
150 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
151 schema:name Biological Sciences
152 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
153 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
154 schema:name Ecology
155 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
156 sg:journal.1128750 schema:issn 0960-3115
157 1572-9710
158 schema:name Biodiversity and Conservation
159 schema:publisher Springer Nature
160 rdf:type schema:Periodical
161 sg:person.01167054044.76 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.458477.d
162 schema:familyName Nakamura
163 schema:givenName Akihiro
164 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01167054044.76
165 rdf:type schema:Person
166 sg:person.0617300744.36 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1022.1
167 schema:familyName Stork
168 schema:givenName Nigel E.
169 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0617300744.36
170 rdf:type schema:Person
171 sg:person.0625706144.58 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1022.1
172 schema:familyName Kitching
173 schema:givenName Roger L.
174 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0625706144.58
175 rdf:type schema:Person
176 sg:pub.10.1007/s004420050579 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033971214
177 https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050579
178 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
179 sg:pub.10.1007/s004420100651 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041840848
180 https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420100651
181 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
182 sg:pub.10.1007/s10531-009-9575-9 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1013967500
183 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-009-9575-9
184 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
185 sg:pub.10.1038/34166 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045588449
186 https://doi.org/10.1038/34166
187 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
188 sg:pub.10.1038/nature10425 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024450528
189 https://doi.org/10.1038/nature10425
190 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
191 sg:pub.10.1038/ncomms7836 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030400031
192 https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms7836
193 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
194 grid-institutes:grid.1022.1 schema:alternateName Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia
195 schema:name Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia
196 rdf:type schema:Organization
197 grid-institutes:grid.458477.d schema:alternateName Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, 666303, Mengla, Yunnan, China
198 schema:name Environmental Futures Research Institute & Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, 4111, Nathan, QLD, Australia
199 Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, 666303, Mengla, Yunnan, China
200 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...