Recreationist behaviour in forests and the disturbance of wildlife View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2012-08-23

AUTHORS

Mariella Marzano, Norman Dandy

ABSTRACT

Forests are popular locations for outdoor recreation and there is considerable evidence highlighting the positive social impacts of these activities. There is also a body of research outlining the range of potentially negative impacts of recreation on wildlife and habitats. This paper provides a summary of current social and natural scientific knowledge on disturbance caused by walking, cycling, mountain biking, horse riding, off-road vehicles use, camping, and some other recreational activities in forests. We identify more than 40 ecological studies of recreational impacts on forests. Greatest attention has been directed towards walking as an activity and the impacts upon birds, soils and flora although long-term ecological studies of wildlife or habitat disturbance are scarce. Impacts include trampling by foot, hoof and tyre, animal behaviour change and the spread of pests and pathogens. Considerably less work has been carried out on the social dimensions of recreational disturbance. In this article the authors draw on behaviour theory in an attempt to identify the key factors influencing human behaviour in the context of recreational disturbance. Cognitive theories highlight the importance of attitudes and behavioural control, whilst social practice theories emphasise the impact of behavioural routines and contexts. Management actions may be better targeted at promoting alternative behaviours rather than trying to prevent current ‘problem’ behaviours. We advocate greater engagement with these theories to better integrate social science with ecological studies, and improve understanding and management of interactions between recreation needs and conservation. More... »

PAGES

2967-2986

References to SciGraph publications

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  • 2000-10. The effects of trampling on assemblages of ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) in urban forests in Helsinki, Finland in URBAN ECOSYSTEMS
  • 2008-09-05. Response to human presence during nocturnal line transect surveys in fallow deer (Dama dama) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH
  • 2001-12. The ecological response of forest ground flora and soils to experimental trampling in British urban woodlands in URBAN ECOSYSTEMS
  • 2002-06. Disturbance of forest by trampling: Effects on mycorrhizal roots of seedlings and mature trees of Fagus sylvatica in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 2006-04. Macrofaunal Loss and Microhabitat Destruction: The Impact of Trampling in a Temperate Mangrove Forest, NSW Australia in WETLANDS ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT
  • 2006-01. Effects of fragmentation and trampling on carabid beetle assemblages in urban woodlands in Helsinki, Finland in URBAN ECOSYSTEMS
  • 2010-04-07. The effect of recreational homes on willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) in a mountain area of Norway in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH
  • 2007-03-28. Effects of off-road vehicles on reproductive success of pine snakes (Pituophus melanoleucus) in the New Jersey pinelands in URBAN ECOSYSTEMS
  • 2009-03-06. Disturbances to great bustards (Otis tarda) in central Spain: human activities, bird responses and management implications in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE RESEARCH
  • 2007-03-07. Ecotourism disturbance to wildfowl in protected areas: historical, empirical and experimental approaches in the Camargue, Southern France in BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION
  • 2003-12-04. Impacts of Camping on Vegetation: Response and Recovery Following Acute and Chronic Disturbance in ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
  • 2005. Recreation at Tree Line and Interactions with Other Land-Use Activities in PLANT ECOLOGY, HERBIVORY, AND HUMAN IMPACT IN NORDIC MOUNTAIN BIRCH FORESTS
  • 2000-05. Managing Recreational Trail Environments for Mountain Bike User Preferences in ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
  • 2010-02-24. Ten Factors that Affect the Severity of Environmental Impacts of Visitors in Protected Areas in AMBIO
  • 2003-06-23. Forest Perception and Knowledge of Hikers and Mountain Bikers in Two Different Areas in Northwestern Switzerland in ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
  • 2005-06. Towards sustainable land use: identifying and managing the conflicts between human activities and biodiversity conservation in Europe in BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION
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    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10531-012-0350-y

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    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-012-0350-y

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